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Aberrant p53 protein expression in cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23877
Source
Histopathology. 1993 Nov;23(5):471-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1993
Author
R. Pöllänen
Y. Soini
K. Vähäkangas
P. Pääkkö
V P Lehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Histopathology. 1993 Nov;23(5):471-4
Date
Nov-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - metabolism - microbiology
DNA, Viral - genetics - isolation & purification
Female
Gene Expression
Genes, p53
Humans
Mutation
Papillomavirus, Human - genetics - isolation & purification
Precancerous Conditions - genetics - metabolism - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - genetics - metabolism
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - genetics - metabolism - microbiology
Abstract
We investigated aberrant p53 expression in 81 cases of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasias (CIN) using a polyclonal antibody CM-1. The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA was evaluated by in situ and dot blot hybridization. Significant (more than 1% of cells positive) p53 positivity was found in three cases (4%) of which only one contained HPV DNA. In an additional nine cases, occasional p53 staining was found in basal epithelial cells, frequently associated with epithelial hyperplasia and increased subepithelial inflammation. The results show that aberrant p53 expression is an infrequent finding in CIN lesions. It can be seen in lesions both with and without HPV infection. Most importantly, there was no p53 expression in most cases of HPV-negative CIN, suggesting that p53 inactivation is not an obligatory step in the development of cervical dysplasia. However, our findings do not exclude the possibility that p53 mutations can occur later in the course of cervical carcinogenesis.
PubMed ID
8314222 View in PubMed
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Absence of p53 mutations in benign and pre-malignant male genital lesions with over-expressed p53 protein.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21534
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Aug 31;77(5):674-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-31-1998
Author
K. Castrén
K. Vähäkangas
E. Heikkinen
A. Ranki
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Aug 31;77(5):674-8
Date
Aug-31-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy
Bowen's Disease - genetics - pathology
Carcinoma in Situ - genetics - pathology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - genetics - pathology
Condylomata Acuminata - genetics - pathology
Exons
Female
Genes, p53
Genital Diseases, Male - genetics - pathology - surgery
Genital Neoplasms, Male - genetics - pathology - surgery
Humans
Male
Mutation
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Precancerous Conditions - genetics - pathology - surgery
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - biosynthesis
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - genetics
Vulvar Neoplasms - pathology
Abstract
Mutations of the tumor-suppressor gene p53 are common in epithelial tumors. Clonal mutations of p53 have been found in cervical and vulvar carcinomas negative for human papillomavirus (HPV), though at least in cervical cancer HPV infection and p53 mutations are not mutually exclusive. We have previously shown that about 40% of male genital warts and bowenoid papulosis lesions exhibit immunohistochemically detectable aberrant p53 protein, irrespective of the presence of HPV DNA. We studied p53 mutations in exons 4-8 with SSCP and sequencing in 13 male patients with 1 to 3 therapy-resistant genital warts or intra-epithelial neoplasias each and in 4 patients with penile squamous cell carcinoma. Thus, 13 genital warts, 6 bowenoid papulosis, 1 Queyrat's erythroplasia and 1 carcinoma in situ were studied. p53 protein was detected immunohistochemically, and HPV status was analyzed with DNA in situ hybridization and amplification of HPV-specific DNA. There was no correlation between p53 protein expression and HPV status. No mutations in exons 5-8 of the p53 gene were found in any of the lesions, and furthermore, no exon 4 mutations were found in lesions positive in p53 immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, overexpression of p53 does not indicate a p53 mutation in male genital warts, pre-malignant lesions or malignant squamous cell carcinomas. Our study thus suggests that p53 mutations are not important, or at least not early, events in male genital carcinogenesis.
PubMed ID
9688297 View in PubMed
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Acetowhitening of the cervix and vulva as a predictor of subclinical human papillomavirus infection: sensitivity and specificity in a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21915
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Nov;90(5):744-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
M. Jonsson
R. Karlsson
M. Evander
A. Gustavsson
E. Rylander
G. Wadell
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Nov;90(5):744-7
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetic Acid - administration & dosage
Adult
Cervix Uteri - pathology - virology
Colposcopy
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Indicators and Reagents - administration & dosage
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Papovaviridae Infections - epidemiology - pathology
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Tumor Virus Infections - epidemiology - pathology
Vaginal Smears
Vulva - pathology - virology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate acetowhite changes of the cervix and vulva as a predictor of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. METHODS: In this population-based study all women aged 19, 21, 23, and 25 years and registered as living in a primary health care area within the city of Umeå, Sweden were eligible for inclusion. Each participant underwent a gynecologic examination with sampling of epithelial cells for HPV-DNA detection and Papanicolaou smear. Colposcopy was performed 5 minutes after application of 5% acetic acid. A two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was employed for HPV-DNA detection. RESULTS: Colposcopy and sampling of epithelial cells could be performed in 535 women. The sensitivity of detection of HPV infection by the acetowhitening of the cervix was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI] 18%, 26%). The specificity of detection of HPV infection by the acetowhitening of the cervix was 90% (95% CI 87%, 93%). The sensitivity of detection of HPV infection by cytology was 13% (95% CI 10%, 16%), and the specificity was 99% (95% CI 98%, 100%). The combination of acetowhitening and cytology did not improve the diagnostic value. CONCLUSION: Acetowhitening of the cervix and vulva has low sensitivity as a predictor of HPV infections as determined by PCR.
