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122 records – page 1 of 13.

Source
CANNT J. 2005 Apr-Jun;15(2):8; author reply 8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ken Roberts
Source
CANNT J. 2005 Apr-Jun;15(2):8; author reply 8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives
Canada
Humans
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic
Renal Dialysis - nursing
Notes
Comment On: CANNT J. 2005 Jan-Mar;15(1):20-415909773
PubMed ID
16050362 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age differences in goals: implications for health promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150663
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2009 May;13(3):336-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Xin Zhang
Helene Fung
Bob Ho-hong Ching
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2009 May;13(3):336-48
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada
Choice Behavior
Female
Goals
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Intention
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Pamphlets
Persuasive Communication
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Socioemotional selectivity theory postulates that, as people age, they prioritize emotionally meaningful goals. This study investigated whether these age differences in goals are reflected in how younger (aged 18-36, n = 111) and older adults (aged 62-86, n = 104) evaluated, remembered information from and were persuaded by health messages.
Participants were randomly assigned to read health pamphlets with identical factual information but emphasizing emotional or non-emotional goals.
Findings showed that health messages that emphasized emotional goals, but not those that emphasized future-oriented or neutral goals, were better remembered, were evaluated more positively and led to greater behavioral changes among older adults, but not younger adults.
These findings suggest that health messages targeting older adults may be more effective if they are framed in ways that emphasize love and caring.
PubMed ID
19484597 View in PubMed
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Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial (ADAPT): a randomized theory-based efficacy trial for adults with type 2 diabetes--rationale, design, recruitment, evaluation, and dissemination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146122
Source
Trials. 2010;11:4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Kerry S Courneya
Ronald J Sigal
Jeffrey A Johnson
Nicholas Birkett
David Lau
Kim Raine
Steven T Johnson
Nandini Karunamuni
Author Affiliation
School of Education, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW Australia. ron.plotnikoff@newcastle.edu.au
Source
Trials. 2010;11:4
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - instrumentation
Alberta
Behavior Therapy
Biological Markers - blood
Counseling
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - psychology - therapy
Exercise Therapy - methods
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Selection
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Telephone
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The primary aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three physical activity (PA) behavioural intervention strategies in a sample of adults with type 2 diabetes.
Participants (N = 287) were randomly assigned to one of three groups consisting of the following intervention strategies: (1) standard printed PA educational materials provided by the Canadian Diabetes Association [i.e., Group 1/control group)]; (2) standard printed PA educational materials as in Group 1, pedometers, a log book and printed PA information matched to individuals' PA stage of readiness provided every 3 months (i.e., Group 2); and (3) PA telephone counseling protocol matched to PA stage of readiness and tailored to personal characteristics, in addition to the materials provided in Groups 1 and 2 (i.e., Group 3). PA behaviour measured by the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire and related social-cognitive measures were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18-months (i.e., 6-month follow-up). Clinical (biomarkers) and health-related quality of life assessments were conducted at baseline, 12-months, and 18-months. Linear Mixed Model (LMM) analyses will be used to examine time-dependent changes from baseline across study time points for Groups 2 and 3 relative to Group 1.
ADAPT will determine whether tailored but low-cost interventions can lead to sustainable increases in PA behaviours. The results may have implications for practitioners in designing and implementing theory-based physical activity promotion programs for this population.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00221234.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20067626 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alcohol information--problems, possibilities and attempts for renewing]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13319
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Aug 28;71(35):3153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-1974
Author
L. Björklund
I. Blomberg
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Aug 28;71(35):3153-7
Date
Aug-28-1974
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Health education
Humans
Pamphlets
Persuasive Communication
Schools
Sweden
PubMed ID
4422806 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analyzing theoretical mechanisms of physical activity behavior change in breast cancer survivors: results from the activity promotion (ACTION) trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158234
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2008 Apr;35(2):150-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Jeffrey K H Vallance
Kerry S Courneya
Ronald C Plotnikoff
John R Mackey
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, E-488 Van Vliet Centre, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G-2H9.
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2008 Apr;35(2):150-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Behavior Therapy
Body Composition
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Combined Modality Therapy
Culture
Exercise - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Intention
Middle Aged
Motivation
Neoplasm Staging
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
We previously reported that a physical activity (PA) behavior change intervention based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) increased PA and quality of life in breast cancer survivors.
To examine the effects of our interventions on TPB variables and to determine if PA at 12 weeks follow-up was mediated by TPB variables at 4 weeks.
Breast cancer survivors (N = 377) were randomly assigned to receive either a standard public health recommendation for PA (SR group), a step pedometer alone, or one of two TPB-based behavior change interventions consisting of print materials (alone or combined with a step pedometer). For the purpose of this study, we compared the two TPB-based intervention groups (INT group) to the SR group.
Compared to the SR group, the INT group reported more favorable changes in instrumental attitude (mean difference = 0.13; 95% CI = -0.01 to 0.23; d = 0.19; p = 0.077), intention (mean difference = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.56; d = 0.33; p = 0.006), and planning (mean difference = 0.39; 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.73; d = 0.26; p = 0.027). Mediation analyses indicated that both planning and intention partially mediated the effects of the intervention on PA at 12 weeks.
Our TPB-based behavior change intervention resulted in small improvements in the TPB constructs that partially mediated the effects of our intervention on PA behavior. Additional research with the TPB is warranted.
PubMed ID
18347895 View in PubMed
Less detail

