Skip header and navigation

Refine By

71 records – page 1 of 8.

The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure management guidelines update: focus on sleep apnea, renal dysfunction, mechanical circulatory support, and palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134302
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Publication Type
Article
Author
Robert S McKelvie
Gordon W Moe
Anson Cheung
Jeannine Costigan
Anique Ducharme
Estrellita Estrella-Holder
Justin A Ezekowitz
John Floras
Nadia Giannetti
Adam Grzeslo
Karen Harkness
George A Heckman
Jonathan G Howlett
Simon Kouz
Kori Leblanc
Elizabeth Mann
Eileen O'Meara
Miroslav Rajda
Vivek Rao
Jessica Simon
Elizabeth Swiggum
Shelley Zieroth
J Malcolm O Arnold
Tom Ashton
Michel D'Astous
Paul Dorian
Haissam Haddad
Debra L Isaac
Marie-Hélène Leblanc
Peter Liu
Bruce Sussex
Heather J Ross
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. robert.mckelvie@phri.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Heart-Assist Devices
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Palliative Care - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Societies, Medical
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Focused Update reviews the recently published clinical trials that will potentially impact on management. Also reviewed is the less studied but clinically important area of sleep apnea. Finally, patients with advanced HF represent a group of patients who pose major difficulties to clinicians. Advanced HF therefore is examined from the perspectives of HF complicated by renal failure, the role of palliative care, and the role of mechanical circulatory support (MCS). All of these topics are reviewed from a perspective of practical applications. Important new studies have demonstrated in less symptomatic HF patients that cardiac resynchronization therapy will be of benefit. As well, aldosterone receptor antagonists can be used with benefit in less symptomatic HF patients. The important role of palliative care and the need to address end-of-life issues in advanced HF are emphasized. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of sleep apnea complicating the course of HF and the role of a sleep study for the proper assessment and management of the conditon. Patients with either acute severe or chronic advanced HF with otherwise good life expectancy should be referred to a cardiac centre capable of providing MCS. Furthermore, patients awaiting heart transplantation who deteriorate or are otherwise not likely to survive until a donor organ is found should be referred for MCS.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;27(6):871.e721885242
PubMed ID
21601772 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advanced cancer patients' self-assessed physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from hospital general wards--a questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125804
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2012 Sep;21(5):667-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
L. Soelver
B. Oestergaard
S. Rydahl-Hansen
L. Wagner
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery K, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjeg Bakke 23, Copenhagen, Denmark. lsoe0012@bbh.regionh.dk
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2012 Sep;21(5):667-76
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Diarrhea - etiology - therapy
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, General - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - psychology - therapy
Pain - etiology
Pain Management - standards
Palliative Care - standards
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - etiology - therapy
Terminally ill
Abstract
Most cancer patients receiving life-prolonging or palliative treatment are offered non-specialist palliative services. There is a lack of knowledge about their problem profile. The aim of this article is to describe the incidence of patient-reported physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from general hospital wards and health staff's reported intervention. A prospective study was undertaken over 12 months, where advanced cancer patients completed a patient questionnaire, EORTC QLQ C15-PAL, on admission (n= 97) and discharge (n= 46). The incidences of the problems were dichotomised in intensity categories. The average number of 'clinically relevant problems' on admission was 5 (SD 2) and on discharge 4 (SD 2). A Wilcoxon signed rank test showed significant change in mean score for six out of nine problem areas, but the majority of the patients did not move to the lower intensity category. The highest concurrence was between patient-reported problems and reported intervention for physical function, pain, constipation and loss of appetite. Palliative cancer patients' self-reported problem profile on admission and discharge from hospital has not previously been described and the results indicate a need to focus on improvements to palliative services and for a special service for pain and constipation that could prevent some admissions.
PubMed ID
22452383 View in PubMed
Less detail

BC network to improve palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215306
Source
CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1378
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1995
Author
M R McKenzie
Source
CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1378
Date
May-1-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesia - standards
British Columbia
Humans
Palliative Care - standards
Patient Advocacy
Notes
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 1990 Oct;5(5):273-82079577
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 1989 Sep;4(3):112-62778358
Cites: Cancer Treat Rev. 1993;19 Suppl A:29-417679317
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1991 Winter;7(4):21-51783957
Comment On: CMAJ. 1995 Feb 1;152(3):3257530161
PubMed ID
7537172 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian government urged to improve end-of-life care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197847
Source
Lancet. 2000 Jun 17;355(9221):2145
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-17-2000
Author
W. Kondro
Source
Lancet. 2000 Jun 17;355(9221):2145
Date
Jun-17-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family Leave - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Palliative Care - standards
Quality of Health Care
PubMed ID
10902641 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadians call for better palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256729
Source
CMAJ. 2014 Aug 5;186(11):E403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-5-2014
Author
Lauren Vogel
Author Affiliation
CMAJ.
Source
CMAJ. 2014 Aug 5;186(11):E403
Date
Aug-5-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Humans
Palliative Care - standards
Patient Advocacy
Public Opinion
Terminal Care - methods - standards
PubMed ID
24934891 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cancer patients need a local coordinator--is the general practitioner prepared?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17872
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Mar 4;124(5):659-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-2004

