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Assessment of physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders in structured diagnostic interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164012
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):462-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Scott B Patten
Jeanne V A Williams
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary (AB) Canada T2N 4N1. patten@ucalgary.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):462-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Episode of Care
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Panic Disorder - epidemiology
Precipitating Factors
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Self-Assessment
Syndrome
Abstract
Structured diagnostic inter- views include items that evaluate physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders. The objective of this article was to assess the impact of such items.
A mental health survey in Canada collected data from n = 36,984 household residents. The lifetime prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders was calculated with and without exclusions due to physical causes.
Approximately 10% of subjects with a lifetime depressive disorder reported that all of their episodes were due to one or more physical cause. Many of the reported etiologies were implausible given the DSM-IV requirement that the disturbance be a "direct physiological consequence" of the physical cause. The results were similar for manic episodes and anxiety disorders.
Structured diagnostic interviews assess physical etiologies in ways that are subject to inconsistency and inaccuracy. Physical etiology items may bias estimates by introducing etiological opinions into the assessment of disorder frequency.
PubMed ID
17450450 View in PubMed
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Associations between dimensions of anxiety sensitivity and PTSD symptom clusters in active-duty police officers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157237
Source
Cogn Behav Ther. 2008;37(2):66-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Gordon J G Asmundson
Jennifer A Stapleton
Author Affiliation
Anxiety and Illness Behaviours Laboratory and The Traumatic Stress Group, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. gordon.asmundson@uregina.ca
Source
Cogn Behav Ther. 2008;37(2):66-75
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Depression - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Panic Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Police
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Prior studies have shown that anxiety sensitivity (AS) plays an important role in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between empirically supported PTSD symptom clusters (i.e. reexperiencing, avoidance, numbing, hyperarousal) and AS dimensions (i.e. psychological concerns, social concerns, somatic concerns). Participants were 138 active-duty police officers (70.7% female; mean age = 38.9 years; mean time policing = 173.8 months) who, as a part of a larger study, completed measures of trauma exposure, PTSD symptoms, AS, and depressive symptoms. All participants reported experiencing at least one event that they perceived as traumatic, and 44 (31.9%) screened positive for PTSD. Officers with probable PTSD scored significantly higher on AS total as well as the somatic and psychological concerns dimensional scores than did those without PTSD. As well, a higher percentage of officers with probable PTSD scored positively on the AS-derived Brief Screen for Panic Disorder (Apfeldorf et al., 1994) compared with those without PTSD. A series of regression analyses revealed that depressive symptoms, number of reported traumas, and AS somatic concerns were significant predictors of PTSD total symptom severity as well as severity of reexperiencing. Avoidance was predicted by depressive symptoms and AS somatic concerns. Only depressive symptoms were significantly predictive of numbing and hyperarousal cluster scores. These findings contribute to understanding the nature of association between AS and PTSD symptom clusters. Implications for the treatment of individuals having PTSD with and without panic-related symptomatology are discussed.
PubMed ID
18470738 View in PubMed
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The CANMAT task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid anxiety disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127358
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):6-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Ayal Schaffer
Diane McIntosh
Benjamin I Goldstein
Neil A Rector
Roger S McIntyre
Serge Beaulieu
Richard Swinson
Lakshmi N Yatham
Author Affiliation
Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ayal.schaffer@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):6-22
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Advisory Committees
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Canada
Child
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Humans
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Panic Disorder - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Phobic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Abstract
Comorbid mood and anxiety disorders are commonly seen in clinical practice. The goal of this article is to review the available literature on the epidemiologic, etiologic, clinical, and management aspects of this comorbidity and formulate a set of evidence- and consensus-based recommendations. This article is part of a set of Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Comorbidity Task Force papers.
We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language articles published between January 1966 and November 2010. The search terms were bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, cross-referenced with anxiety disorders/symptoms, panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Levels of evidence for specific interventions were assigned based on a priori determined criteria, and recommendations were developed by integrating the level of evidence and clinical opinion of the authors.
Comorbid anxiety symptoms and disorders have a significant impact on the clinical presentation and treatment approach for patients with mood disorders. A set of recommendations are provided for the management of bipolar disorder (BD) with comorbid anxiety and major depressive disorder (MDD) with comorbid anxiety with a focus on comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder, use of cognitive-behavioral therapy across mood and anxiety disorders, and youth with mood and anxiety disorders.
Careful attention should be given to correctly identifying anxiety comorbidities in patients with BD or MDD. Consideration of evidence- or consensus-based treatment recommendations for the management of both mood and anxiety symptoms is warranted.