PubMed ID
9351757 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix: the presence of human papillomavirus and the method of detection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18218
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Oct;82(10):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Sonia Andersson
Barbro Larson
Anders Hjerpe
Claes Silfverswärd
Jan Sällström
Erik Wilander
Eva Rylander
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Science, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. sonia.andersson@telia.com
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Oct;82(10):960-5
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Adult
Age Factors
Contraceptives, Oral
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Papovaviridae Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Virus Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Vaginal Smears - standards
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Effective screening programs have contributed to a decrease in the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinomas but have had a limited sensitivity in the detection of adenocarcinoma precursor lesions. The aim of our study was to analyze cervical adenocarcinoma in greater detail: symptoms preceding the detection, the method of detection and the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) with respect to age at diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clinical data were abstracted from the medical records of 82 women with pure invasive cervical adenocarcinomas. As diagnostic tools we used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and/or direct DNA sequencing for HPV detection. RESULTS: Age at diagnosis predicting factors were HPV status, positive lymph nodes, histology and stage. HPV-negativity, lymph node metastases, advanced stage and poor differentiation were all associated with a high diagnostic age. In the multivariate analysis only HPV status was shown to have an independent impact on age at diagnosis, while stage showed only borderline significance. Twenty-three percent of the cancers were detected by screening and the remaining were due to different symptoms. Among the women considered, 93% had a normal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear 3 years before diagnosis and 60% within 1 year. There was no significant correlation between smoking, oral contraceptives and HPV-positivity. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of HPV was significantly associated with a high age at diagnosis. Pap screening had a limited effect in detecting adenocarcinoma at an early stage.
PubMed ID
12956848 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and risk for cancer of the cervix uteri, vagina, and vulva.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19635
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Aug;10(8):899-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
E. Weiderpass
W. Ye
R. Tamimi
D. Trichopolous
O. Nyren
H. Vainio
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. Weiderpass@iarc.fr
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Aug;10(8):899-901
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - complications
Carcinoma in Situ - complications - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Odds Ratio
Papillomavirus, Human - pathogenicity
Papovaviridae Infections - complications
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vaginal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vaginal Smears
Vulvar Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We conducted a population-based cohort study to analyze the risk of developing cancers of the female genitals among 36,856 patients with a hospital discharge diagnosis of alcoholism (ICD-7: 307, 322; ICD-8: 291, 303; ICD-9: 291, 303, 305A) in Sweden between 1965 and 1995. The follow-up was done by linkages of national registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed based on nationwide specific cancer rates. The first year of follow-up was excluded from all analyses to minimize the impact of selection bias. We found that alcoholic women had excess risks for in situ cervical cancer (SIR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.6-1.9), for invasive cervical cancer (SIR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.4-3.5), and for cancer of the vagina (SIR, 4.6; 95% CI, 2.2-8.5) but not for cancer of the vulva (SIR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.4-2.0). The fact that alcoholics had an excess risk also for the in situ cancer suggests that the observed excess in invasive cervical cancer may not only be attributable to less use of Pap smear screening among them. The alcoholic women may be at higher risk for the progression from human papillomavirus infection to a malignant lesion for lifestyle-related reasons (promiscuity, smoking, use of contraceptive hormones, and dietary deficiencies). We conclude that alcoholic women are at high risk for in situ and invasive cervical cancer and for cancer of the vagina.
PubMed ID
11489758 View in PubMed
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Anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV positive people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7431
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2001 Oct;77(5):327-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
F. Martin
M. Bower
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH, UK.
