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Detection and typing of human papillomavirus infection of uterine cervix in young women by non-isotopic subgenomic probes on Southern blot--a report of studies in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25357
Source
Kurume Med J. 1990;37(3):195-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Kataoka
M. Yakushiji
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Japan.
Source
Kurume Med J. 1990;37(3):195-201
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blotting, Southern
Cervix Uteri - microbiology
DNA Probes, HPV - diagnostic use
Female
Humans
Papillomavirus - isolation & purification
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Virus Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Uterine Cervical Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV) was detected by non-isotopic subgenomic probes on Southern blot hybridization (Oncor Inc., Gaithenberg, MD). The 108 samples which were obtained from patients below the age of 30 (mean age 19.0 +/- 2.8 yrs). All samples were collected from the ectocervical mucosa by Cytobrush (Medscand, Malmö, Sweden) as previously described. HPV-DNA was detected in 16 cases (15%). In 36 cases (33%) the patients presented clinical findings of condyloma or cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) at simultaneous vaginal ectocervical smears. HPV-DNA was detected in 12 out of 36 cases. On the other hand, in the patients without subclinical findings HPV-DNA were detected in only 4 out of 70 cases (6%). HPV-DNA was detected in one of the 4 patients with accuminate condyloma of the cervix and in 4 out of 16 cases with similar lesions in the vulva. The only HPV type found in these patients was type 6. Papillomavirus was also detected in 5 out of 16 cases (31%) with flat condylomas, most studied types being represented here. CIN was only reported two patients both of them carrying HPV-DNA (types 16 and 18 respectively). The most common type of virus was HPV 6. Combined infections with two or three types were seen in 5 out of 16 HPV-positive cases (31%). Such cases are readily detected and typed with the present Southern blot procedure, where the use of subgenomic probes enables the distinction of all types, even when present in the same sample.
PubMed ID
2178204 View in PubMed
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[Focal epithelial hyperplasia: first cases in Switzerland and review of the literature]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4212
Source
Dermatologica. 1985;171(5):308-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
J. Samson
G. Fiore-Donno
N. Avizara
Source
Dermatologica. 1985;171(5):308-15
Date
1985
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Hyperplasia - pathology
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Mouth Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Mouth Mucosa - pathology
Papillomavirus - isolation & purification
Switzerland
Tumor Virus Infections - epidemiology - pathology
Abstract
Three cases of 'focal epithelial hyperplasia' (FEH) of the oral mucosa observed for the first time in Switzerland are reported. The patients were of Turkish and North African extraction. The lesions of FEH were multiple, painless, located at various sites of the oral mucosa including the tongue, in the form of either soft papules or hard nodules. Evidence of a human papilloma virus origin was ascertained. Among the 1,067 cases reported in the literature and reviewed for this study, this condition has been described to occur among American Indians, Eskimos and Cape Coloureds; also in Israeli and European cases the disorder was often reported in individuals of Turkish or North African extraction.
PubMed ID
3000842 View in PubMed
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Genital HPV infection not a local but a regional infection: experience from a female teenage group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24140
Source
Genitourin Med. 1993 Feb;69(1):18-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
P. Rymark
O. Forslund
B G Hansson
K. Lindholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Lund, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Genitourin Med. 1993 Feb;69(1):18-22
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Base Sequence
Condylomata Acuminata - complications
DNA Probes, HPV
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Papillomavirus - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Urethral Diseases - complications - microbiology
Uterine Cervical Diseases - complications - microbiology
Vulvar Neoplasms - complications
Abstract
OBJECTIVES--To investigate the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in a group of female teenagers, and to analyse to what extent HPV DNA was also detectable, in urethra and cervix samples among the patients with macroscopic genital warts compared with those without. DESIGN--The patients were interviewed about their sexual habits and history of venereal diseases. They underwent a gynaecological health control examination, including macroscopic inspection for genital warts and collection of a cytological vaginal smear (Pap smear). Cell samples were also taken from endocervix and urethra and from vulva lesions, when found. These samples were tested for HPV DNA of the types 6, 11, 16, 18 and 33 using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. SETTING--An adolescence out-patient clinic in Malm?, Sweden. SUBJECTS--Forty-nine female teenagers consulting for gynaecological complaints, some of them for genital warts. RESULTS--Twenty patients had present and four had a history of genital warts (group A). The other 25 patients had no visible lesions (group B). In the first group (A) 18 of the 24 patients were positive for HPV DNA in one or more of the three locations studied. More patients were positive in urethra (17) than in cervix (15). In group B four of the 25 patients were positive for HPV DNA in urethra, three of these also in cervix. In the two groups 11 and four patients, respectively, showed pathological Pap smears. CONCLUSIONS--The finding of HPV DNA in urethra, both from women with and without visible genital warts, indicates that there is a high probability that the infection is also present in cervix, suggesting that the genital HPV infections are multifocal. Thus, patients with genital warts are most likely to have cervical HPV infections and will more often have pathological Pap smears than patients without warts.