PubMed ID
22303519 View in PubMed
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Cognitive-behavioural group treatment of panic disorder and agoraphobia in a psychiatric setting: A naturalistic study of effectiveness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172641
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2005;59(3):198-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Nicole K Rosenberg
Esben Hougaard
Author Affiliation
Center for Anxiety and Personality Disorders, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Aarhus, Denmark. Nkr@psykiatri.aaa.dk
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2005;59(3):198-204
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agoraphobia - epidemiology - therapy
Ambulatory Care
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Comorbidity
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Panic Disorder - epidemiology - therapy
Patient satisfaction
Psychotherapy, Group
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural group treatment of panic disorder and agoraphobia in a clinical setting. Fifty-three patients were offered treatment and assessed before, after and at follow-up 1 1/2-2 years after treatment. The study included an informal waiting-list control group of 40 patients. The investigation group achieved better outcome on most analyses with 47.2% found to be panic-free after treatment compared with 12.5% in the control group. Treatment gains were durable with 66.7% without panic attacks at follow-up. Most patients, however, still had major psychological problems after treatment. The outcomes of cognitive-behavioural group treatment of panic disorder in this study were modest compared with most controlled studies, possibly due to an unselected patient group with a high degree of agoraphobia.
Notes
Comment In: Nord J Psychiatry. 2005;59(3):16516195115
PubMed ID
16195120 View in PubMed
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Cross cultural evaluation of smokers risk for panic and anxiety pathology: a test in a Russian epidemiological sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183664
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2003 Oct;41(10):1199-215
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Michael J Zvolensky
Roman Kotov
Anna V Antipova
Norman B Schmidt
Author Affiliation
The University of Vermont, Department of Psychology, John Dewey Hall, Burlington, VT 05405-0134, USA. mzvolen@dewey.uvm.edu
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2003 Oct;41(10):1199-215
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Agoraphobia - epidemiology - etiology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow - epidemiology
Panic Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
The present study evaluated the main and interactive effects of level of smoking (cigarettes per day) and anxiety sensitivity (fear of anxiety and anxiety related sensations) in predicting panic and anxiety variables in an epidemiologically-defined sample of smokers from Moscow (n=95). The combination of high levels of anxiety sensitivity and smoking predicted agoraphobic avoidance, but not frequency of panic attacks during the past week. These findings suggest anxiety sensitivity may moderate the relation between level of smoking and prototypical panic psychopathology variables (panic attacks and agoraphobic avoidance) even after controlling for the theoretically-relevant factors of alcohol abuse and negative affect.
PubMed ID
12971940 View in PubMed
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Inclusion of coexisting morbidity in a TBSA% and age based model for the prediction of mortality after burns does not increase its predictive power.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276356
Source
Burns. 2015 Dec;41(8):1868-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Laura Pompermaier
Ingrid Steinvall
Mats Fredrikson
Folke Sjöberg
Source
Burns. 2015 Dec;41(8):1868-76
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Area Under Curve
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology
Body surface area
Borderline Personality Disorder - epidemiology
Burns - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology
Child
Comorbidity
Databases, Factual
Decision Support Techniques
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - epidemiology
Panic Disorder - epidemiology
ROC Curve
Respiration, Artificial - statistics & numerical data
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Trauma Severity Indices
Young Adult
Abstract
Several models for predicting mortality have been developed for patients with burns, and the most commonly used are based on age and total body surface area (TBSA%). They often show good predictive precision as depicted by high values for area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). However the effect of coexisting morbidity on such prediction models has not to our knowledge been thoroughly examined. We hypothesised that adding it to a previously published model (based on age, TBSA%, full thickness burns, gender, and need for mechanical ventilation) would further improve its predictive power.
We studied 772 patients admitted during the period 1997-2008 to the Linköping University Hospital, National Burn Centre with any type of burns. We defined coexisting morbidity as any of the medical conditions listed in the Charlson list, as well as psychiatric disorders or drug or alcohol misuse. We added coexisting medical conditions to the model for predicting mortality (age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation) to determine whether it improved the model as assessed by changes in deviances between the models.
Mean (SD) age and TBSA% was 35 (26) years and 13 (17) %, respectively. Among 725 patients who survived, 105 (14%) had one or more coexisting condition, compared with 28 (60%) among those 47 who died. The presence of coexisting conditions increased with age (p
PubMed ID
26507519 View in PubMed
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Mental health service use, depression, panic disorder and life events among Swedish young adults in 2000 and 2010: a repeated cross-sectional population study in Stockholm County, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297432
Source
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2018 10; 27(5):510-518
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2018
Author
A Lundin
Y Forsell
C Dalman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences,Karolinska Institutet,Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2018 10; 27(5):510-518
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Panic Disorder - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The use of specialised psychiatric services for depression and anxiety has increased steadily among young people in Sweden during recent years. It is not known to what extent this service use is due to an increase in psychiatric morbidity, or whether other adversities explain these trends. The aim of this study is to examine if there is increased use of psychiatric services among young adults in Sweden between 2000 and 2010, and if so, to what extent this increase is associated with differences in depression, anxiety and negative life events.
