Skip header and navigation

Refine By

414 records – page 1 of 42.

1918 Pandemic Influenza mortality in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297040
Source
Health Analytics and Vital Records, Division of Public Health, Department of Health and Social Services, State of Alaska.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2018
1 Health Analytics and Vital Records Division of Public Health Department of Health and Social Services HealthAnalytics@Alaska.gov Alaska Facts and Figures 1918 Pandemic Influenza Mortality in Alaska Background The 1918 Pandemic Influenza (“Spanish Flu” or flu) in Alaska developed later
  1 document  
Author
Health Analytics Unit of the Alaska Health Analytics and Vital Records Section
Source
Health Analytics and Vital Records, Division of Public Health, Department of Health and Social Services, State of Alaska.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
350828
Keywords
Alaska
Pandemic influenza
Spanish flu
Mortality
Notes
Alaska Facts and Figures.
Documents

AK_1918Flu_DataBrief_092018.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

1918 pandemic morbidity: The first wave hits the poor, the second wave hits the rich.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299653
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2018 05; 12(3):307-313
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Svenn-Erik Mamelund
Author Affiliation
Work Research Institute, OsloMet-Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2018 05; 12(3):307-313
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
History, 20th Century
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Influenza Pandemic, 1918-1919 - economics - statistics & numerical data
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Male
Morbidity
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics - economics - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Class
Vaccination
Abstract
Whether morbidity from the 1918-19 influenza pandemic discriminated by socioeconomic status has remained a subject of debate for 100 years. In lack of data to study this issue, the recent literature has hypothesized that morbidity was "socially neutral."
To study the associations between influenza-like illness (ILI) and socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and wave during the 1918-19 influenza pandemic.
Availability of incidence data on the 1918-19 pandemic is scarce, in particular for waves other than the "fall wave" October-December 1918. Here, an overlooked survey from Bergen, Norway (n = 10 633), is used to study differences in probabilities of ILI and ILI probability ratios by apartment size as a measure of SES and gender for 3 waves including the waves prior to and after the "fall wave."
Socioeconomic status was negatively associated with ILI in the first wave, but positively associated in the second wave. At all SES levels, men had the highest ILI in the summer, while women had the highest ILI in the fall. There were no SES or gender differences in ILI in the winter of 1919.
For the first time, it is documented a crossover in the role of socioeconomic status in 1918 pandemic morbidity. The poor came down with influenza first, while the rich with less exposure in the first wave had the highest morbidity in the second wave. The study suggests that the socioeconomically disadvantaged should be prioritized if vaccines are of limited availability in a future pandemic.
PubMed ID
29356350 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: the role of threat, coping, and media trust on vaccination intentions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117388
Source
J Health Commun. 2013;18(3):278-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sheena Aislinn Taha
Kimberly Matheson
Hymie Anisman
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sheena_taha@carleton.ca
Source
J Health Commun. 2013;18(3):278-90
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Intention
Male
Mass Media
Pandemics - prevention & control
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Trust
Vaccination - psychology
Abstract
Swine flu (H1N1) reached pandemic proportions in 2009, yet ambivalence was met concerning intentions to be vaccinated. The present investigation determined predictors of perceived H1N1 contraction risk and vaccination intentions among Canadian adults (N = 1,027) responding to an online questionnaire. The relatively low rate of vaccination intent (30.12%, and 34.99% being unsure of their intent) was related to a sense of invulnerability regarding illness contraction and symptom severity. Most individuals were skeptical that H1N1 would be widespread, believing that less than 10% of the population would contract H1N1. Yet, they also indicated that their attitudes would change once a single person they knew contracted the illness. Also, worry regarding H1N1 was related to self-contraction risk and odds of individuals seeking vaccination. Moreover, vaccination intent was related to the perception that the threat was not particularly great, mistrust of the media to provide accurate information regarding H1N1, and whether individuals endorsed problem-focused versus avoidant coping strategies. Given the role media plays in public perceptions related to a health crisis, trust in this outlet and credibility regarding the threat are necessary for adherence to recommended measures to minimize health risk.
PubMed ID
23301849 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
Less detail