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2001 Oct;77(5):327-31
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - virology
Carcinoma in Situ - epidemiology - pathology - virology
Female
HIV Seropositivity
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Incidence
Male
Papillomavirus, Human - genetics
Papovaviridae Infections - complications - pathology
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Tumor Virus Infections - complications - pathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on HIV associated anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). METHODS: A comprehensive Medline/Pubmed search was performed for the years 1980-2001 (January) for articles pertaining to HIV associated anal intraepithelial neoplasia. From the MeSH terms "anal intraepithelial neoplasia" and "anal cancer" the following subheadings were used: HIV, homosexual men, HPV, Epidemiology, Etiology, Mortality, Diagnosis, Screening, Drug Therapy, Surgical Therapy, Radio Therapy, Risk factors, ASIL. The search was limited to "human" for all searches. In the absence of enough "randomised controlled trials" the search was extended to clinical trials, reviews, and case reports. One analysis on cost effectiveness and two abstracts presented at 12th World AIDS Conference and 6th Conference on Retrovirus and Opportunistic Infections were included. The 44 publications referred to originate from the United Kingdom (9), the United States (26), and Denmark (5), with one each from Switzerland, Germany, Australia, and France. The Cochrane Database of systematic reviews yielded 11 complete reviews for "anal cancer" and none for "anal intraepithelial neoplasia." The textbook of AIDS-related cancers and their treatment was consulted. We also included our personal experience from the treatment of patients at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, one of the largest centres for the management of HIV disease in Europe. CONCLUSION: Routine anal cytological screening followed by appropriate management of AIN is an important issue for HIV infected patients. The natural history of AIN has not been fully established and this prevents clinicians from defining clear management protocols. There is early evidence that the benefits of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in terms of restoring immune function and reducing opportunistic infections and some neoplasms may not extend to regression of AIN. Under these circumstances it might be predicted that AIN and subsequent progression to invasive anal cancer would rise as HAART prolongs the lives of seropositive people. However, routine anal cytological screening will surely have to await an effective proved intervention for AIN and this would seem to be a pressing clinical goal.
PubMed ID
11588276 View in PubMed
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An increased risk of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia grade II-III among human papillomavirus positive patients with the HLA-DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 haplotype: a population-based case-control study of Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21718
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Mar 30;76(1):19-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-1998
Author
A. Helland
A O Olsen
K. Gjøen
H E Akselsen
T. Sauer
P. Magnus
A L Børresen-Dale
K S Rønningen
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, Institute of Cancer Research, the Norwegian Radiumhospital, Oslo.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Mar 30;76(1):19-24
Date
Mar-30-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carcinoma in Situ - genetics - virology
Case-Control Studies
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - genetics - virology
Female
HLA-D Antigens - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Norway
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Papovaviridae Infections - complications - virology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - genetics - virology
Abstract
Several recent studies have reported different associations between HLA specificities and human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated disease of the cervix. We report the distribution of DQA1 and DQB1 genes and HPV infection in a population-based case-control study including 92 patients with histologically verified cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II-III (CIN II-III) (thus including moderate and severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ) and 225 control subjects. We found an overrepresentation of the DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 haplotype among HPV-positive cases compared with controls. The association was even stronger when comparing HPV-16-positive cases with HPV-16-positive controls. In addition, among HPV-16-positive individuals, we observed a decreased frequency of DQA1*0102-DQB1*0604 in cases compared with controls. We were not able to detect any association between CIN II-III and DQB1*03. Compared with previous findings in cervical cancer, our data indicate that carrying the DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 haplotype gives an increased risk of developing CIN when infected with HPV-16, without influencing progression to cancer.
PubMed ID
9533756 View in PubMed
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Association between human papillomavirus 16 E6 variants and human leukocyte antigen class I polymorphism in cervical cancer of Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18506
Source
Hum Immunol. 2003 May;64(5):538-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Ingeborg Zehbe
Joannis Mytilineos
Ingrid Wikström
Rudi Henriksen
Lutz Edler
Massimo Tommasino
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology (I.Z.), University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany. zehbe@mail.uni-mainz.de
Source
Hum Immunol. 2003 May;64(5):538-42
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA Antigens - genetics - immunology
Humans
Oncogene Proteins, Viral - genetics
Papillomavirus Infections - genetics - immunology
Papillomavirus, Human - genetics - immunology
Repressor Proteins
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Tumor Virus Infections - genetics - immunology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - genetics - immunology - virology
Abstract
Persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly HPV16, represents the prime risk factor in cervical carcinogenesis. HPV variants (e.g., within the E6 gene) together with immunogenetic factors of the host may be responsible either for effective viral clearance, or alternatively, for viral persistence. Peripheral blood from 27 HPV16 positive Swedish women with cervical carcinoma, who had previously been tested for HPV16 E6 variants, was used for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I typing. Women with HLA-B*44, HLA-B*51, or HLA-B*57 who were infected with the HPV16 E6 variant L83V had an approximately four- to fivefold increased risk for cancer compared with controls (odds ratio [OR] = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.1-11.1, OR = 4.2, 95% CI = 1.19-14.69, or OR = 4.67, 95% CI = 1.2-18.6, respectively). Epitope predictive algorithm with SYFPEITHI revealed that the variant at amino acid 83 affects the binding affinity in association with HLA-B*44. Interestingly, the HLA-B*15 allele seems protective because it was absent in HPV16 positive cancer. It is concluded that specific HLA class I alleles, combined with certain HPV16 E6 variants, may be crucial for immune surveillance in cervical carcinogenesis. The evaluation of associations of HLA alleles with HPV variants may be helpful in defining prognostic markers and in designing vaccines capable of mediating immune protection against HPV infection.
