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Epidemiology of psychiatric disorders in Edmonton. Panic disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219174
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1994;376:45-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
C L Dick
R C Bland
S C Newman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1994;376:45-53
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Alcoholism - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Panic Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
A random sample of 3258 adult household residents of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada were interviewed by trained lay interviewers using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS), which gives DSM-III diagnostic data on each individual interviewed. This paper reports results for panic disorder. Panic disorder was found to affect women primarily (female:male morbidity risk 2.2:1). The mean age of onset (first symptom) was 19.3 years for men and 21.5 years for women. Rarely did symptoms first occur after the age of forty. The lifetime prevalence rate was 1.7% for women and 0.8% for men and the lifetime morbidity risk was 3.7% for females and 1.7% for males. All twelve panic symptoms were found to be highly specific for panic disorder. Women complained of more (means = 8.0) symptoms than men (means = 6.0). On average 7.3 symptoms were reported. Those with panic disorder showed increased lifetime prevalence rates for major depressive episode (73.4%), alcohol abuse/dependence (54.2%), drug abuse/dependence (43%) and phobia (44.2%). Altogether, 90.4% of those with panic disorder also met criteria for another DSM-III diagnosis, which was 2.7 times the rate in those who did not have panic disorder.
PubMed ID
8178684 View in PubMed
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