2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136553
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Jay D Wenger
Louisa J Castrodale
Dana L Bruden
James W Keck
Tammy Zulz
Michael G Bruce
Donna A Fearey
Joe McLaughlin
Debby Hurlburt
Kim Boyd Hummel
Sassa Kitka
Steve Bentley
Timothy K Thomas
Rosalyn Singleton
John T Redd
Larry Layne
James E Cheek
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jdw2@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child, Preschool
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Geography
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Groups
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.
PubMed ID
21342894 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2009 Provincial decision to de-emphasize seasonal influenza vaccine in Canada: real-time risk-benefit analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136573
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Mar 15;52(6):829-30; author reply 830-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2011
Author
Perry R W Kendall
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Mar 15;52(6):829-30; author reply 830-1
Date
Mar-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Pandemics
Risk assessment
Vaccination - utilization
Notes
Comment On: Clin Infect Dis. 2010 Dec 15;51(12):1380-221067354
PubMed ID
21367739 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute kidney injury among critically ill patients with pandemic H1N1 influenza A in Canada: cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113108
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:123
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sean M Bagshaw
Manish M Sood
Jennifer Long
Robert A Fowler
Neill K J Adhikari
Author Affiliation
Division of Critical Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 3C1.12 Walter C Mackenzie Centre, 8440-112 St NW, Edmonton, AB T6G 2B7, Canada.
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:123
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Critical Illness - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Canada's pandemic H1N1 influenza A (pH1N1) outbreak led to a high burden of critical illness. Our objective was to describe the incidence of AKI (acute kidney injury) in these patients and risk factors for AKI, renal replacement therapy (RRT), and mortality.
From a prospective cohort of critically ill adults with confirmed or probable pH1N1 (16 April 2009-12 April 2010), we abstracted data on demographics, co-morbidities, acute physiology, AKI (defined by RIFLE criteria for Injury or Failure), treatments in the intensive care unit, and clinical outcomes. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations between clinical characteristics and the outcomes of AKI, RRT, and hospital mortality.
We included 562 patients with pH1N1-related critical illness (479 [85.2%] confirmed, 83 [14.8%] probable]: mean age 48.0 years, 53.4% female, and 13.3% aboriginal. Common co-morbidities included obesity, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. AKI occurred in 60.9%, with RIFLE categories of Injury (23.0%) and Failure (37.9%). Independent predictors of AKI included obesity (OR 2.94; 95%CI, 1.75-4.91), chronic kidney disease (OR 4.50; 95%CI, 1.46-13.82), APACHE II score (OR per 1-unit increase 1.06; 95%CI, 1.03-1.09), and P(a)O2/F(i)O2 ratio (OR per 10-unit increase 0.98; 95%CI, 0.95-1.00). Of patients with AKI, 24.9% (85/342) received RRT and 25.8% (85/329) died. Independent predictors of RRT were obesity (OR 2.25; 95% CI, 1.14-4.44), day 1 mechanical ventilation (OR 4.09; 95% CI, 1.21-13.84), APACHE II score (OR per 1-unit increase 1.07; 95% CI, 1.03-1.12), and day 1 creatinine (OR per 10 µmol/L increase, 1.06; 95%CI, 1.03-1.10). Development of AKI was not independently associated with hospital mortality.
The incidence of AKI and RRT utilization were high among Canadian patients with critical illness due to pH1N1.
Notes
Cites: Crit Care. 2004 Aug;8(4):R204-1215312219
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1985 Oct;13(10):818-293928249
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Dec 14;182(18):1981-721059773
Cites: Pediatr Nephrol. 2011 Jan;26(1):153-420711739
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Nov;5(11):1916-2120671226
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 2010 Dec 14;411(23-24):2040-220816950
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010 Jul 1;182(1):41-820203241
Cites: Can J Anaesth. 2010 Mar;57(3):240-720082167
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2010 May;55(5):848-5520303633
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2010 May;38(5):1360-920308884
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Mar 9;182(4):349-5520159893
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2010 Mar;55(3):61520189052
Cites: Crit Care. 2009;13(5):R14819747383
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Nov 12;361(20):1925-3419815860
Cites: Am J Med. 2012 Jun;125(6):585-9322516564
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2012 Mar 26;172(6):467-7422412076
Cites: J Crit Care. 2011 Dec;26(6):577-8521489748
Cites: Crit Care. 2011;15(1):R6621342489
Cites: J Ren Care. 2011 Sep;37(3):128-3321810194
Cites: Am J Nephrol. 2011;34(1):1-821625080
Cites: Anaesthesia. 2011 Aug;66(8):738-4221539531
Cites: Ren Fail. 2011;33(4):450-121426246
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2011 May;37(5):763-721394631
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2011 May;37(5):768-7421394630
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2011 May;37(5):880-121394626
Cites: Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl. 2011 Jan;22(1):83-921196619
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 1996 Jul;22(7):707-108844239
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Aug 17;294(7):813-816106006
Cites: BMJ. 2007 Oct 20;335(7624):806-817947786
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2008 Feb;36(2):610-718216610
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2008 Apr;23(4):1203-1017962378
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Aug 13;361(7):680-919564631
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Sep 16;302(11):1179-8519755696
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Nov 4;302(17):1872-919822627
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Nov 4;302(17):1888-9519822628
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Nov 4;302(17):1863-419887664
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Nov 4;302(17):1896-90219887665
PubMed ID