PubMed ID
12691704 View in PubMed
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Association between the HLA DQB1*0301 gene and human papillomavirus infection in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19053
Source
Int J Gynecol Pathol. 1999 Jul;18(3):206-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
A K Lie
S. Skarsvåg
O A Haugen
F E Skjeldestad
A O Olsen
E. Skovlund
K S Rønningen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology and Institute of Morphology, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Int J Gynecol Pathol. 1999 Jul;18(3):206-10
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Biopsy
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - genetics - pathology - virology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
Heterozygote
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Papillomavirus Infections - genetics
Papillomavirus, Human - classification
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Virus Infections - genetics
Abstract
This study describes the distribution of DQB1genes in Norwegian women treated for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 170 biopsy specimens with diagnoses of CIN II (n = 54) or CIN III (n = 116) were DQB1-typed using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. The follow-up period for cases was 13 to 15 years. The control material comprised blood samples and endocervical brushes from 213 women without CIN. Both cases and controls had previously been human papillomavirus (HPV)-typed. The DQB1*0301 allele was overrepresented among cases compared with controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8). Presence of CIN was related to HPV infection, and HPV 16 positivity was significantly associated with the presence of DQB1*0301 (OR 1.8). The DQBI*0301 allele was significantly more prevalent in CIN III than in CIN II cases. The lesions in two women recurred in the follow-up period, one of whom was carrying the DQB1*0301 allele. Women carrying the HLA-DQB1*0301 allele have an increased risk of developing CIN when infected by HPV 16, although there was not an increased frequency of recurrent disease among women carrying this allele.
PubMed ID
12090587 View in PubMed
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The association of vascular proliferation with HPV status and epithelial PCNA positivity in cervical intraepithelial lesions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22743
Source
APMIS. 1996 Mar;104(3):183-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
Y. Soini
R. Pöllänen
S. Kemppainen
P. Pääkkö
V P Lehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
APMIS. 1996 Mar;104(3):183-90
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, Neoplasm - analysis
Biological Markers
Cell Division
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - blood supply - chemistry - virology
Comparative Study
Condylomata Acuminata - metabolism - virology
DNA Probes, HPV
DNA, Viral - isolation & purification
Endothelium, Vascular - chemistry
Female
Humans
Ki-67 Antigen
Neoplasm Proteins - analysis
Neovascularization, Pathologic - metabolism - virology
Nuclear Proteins - analysis
Papillomavirus, Human - classification - isolation & purification
Papovaviridae Infections - metabolism - virology
Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen - analysis
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - analysis
Tumor Virus Infections - metabolism - virology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - blood supply - chemistry - virology
Uterine Cervicitis - metabolism - virology
von Willebrand Factor - analysis
Abstract
In this study we investigated the number of blood vessels and vascular proliferation in subepithelial areas of 80 cervical condylomas and cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN). The number of blood vessels was determined by counting factor VIIIRAg-positive vascular channels in areas beneath the epithelial lesions. Vascular proliferation was evaluated by determining the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive endothelial cells in the subepithelial connective tissues. The results were compared with the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA subgroups (6/11 (low-risk) and 16/18/31/33/35 (high-risk) of the lesions, as determined by dot-blot and in situ hybridization, and with epithelial cell proliferation as determined by immunohistochemistry for PCNA. Also p53 immunohistochemistry of the lesions was performed. Even though CIN II-III lesions on average contained more factor VIIIRAg-positive blood vessels compared to condylomas and CIN I lesions, no significant association was found between their number and the degree of dysplasia. However, moderate or strong PCNA staining in vascular endothelial cells was seen significantly more often in CIN II-III lesions than in condylomas and CIN I lesions (p = 0.008): 34/80 (45%) cases contained detectable HPV DNA as determined by dot-blot or in situ hybridization. There was no correlation between the presence or absence of HPV DNA and the number of PCNA-positive endothelial cells. Nine cases showed p53-positive cell nuclei and in three cases there was more than 1% positive nuclei in the lesion. No association was found between the vascularity or the number of PCNA-positive endothelial cells and the p53 immunoreactivity. The increased proliferative activity of endothelial cells in CIN II-III lesions suggests that they are angiogenically more active than condylomas and CIN I lesions. This activity does not, however, depend on the HPV or p53 status. This is the first report in which endothelial cell PCNA positivity was used as a marker for vascular proliferation.
PubMed ID
8611192 View in PubMed
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146 records – page 1 of 15.