Clinical competence in palliative nursing in Norway: the importance of good care routines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144935
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2010 Feb;16(2):79, 81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Kari Slåtten
Lisbeth Fagerström
Ove Edvard Hatlevik
Author Affiliation
Diaconal University College, Oslo, Norway. kari.slaatten@ldh.no
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2010 Feb;16(2):79, 81-6
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Anxiety - nursing
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Graduate - standards
Fatigue - nursing
Humans
Mouth Diseases - nursing
Nausea - nursing
Needs Assessment
Norway
Nurse Clinicians - education - psychology
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Education Research
Pain - nursing
Palliative Care - standards
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Self-Assessment
Time Management
Abstract
This paper examines how clinical nurse specialists assessed their competences in relief of symptoms, and explores factors affecting good care routines in palliative care.
A prospective survey among 235 former post-bachelor (response rate 50.6 %) students at two university colleges in Norway.
Correlations between the measured concepts showed a medium to high correlation between all five competences. Use of care routines correlated with all the other factors. The ability to identify lack of care showed significant correlation with one concept: time available for nursing. The results from the regression analysis supported a model with good care routines as a dependent variable (F=22.59, df=91, P
PubMed ID
20220685 View in PubMed
Less detail

Complexity in caring for patients with advanced cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17942
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2004 Feb;45(4):420-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Carol Tishelman
Britt-Marie Bernhardson
Karin Blomberg
Sussanne Börjeson
Liselotte Franklin
Eva Johansson
Helena Leveälahti
Eva Sahlberg-Blom
Britt-Marie Ternestedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. carol.tishelman@omv.ki.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2004 Feb;45(4):420-9
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Focus Groups
Humans
Neoplasms - nursing
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Process - standards
Oncologic Nursing - standards
Palliative Care - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The gap between nursing research and practice is readily acknowledged in literature, with a variety of strategies suggested for reducing this gap. It is necessary not only to address problems of research implementation in practice, but also to find strategies that strengthen the influence of practitioners on research agendas through more collaborative relationships in order to have an impact on care of patients. A multi-centre research project was therefore initiated by two universities and three health care facilities, aiming to improve quality of care for patients with advanced cancer through a knowledge-exchange programme between nurse researchers, practitioners and students. AIM: The aim of this article is to explore how clinical staff reason about care provision for patients with advanced cancer, through analysis of 20 focus group discussions conducted with staff in three different health care facilities in two Swedish cities. An initial analysis based on grounded theory was complemented with consideration of the interactive process in the focus group discussions, and carried out by a team consisting of senior nurse researchers, clinical experts and nursing instructors. FINDINGS: The findings of the focus group discussions emphasize the complexity of caregiving for patients with advanced cancer. The tension between caregiving ideals and limits imposed by the realities of caregiving in today's health system were striking. Practitioners discussed the organization of care, different constellations of relationships between patients, family members and professionals, and theoretical and experiential knowledge as equally important aspects in dealing with all concrete situations in daily practice. The importance of reflective practice, use of self and ethical reasoning also permeated the focus group discussions. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight an integrated need both to influence organizational structures and working relationships, along with increasing knowledge, if sustainable change is to be effected.
PubMed ID
14756836 View in PubMed
Less detail

Current use of guidelines, protocols, and care pathways for symptom management in hospice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181773
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2004 Jan-Feb;21(1):51-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Daniel C Johnson
Cordt T Kassner
Jean S Kutner
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, USA.
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2004 Jan-Feb;21(1):51-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Critical Pathways
Evidence-Based Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospice Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Palliative Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
United States
Abstract
Evidence-based guidelines or care pathways for symptom management could provide a means to reduce symptom distress in dying patients. We surveyed directors of nursing from hospices affiliated with the Population-based Palliative Care Research Network (PoPCRN) regarding their hospices' current use of and attitudes toward written symptom management materials. A majority (53/78, 68 percent) of participating hospices reported use of written materials, such as guidelines, protocols, or care pathways, for one or more symptoms. Materials were based on multiple sources and varied from simple medication orders to more comprehensive, multicategory symptom management resources. Regardless of the composition, these materials were perceived as helpful. Given this favorable view, variations in the use and content of written materials may signify an opportunity to decrease symptom distress in hospice through the implementation of evidence-based symptom management resources.
PubMed ID
14748524 View in PubMed
Less detail

71 records – page 1 of 8.