23763900 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute stroke care during the first phase of COVID-19 pandemic in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310963
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2021 Apr; 143(4):349-354
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Apr-2021
Author
Espen Saxhaug Kristoffersen
Silje Holt Jahr
Kashif Waqar Faiz
Anette Margrethe Storstein
Bendik Slagsvold Winsvold
Else Charlotte Sandset
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2021 Apr; 143(4):349-354
Date
Apr-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
COVID-19 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Communicable Disease Control - methods - trends
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics - prevention & control
Stroke - epidemiology - therapy
Stroke Rehabilitation - methods - trends
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate how the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic affected the hospital stroke management and research in Norway.
All neurological departments with a Stroke Unit in Norway (n = 17) were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey. The study focused on the first lockdown period, and all questions were thus answered in regard to the period between 12 March and 15 April 2020.
The responder rate was 94% (16/17). Eighty-one % (13/16) reported that the pandemic affected their department, and 63% (10/16) changed their stroke care pathways. The number of new acute admissions in terms of both strokes and stroke mimics decreased at all 16 departments. Fewer patients received thrombolysis and endovascular treatment, and multidisciplinary stroke rehabilitation services were less available. The mandatory 3 months of follow-up of stroke patients was postponed at 73% of the hospitals. All departments conducting stroke research reported a stop in ongoing projects.
In Norway, hospital-based stroke care and research were impacted during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, with likely repercussions for patient care and outcomes. In the future, stroke departments will require contingency plans in order to protect the entire stroke treatment chain.
PubMed ID
33421104 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation of a Russian population to SARS-CoV-2: Asymptomatic course, comorbidities, mortality, and other respiratory viruses - A reply to Fear versus Data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305323
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2020 Oct; 56(4):106093
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Oct-2020
Author
Konstantin S Sharov
Author Affiliation
Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address: const.sharov@mail.ru.
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2020 Oct; 56(4):106093
Date
Oct-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asymptomatic Diseases
Betacoronavirus - pathogenicity
COVID-19
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Coronavirus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
SARS-CoV-2
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Abstract
This study was conducted to assess the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Russia and the adaptation of the population to the virus in March to June 2020. Two groups were investigated: 1) 12 082 individuals already proven positive for SARS-CoV-2 (clinical information was studied); 2) 7864+4458 individuals with suspected respiratory infections (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] tests and clinical information were studied). In the latter, SARS-CoV-2-positive individuals comprised 5.37% in March and 11.42% in June 2020. Several viral co-infections were observed for SARS-CoV-2. Rhinoviruses accounted for the largest proportion of co-infections (7.91% of samples were SARS-CoV-2-positive); followed by respiratory syncytial virus (7.03%); adenoviruses (4.84%); metapneumoviruses (3.29%); parainfluenza viruses (2.42%); enterovirus D68 (1.10%) and other viruses (entero-, echo-, parecho-) (
PubMed ID
32653618 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation to SARS-CoV-2 under stress: Role of distorted information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305689
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 2020 Sep; 50(9):e13294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2020
Author
Konstantin S Sharov
Author Affiliation
Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 2020 Sep; 50(9):e13294
Date
Sep-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Health Care Surveys - methods
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Information Dissemination
Male
Mass Media - statistics & numerical data
Medical Informatics
Moscow
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia, Viral - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Stress, Physiological
Workload - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Since the time of global SARS-CoV-2 spread across the earth in February 2020, most of countries faced the problem of massive stress of their healthcare systems. In many cases, the structural stress was a result of incorrect allocation of medical care resources. In turn, this misallocation resulted from fear and apprehensions that superseded thorough calculations. A key role in exacerbating the healthcare sector overburdening was played by misleading information on the virus and disease caused by it. In the current paper, we study the situation in Russian healthcare system and advance recommendations how to avoid further crises.
(a) Surveying the medical personnel (231 doctors, 317 nurses and 355 ambulance medical workers of lower levels) in five hospitals and six ambulance centres in Moscow. (b) Content analysis of 3164 accounts in Russian segment of social networks (VKontakte, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Odnoklassniki); official and unofficial media (TV, informational webpages).
We revealed positive-feedback loop that threatened the sustainability of Russian care sector. The main knot was occupied by incorrect/exaggerated media coverage of COVID-19. General public scared by misinformation in media and social networks, started to panic. This negative social background undermined the productivity of a significant part of medical workers who were afraid of COVID-19 patients.
The most serious problems of Russian healthcare sector related to COVID-19 pandemic, were informational problems. The exaggerated information on COVID-19 had big negative influence upon Russian society and healthcare system, despite SARS-CoV-2 relatively low epidemiological hazard.
PubMed ID
32474908 View in PubMed
Less detail

414 records – page 1 of 42.