This is a repeated cross-sectional study of 20-30-year old men and women in Stockholm County in 2000 and 2010 (n = 2590 and n = 1120). Log-binomial regression analyses were conducted to compare the prevalence of service use, depression and panic disorder between the two cohorts. Self-reported life events were entered individually and as a summary index, and entered as potential mediators. Different effects of life events on service use were examined through interaction analysis. We report prevalence proportion ratios (PPR) with 95% confidence intervals.
Specialised psychiatric service use, but also depression and panic disorder was more common in the younger cohort (current service use 2.4 and 5.0%). The younger cohort did not report more life events overall or among those with depression or anxiety. Neither depression, panic disorder nor life events could explain the increased use of psychiatric services in the younger cohort (Fully adjusted model PPR = 1.70, 1.20-2.40 95% CI). There was no significant interaction between cohort and life events in predicting psychiatric service use.
This study provides initial support for an increase in service use among young adults compared with 10 years earlier. The increased service use cannot be explained with increasing worse life situations.
PubMed ID
28367775 View in PubMed
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Migraine, major depression, panic disorder, and personality traits in women aged 40-74 years: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45972
Source
Cephalalgia. 2002 Sep;22(7):543-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
P. Mattsson
L. Ekselius
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Peter.Mattsson@neurologi.uu.se
Source
Cephalalgia. 2002 Sep;22(7):543-51
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Panic Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Personality
Personality Tests - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigates the associations between migraine on the one hand and lifetime major depression, lifetime panic disorder, and neuroticism evaluated using the Swedish universities Scales of Personality on the other. A neurologist clinically assessed 728 women aged 40-74 years attending a population-based mammography screening programme. The associations between lifetime migraine and personality traits and psychiatric disorders were insignificant in multivariable analysis. However, in old women (60-74 years) the risk for active migraine was strongly associated with a history of major depression and high levels of stress susceptibility and somatic trait anxiety. Furthermore, in old women, high levels of stress susceptibility and somatic trait anxiety were associated with low ratings of migraine pain intensity and lower levels of these traits with high ratings after controlling for disability during migraines, whereas there were only small differences in middle-aged women. The results suggest that certain aspects of neuroticism are important mental correlates of the ability of old women to endure migraine pain.
PubMed ID
12230596 View in PubMed
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No association between the -399 C > T polymorphism of the neuropeptide Y gene and schizophrenia, unipolar depression or panic disorder in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76198
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2006 Jan;113(1):54-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
C. Lindberg
P. Koefoed
E S Hansen
T G Bolwig
J F Rehfeld
E. Mellerup
O S Jørgensen
L V Kessing
T. Werge
S. Haugbøl
A G Wang
D P D Woldbye
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen & Rigshospitalet University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2006 Jan;113(1):54-8
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
DNA Primers - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropeptide Y - genetics
Panic Disorder - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A polymorphism in the promoter region of the NPY gene at position -399 C > T was recently reported to be associated with schizophrenia in a Japanese population and with treatment refractory unipolar depression in a Swedish population. The objective of this study was to investigate potential associations between the polymorphism and three psychiatric disorders in a Danish population. METHOD: We investigated the occurrence of the polymorphism in patients with schizophrenia (n = 291), unipolar depression (n = 256) and panic disorder (n = 142) compared with controls (n = 716). RESULTS: We detected the polymorphism -399 C > T at a frequency of 48% in controls. No significant differences were found between genotype or allele frequencies in controls vs. the patient groups. CONCLUSION: The lack of association between the -399 C > T polymorphism and schizophrenia, unipolar depression or panic disorder, respectively, suggests that the polymorphism is not involved in the etiology of these disorders in the Danish population.
PubMed ID
16390370 View in PubMed
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Obtaining a driver's license and seizure relapse in patients with childhood-onset epilepsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176057
Source
Neurology. 2005 Feb 22;64(4):680-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-2005
Author
Matti Sillanpää
Shlomo Shinnar
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. matti.sillanpaa@utu.fi
Source
Neurology. 2005 Feb 22;64(4):680-6
Date
Feb-22-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age of Onset
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Epilepsy - epidemiology - psychology
Fear
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Panic Disorder - epidemiology
Prognosis
Recurrence
Risk
Risk factors
Abstract
To examine factors influencing obtaining a driver's license and subsequent prognosis among people with epilepsy vs control subjects.
Eighty-one patients from a population-based cohort with childhood-onset epilepsy, followed prospectively for 45 years, and 96 general population control subjects were compared with regard to driving licensing, seizure relapses, and accidents.
By the end of the follow-up period, all 81 subjects had achieved at least one 2-year seizure-free interval in adulthood and were eligible for a driver's license. Of these, 64 vs 90% of control subjects had obtained a license (p
PubMed ID
15728292 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.