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[About formation of actual comprehension of palliative care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107319
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2013 May-Jun;(3):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ye S Vvedenskaya
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2013 May-Jun;(3):29-32
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
Russia
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
The article emphasizes that the palliative medical care is considered in the Federal law "On the fundamentals of health care of citizen in the Russian Federation" (2011)as one of the types of medical care of population. The Orders of delivery of palliative care to adult population and children are in the process of development to determine in perspective the formation of palliative care services in the regions. The successful development of this service needs a clear-cut definition of palliative care to formulate the corresponding tasks and contingents of patients. The Preference is to be given to the definition which considers palliative medical care as a medical care of patients with diagnosis of active incurable progressing disease at the stage when possibilities of specialized/radical treatment are exhausted or limited.
PubMed ID
24027844 View in PubMed
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Abstracts of the 5th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC). May 28-31, 2008. Trondheim, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154991
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22 Suppl 1:399-558
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22 Suppl 1:399-558
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
PubMed ID
18599557 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abstracts of the 5th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC). Trondheim, Norway. May 28-31, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156255
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22(4):397-558
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22(4):397-558
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
PubMed ID
18613345 View in PubMed
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Acting with dedication and expertise: Relatives' experience of nurses' provision of care in a palliative unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276448
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2015 Dec;13(6):1547-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Å. Grøthe
Stian Biong
E K Grov
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2015 Dec;13(6):1547-58
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Death
Family - psychology
Family Relations - psychology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Neoplasms - complications - psychology
Norway
Nurses - standards
Palliative Care - methods - standards
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Admission of a cancer patient to a palliative unit when near the final stage of their disease trajectory undoubtedly impacts their relatives. The aim of our study was to illuminate and interpret relatives' lived experiences of health personnel's provision of care in a palliative ward.
A phenomenological/hermeneutic approach was employed that was inspired by the philosophical tradition of Heidegger and Ricoeur and further developed by Lindseth and Nordberg. The perspectives of the narrator and the text were interpreted by highlighting relatives' views on a situation in which they have to face existential challenges. The analysis was undertaken in three steps: naïve reading, structural analysis, and comprehensive understanding, including the authors' professional experiences and theoretical background.
Six subthemes appeared: the dying person, the bubble, the sight, the cover, the provision for children's needs, and the availability of immediate help. These components were further constructed into three themes: the meaning of relating, the meaning of action, and the meaning of resources. Our comprehensive understanding of the results suggests that the most important theme is "acting with dedication and expertise."
The following aspects are crucial for relatives of cancer patients hospitalized in a palliative ward: time and existence, family dynamics, and care adjusted to the situation. Our study results led to reflections on the impact of how nurses behave when providing care to patients during the palliative phase, and how they interact with relatives in this situation. We found that cancer patients in a palliative unit most appreciate nurses who act with dedication and expertise.
PubMed ID
24182691 View in PubMed
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Activities of counsellors in a hospice/palliative care environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191781
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M. Thompson
C. Rose
W. Wainwright
L. Mattar
M. Scanlan
Author Affiliation
Victoria Hospice Society, Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Hospices
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - methods
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotherapy - methods
Social Support
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This study examined activities related to the provision of psychosocial care by counsellors in the hospice/palliative care setting. A qualitative design using written reports was used in an urban Canadian hospice/palliative care program. A convenient sample of 13 counsellors indicated the activities they typically performed in their work with patients and families. Thematic analysis of the activities directly related to patient and family care was performed and then validated by presenting these activities back to the counsellors in a group setting. Seven themes resulted: 1) companioning; 2) psychosocial assessment, planning, and evaluation; 3) counselling interventions; 4) facilitation and advocacy; 5) patient and family education; 6) consultation and reporting; and 7) team support. These thematic findings confirmed those of previous studies and also highlighted two additional findings. Team support was seen as an activity that directly affected client care, and there was a strong emphasis on the activity of companioning the dying and their families. Also discussed are implications of these results, as well as suggestions for further research.
PubMed ID
11813339 View in PubMed
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[A "good death" needs to be discussed. A study of patients with acute myeloid leukemia demonstrates the value of palliative care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17983
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Dec 4;100(49):4072-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-4-2003
Author
Ann Marie Stalfelt
Author Affiliation
Hematologiska sektionen, medicinkliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Orebro. annmarie.stalfelt@orebroll.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Dec 4;100(49):4072-7
Date
Dec-4-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Death
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - drug therapy - nursing - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - methods - standards
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Social Support
Terminal Care - methods - standards
Abstract
The incidence of AML in Sweden is 5.4/100,000, i.e. 300 persons a year. About 70% of the patients die from their disease. In a retrospective study of medical journals of 106 patients with AML, who had died 1995-1997 in five selected hospitals in Sweden, the last week in life was studied. Sixty-six women and 40 men (age 19-84, mean 67) were included and 658 days of care were documented. The cause of death, the place of death, the type of care and clinical problems and symptoms were registered. We found bleeding (44%), infection (71%), pain (76%) and respiratory (59%) and psychological (64%) problems. Next of kin were often present and during the last week in life 3/4 of the patients had palliative care focusing on symptom relief and quality of life for the patients and his/her family.
