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21 records – page 1 of 3.

[Background and perspectives of opioid analgesics for the treatment of chronic pain in cancer patients in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265129
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2015 Jan-Feb;60(1):19-25
Publication Type
Article
Author
G R Abuzarova
V E Khoronenko
R R Sarmanaeva
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2015 Jan-Feb;60(1):19-25
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics, Opioid - supply & distribution - therapeutic use
Chronic Pain - drug therapy
Drug and Narcotic Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Neoplasms - complications
Pain Management - methods - trends
Palliative Care - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Abstract
The article deals with an analysis of availability of narcotic analgesics for the patients in the Russian Federation. The analysis was based on datafrom official sources on the scopes of opioids delivery in different regions of the Russian Federation and showed an extremely limited availability of narcotic analgesics for the patients in the Russian Federation. We found that availability of narcotic analgesics in Russia is hundreds times lower than the same indexes in European countries with various level of economic activity and in the USA. The analysis showed ten most progressive Russian regions where the use of opioids in the noninvasive forms has become part of systematic clinical practice according to WHO recommendations as well as 10 ten most backward regions where these drugs are hardly used despite of high figures of case death rates from cancer. We made a list of most needed modern Russian and internationally produced drugs according to international data and personal experience. Drugs from this list can be effectually used for the chronic pain therapy in oncology. The most advanced drugs that are soon will be produced are also named. The article describes high priority measures that have already been done to improve current situation and measures to be executed in the future.
PubMed ID
26027219 View in PubMed
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Cancer surveillance and control in adolescents--similarities and contrasts between Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172572
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2006 Mar;46(3):273-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Ronald D Barr
Mark L Greenberg
Author Affiliation
Pathology and Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2006 Mar;46(3):273-7
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic - methods
Female
Health Personnel - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Palliative Care - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Papillomaviridae
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient Compliance - psychology
United States
Viral Vaccines - therapeutic use
Abstract
Opportunities for cancer prevention in adolescents range from limitation of sun exposure to the use of human papillomavirus vaccines. Those who develop malignant disease experience longer waiting times for diagnosis and treatment than do children, especially when referred to adult treatment centers, and they are less frequently enrolled in clinical trials. More attention to developmentally appropriate psychological support, enhancement of compliance/adherence, health promotion, and palliative care is needed. Improving cancer surveillance and control in adolescents in North America will require co-ordinated national efforts, involving pediatric and adult health care providers, institutions, and multiple levels of government.
PubMed ID
16206210 View in PubMed
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CMAJ 2011 election survey: home/palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134811
Source
CMAJ. 2011 May 17;183(8):E459-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2011

Determinants of do-not-resuscitate orders in palliative home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158316
Source
J Palliat Med. 2008 Mar;11(2):226-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Peter Brink
Trevor Frise Smith
Maureen Kitson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. pbrink@ahsmail.uwaterloo.ca
Source
J Palliat Med. 2008 Mar;11(2):226-32
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Advance Directives - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Case Management
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Critical Illness - mortality - therapy
Demography
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Pain - diagnosis
Pain Measurement
Palliative Care - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Resuscitation Orders
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders allow home care clients to communicate their own wishes over medical treatment decisions, helping to preserve their dignity and autonomy. To date, little is known about DNR orders in palliative home care. Basic research to identify rates of completion and determinants of DNR orders has yet to be examined in palliative home care.
The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine who in palliative home care has a DNR order as part of their advance directive.
Information on health was collected using the interRAI instrument for palliative care (interRAI PC). The sample included 470 home care clients from one community care access centre in Ontario.
This study indicated that a preference to die at home (odds ratio [OR]: 8.29, confidence interval [CI]: 4.55-15.11); close proximity to death (OR: 0.99, CI: 0.99-1.00); daily incontinence (OR: 2.74, CI: 1.05-7.16); and sleep problems (OR: 1.85, CI: 1.02-3.37) are associated with DNR orders. In addition, clients who are more accepting of their situation are 5.67 times (CI: 1.67-19.27) more likely to have a DNR in place.
This study represents an important first step to identifying issues related to DNR orders. In addition to proximity to death, incontinence, and sleep problems, acceptance of one's own situation and a preference to die at home are important determinants of DNR completion. The results imply that these discussions might often depend not only on the health of the clients but also on the clients' acceptance of their current situation and where they wish to die.
PubMed ID
18333737 View in PubMed
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[Is terminal sedation active euthanasia?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197829
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jun 10;120(15):1763-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-2000
Author
L J Materstvedt
S. Kaasa
Author Affiliation
Den Norske Kreftforening, Det medisinske fakultet Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jun 10;120(15):1763-8
Date
Jun-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Ethics, Medical
Europe
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - administration & dosage
Netherlands
Palliative Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Physician's Role
Right to Die
Scandinavia
Terminal Care
Abstract
In order to be able to discuss the issue of whether or not terminal sedation is, or may be conceived of as, a form of help in dying, one needs to be very clear as to the meaning of the terms "help in dying" and "terminal sedation". In this article, we suggest what we take to be detailed and precise definitions of the two forms of voluntary help in dying--euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Our definitions (interpretations) basically draw on the Dutch experience and understanding. The Dutch approach implies that acts of abstention, i.e., withholding and withdrawing treatment, and pain and symptom treatment with possible life-shortening effect, including terminal sedation, are to be considered "normal medical practice". Furthermore, death is seen by almost all parties as having natural causes in all of these acts. We also suggest that "palliative sedation" should substitute the expression "terminal sedation". Furthermore, we discuss on what grounds this treatment strategy may be induced, including a presentation of criteria and guidelines that must be met; the issue of documentation of the strategy; palliative sedation in the light of the ethical principle of double effect; and in what way euthanasia could be concealed as palliative sedation. In closing, we comment briefly on the phenomenon of large differences between published cohorts with regard to the frequency of use of palliative sedation. This treatment strategy is open to be challenged both clinically and ethically, and all parties would benefit from a continuous debate over the legitimacy of, and the clinical need for, palliative sedation.
PubMed ID
10904663 View in PubMed
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Legalize use of marijuana for medical purposes, MDs and patients plead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206422
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Feb 10;158(3):373-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1998
Author
C. Gray
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Feb 10;158(3):373-5
Date
Feb-10-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cannabis - therapeutic use
Humans
Legislation, Drug
Male
Palliative Care - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Phytotherapy
Abstract
As debate about the legalization of marijuana continues in Canada, physicians are joining the fray. Ottawa family physician Don Kilby is working hard to make it easier for ill patients to use the marijuana that alleviates their symptoms. A recent case in Toronto indicates that the courts are starting to share these views.
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1998 May 19;158(10):1265-69614813
PubMed ID
9484265 View in PubMed
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[Manifestation to support the accused physician!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150890
Source
Lakartidningen. 2009 Mar 18-24;106(12):870
Publication Type
Article
Author
Peter Arner
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Huddinge. Peter.Arner@medhs.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2009 Mar 18-24;106(12):870
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence
Palliative Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Physicians, Women
Societies, Medical
Sweden
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
19452789 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.