PubMed ID
8383095 View in PubMed
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[Human papillomavirus (HPV) and uterine cervix cancer--a prospective cohort study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24788
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Jul 15;153(29):2076-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1991

Immune status as a determinant of human papillomavirus detection and its association with anal epithelial abnormalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8349
Source
Int J Cancer. 1990 Aug 15;46(2):203-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1990
Author
M. Melbye
J. Palefsky
J. Gonzales
L P Ryder
H. Nielsen
O. Bergmann
J. Pindborg
R J Biggar
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1990 Aug 15;46(2):203-6
Date
Aug-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anal Canal - immunology - microbiology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Epithelium - immunology - microbiology
HIV Antibodies - analysis
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis
Homosexuality
Humans
Immunity - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth - immunology - microbiology
Papillomavirus - isolation & purification
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Tumor Virus Infections - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology - transmission
Abstract
One hundred and twenty Danish homosexual men were enrolled to characterize risk factors for anal type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) expression and to examine its association with anal epithelial atypia. Detection of HPV strongly correlated with immunosuppression measured by T-lymphocyte subset markers and rose nearly linearly from 7.3% among subjects with CD4/CD8 ratios above 1.0 to 35.3% among those with a ratio below 0.4 (p trend = 0.003). No association was found between presence of HPV and a wide range of lifestyle factors including number of sex partners/year, smoking, alcohol consumption and illegal drug intake. However, self-reported history of anal condyloma in the past year was correlated with HPV (p less than 0.001). Simultaneous testing for presence of HPV in the oral cavity showed evidence of HPV 16,18 and 31,33,35. Anal smears were abnormal in 19.5% of the men and correlated strongly with presence of HPV (OR = 6.1, p less than 0.001). Type-specific associations were found with HPV 31/33/35 (OR = 8.5) and HPV 16/18 (OR = 3.1) only. The association remained significant after adjusting for immune status. Overall, HPV was detected in 50% of the cases with abnormal smears. However, HPV was found in all subjects with abnormal smears and a CD4/CD8 ratio below 0.4, compared to only 3 of 14 subjects with abnormal smears and a ratio greater than or equal to 1.3. In conclusion, (1) HPV may be missed in a substantial number of infected subjects with a normal immune system. This may have an impact on studies trying to describe risk factors for HPV transmission and its correlation with cancer development. (2) The finding of HPV 16,18 and 31,33,35 in the oral cavity makes oral-genital sexual activity at least a hypothetical route of transmission for these HPV types. (3) HPV appears to play a central role in the development of anal epithelial abnormality.
PubMed ID
2166709 View in PubMed
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The prevalence of "high-risk" HPV types in penile condyloma-like lesions: correlation between HPV type and morphology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24082
Source
Genitourin Med. 1993 Apr;69(2):87-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
G B Löwhagen
A. Bolmstedt
W. Ryd
E. Voog
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatovenereology, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Genitourin Med. 1993 Apr;69(2):87-90
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blotting, Southern
Condylomata Acuminata - microbiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus - isolation & purification
Penile Neoplasms - microbiology - pathology
Penis - pathology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the prevalence of "high-risk" human papilloma virus (HPV) types in penile condyloma-like lesions and to correlate HPV types with clinical and histological features. DESIGN--The study included 94 male patients with signs of penile HPV infection. From acuminate, papular and macular lesions, specimens were collected for HPV DNA hybridisation, using the dot blot and Southern blot techniques. Biopsy specimens from 51 cases were examined by light microscopy for signs of koilocytosis and dysplasia. SETTING--The STD outpatient clinic of the Department of Dermatovenereology of Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. RESULTS--In 79 (90%) of 88 patients HPV DNA was detected by dot blot. Of 51 cases examined by histology 88% disclosed an evident koilocytosis. "High-risk" HPV types (16, 18, 31, 33, 35) were demonstrated in 8% of acuminate, 24% of papular and 56% of macular lesions. In 29% of 51 lesions examined histologically moderate to severe dysplasia was observed. There was a significant correlation between "high-risk" HPV types and dysplasia. CONCLUSION--"High-risk" HPV types are prevalent in papular and especially macular penile condyloma-like lesions. The histological finding of koilocytosis concomitant with dysplasia strongly indicates infection with a "high-risk" HPV type. Although the risk of penile cancer is low, it is from an epidemiological point of view important to diagnose these lesions. Until simple tests for HPV typing are available, biopsy for light microscopy (histology) should be obtained liberally from papular and macular condyloma-like lesions. In atypical cases of balanoposthitis HPV aetiology should also be considered.
PubMed ID
8389724 View in PubMed
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Risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in women with glomerulonephritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24892
Source
BMJ. 1991 Feb 16;302(6773):375-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-1991
Author
F. Hartveit
B. Bertelsen
S. Thunold
B O Maehle
E. Skaarland
J. Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Gade Institute, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
BMJ. 1991 Feb 16;302(6773):375-7
Date
Feb-16-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma in Situ - etiology
Comparative Study
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Glomerulonephritis - complications - drug therapy
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus - isolation & purification
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - etiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - etiology - microbiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To investigate the occurrence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in women with glomerulonephritis and its possible association with immunosuppressive treatment. DESIGN--Retrospective study of cytological or histological specimens from women presenting with glomerulonephritis and a group of case and age matched controls. SETTING--University department of pathology, Norway. PATIENTS--81 women presenting with glomerulonephritis from 1981 to 1988, from whom gynaecological cytological or histological specimens were available. A group of 162 case and age matched controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Age when glomerulonephritis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was diagnosed, type and characteristics of kidney lesion, stage of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and presence of human papillomavirus, use of immunosuppressive treatment. RESULTS--Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was more common in women with glomerulonephritis than in their controls (16/81 (20%) v 7/162 (4%), p less than 0.001) and was more advanced in those with glomerulonephritis than in the controls (9/81 (11%) of the study group had grade III cervical intraepithelial neoplasia compared with 1/162 (1%) of the controls). The increased occurrence of cervical lesions was independent of the use of immunosuppressive treatment, but the individual lesions tended to be more advanced when it was used (four of the seven cervical lesions in women with glomerulonephritis who had received immunosuppressive treatment were carcinoma in situ). Of the nine cervical lesions tested, seven were virus associated. CONCLUSION--Women with glomerulonephritis should have regular cervical smears, irrespective of their use of immunosuppressive treatment.
PubMed ID
1848453 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.