PubMed ID
14717071 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of stage IV stomach cancer diagnostic and treatment results in permanently followed-up group of population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202345
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 1999;(3):22-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
V M Luk'ianov
L E Denisov
T I Ushakova
N N Vinogradova
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 1999;(3):22-4
Date
1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrectomy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Palliative Care - methods
Prognosis
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Survival Rate
Abstract
982 case records of the patients with cancer of the stomach (CS) were analyzed for the period from 1980 to 1997. Among them tumor of stage IV made up 21.1% (autopsy data were not taken into account). The main cause of late CS diagnosis was defective system of screening for CS. The survival rate of the patients with CS stage IV did not exceed 2 years. Chemotherapy in inoperable patients allowed a reliable increase of 7% to 26% in corrected survival rate during one year. Palliative operations increase the values of 1 year survival rate of patients with CS from 5% to 60%.
PubMed ID
10216352 View in PubMed
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An exploration of empowerment discourse within home-care nurses' accounts of practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137457
Source
Nurs Inq. 2011 Mar;18(1):66-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Laura M Funk
Kelli I Stajduhar
Mary Ellen Purkis
Author Affiliation
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. lmfunk@uvic.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2011 Mar;18(1):66-76
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Family Relations
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Home Nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Palliative Care - methods
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Marketing
Abstract
In this study, we explore how client and family caregiver 'empowerment' is interpreted by home-care nurses talking about their practice with palliative (and to a lesser extent, non-palliative) clients and families. We draw on secondary analysis of qualitative data collected through in-person interviews with 27 home-care nurses from a western Canadian health authority. First, we illustrate how the practice ideal of empowerment, in the sense of 'respecting autonomy and choices', can be understood as reflecting home-care nurses' needs to mitigate the emotional impact of feeling unable to effectively help palliative clients/families. Then, we illustrate how the practice ideal of empowerment, in the sense of 'promoting independence', can be understood to accomplish the need to shift responsibility for particular care tasks to clients and family members. Lastly, home-care nurses, talk about 'promoting choices' is also investigated. 'Choice' was framed narrowly with respect to allowing palliative clients and families to determine visit time and frequency. Findings are discussed in relation to the concept of 'responsibilization'.
PubMed ID
21281397 View in PubMed
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An innovative rapid response radiotherapy program to reduce waiting time for palliative radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175058
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Jan;14(1):38-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
C. Danjoux
E. Chow
A. Drossos
L. Holden
C. Hayter
M. Tsao
T. Barnes
E. Sinclair
M. Farhadian
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Jan;14(1):38-43
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cancer Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Dose Fractionation
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Ontario
Palliative Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Therapies, Investigational
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Waiting for radiation therapy (RT) in Ontario has been a major problem for the past decade. In 1996, the Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre (TSRCC) initiated a Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program (RRRP) to provide timely palliative RT for symptom relief of patients with terminal cancer.
This study reviews the clinical activity of the RRRP over the past 8 years to evaluate if we are meeting the objectives of the program.
From the TSRCC oncology patient information system (OPIS) database, we retrieved the number of patients referred to the RRRP, their demographics, diagnosis and treatment for the calendar years 1996 to 2003 inclusive. We calculated the time interval between referral to consultation, consultation to simulation and the percentage of cases who started RT on their initial consultation for all new cases referred to the RRRP.
From 1996 to 2003, the number of cases seen in consultation increased from just over 200 cases annually in the first 2 years to about 500 cases per year in the last 4 years, for a total of 3,290. There were 1,792 (54%) men and 1,498 (46%) women; median age was 69 years (range, 21-95 years). Breast, lung, genitourinary and gastrointestinal primaries accounted for over 80% of all referrals. The majority was referred for palliative treatment of symptomatic bone (70%) or brain (14%) metastases. The dose fractionation for bone metastases was a single 8-Gy fraction in 45%, 20 Gy in five fractions in 42%, 30 Gy in ten fractions in 4% and other dose fractionations in 9%. Nearly 90% were seen within 2 weeks of referral (38% within 1 week). Eighty-five percent were simulated on the day of their initial consultation. Sixty percent started their RT treatment on the day of their consultation visit. The overall median interval from referral to treatment was 8 days.
Over the past 8 years, the annual number of new cases referred to the RRRP has doubled. The overall median interval from referral to consultation was 8 days. Sixty percent were simulated, planned and started treatment on the day of their initial consultation. We therefore are meeting our goal of providing rapid access to palliative RT for symptomatic cancer patients.
PubMed ID
15856333 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic use in the last week of life in three different palliative care settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190269
Source
J Palliat Care. 2002;18(1):25-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Doreen Oneschuk
Robin Fainsinger
Donna Demoissac
Source
J Palliat Care. 2002;18(1):25-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency and types of antibiotics prescribed in the last week of life in three different palliative care settings, including an acute care hospital, tertiary palliative care unit, and three hospice units. A total of 150 consecutive patients were evaluated, 50 in each of the three settings. Twenty-nine patients (58%) in the acute hospital setting, 26 (52%) in the tertiary palliative care unit, and 11(22%) in the hospice settings were prescribed antibiotics. In the acute care and tertiary palliative care settings, the most frequent route of antibiotic administration was intravenous and, in the hospice setting, oral. We conclude that there is marked variability in the numbers and types of antibiotics prescribed in these different palliative care settings in the last week of life. The high use of intravenous antibiotics and the large number of patients who were still receiving antibiotics at the time of death indicate the need for further prospective studies.
PubMed ID
12001399 View in PubMed
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201 records – page 1 of 21.