An epilepsy questionnaire study of knowledge and attitudes in Canadian college students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189816
Source
Epilepsia. 2002 Jun;43(6):652-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
G Bryan Young
Paul Derry
Ingrid Hutchinson
Verity John
Suzan Matijevic
Lisa Parrent
Samuel Wiebe
Author Affiliation
The Epilepsy Unit, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada. bryan.young@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Epilepsia. 2002 Jun;43(6):652-8
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Data Collection
Employment
Epilepsy - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Occupations
Pamphlets
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Students - psychology
Abstract
Controversy exists about the relation of societal knowledge and attitudes regarding epilepsy. We conducted a survey to examine knowledge and attitudes, to note gender and occupational influences, and to examine the effect of an informational brochure.
We administered a standardized questionnaire that noted demographics and examined knowledge and attitudes regarding epilepsy and persons with epilepsy, respectively, to a wide variety of Canadian college students. In a separate class we gave every other student a brochure regarding epilepsy and then administered the questionnaire to both the naïve and brochure-exposed students.
Knowledge was patchy and weakest for the approximate prevalence of epilepsy in the population, hereditary epilepsy and several other etiologies, recognition of nonconvulsive seizures as a type of epilepsy, and knowledge of antiepileptic drug-induced teratogenicity. In contrast, attitudes were more uniformly favorable. However, 11 and 14%, respectively, showed negative bias against persons with epilepsy having children and equal opportunity for occupational employment. Women were slightly but significantly more tolerant than men. The brochure-exposed group showed better knowledge but equivalent attitudes compared with the naïve group.
Results compare favorably with surveys in other countries. Although knowledge was patchy, it could be easily improved on with an educational brochure. Attitudes were positive but show some discrepancies from knowledge and a gender effect.
PubMed ID
12060026 View in PubMed
Less detail

An evaluation of breastfeeding promotion literature: does it really promote breastfeeding?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221961
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):24-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
R K Valaitis
E. Shea
Author Affiliation
McMaster University School of Nursing, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):24-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Breast Feeding
Canada
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Guidelines as Topic - standards
Health Education - standards
Health Promotion - standards
Humans
Pamphlets
Reading
Teaching Materials - standards
World Health Organization
Abstract
Breastfeeding pamphlets are being produced for new mothers by both commercial and nonprofit sources in increasing quantities. A regional lactation committee decided to evaluate these materials on the basis of accuracy, degree of positive approach to breastfeeding, readability and compliance with the WHO/UNICEF Code on the Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes. Results indicate that materials produced by non-profit sources scored higher in positive approach accuracy and WHO Code compliance compared with commercial sources. Only 2 of 22 pamphlets in the sample were written within the recommended reading level of Grade 5-8. None of the materials met all of the criteria for good promotional breastfeeding literature.
PubMed ID
8500052 View in PubMed
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[Attitude of the population to mailed health information. Evaluation of a health education effort under the cardiovascular project in Sogn and Fjordane]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74023
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1987 Oct 10;107(28):2414-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-1987

Breast screening: the facts--or maybe not.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90270
Source
BMJ. 2009;338:b86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Gøtzsche Peter C
Hartling Ole J
Nielsen Margrethe
Brodersen John
Jørgensen Karsten Juhl
Author Affiliation
Nordic Cochrane Centre, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. pcg@cochrane.dk
Source
BMJ. 2009;338:b86
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Mass Screening - adverse effects - methods
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 2009;338:b95719273512
PubMed ID
19174442 View in PubMed
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122 records – page 1 of 13.