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1514 records – page 1 of 152.

The 5th Nordic Congress on care of the terminally ill held in Reykjavík 5-7 June 1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203037
Source
Acta Oncol. 1998;37(7-8):741-2
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1998
Author
V. Sigurdardóttir
Author Affiliation
The Icelandic Cancer Society, Reykjavík. valgerdur@krabb.is
Source
Acta Oncol. 1998;37(7-8):741-2
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Iceland
Palliative Care
Terminally ill
PubMed ID
10050996 View in PubMed
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The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure management guidelines update: focus on sleep apnea, renal dysfunction, mechanical circulatory support, and palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134302
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Publication Type
Article
Author
Robert S McKelvie
Gordon W Moe
Anson Cheung
Jeannine Costigan
Anique Ducharme
Estrellita Estrella-Holder
Justin A Ezekowitz
John Floras
Nadia Giannetti
Adam Grzeslo
Karen Harkness
George A Heckman
Jonathan G Howlett
Simon Kouz
Kori Leblanc
Elizabeth Mann
Eileen O'Meara
Miroslav Rajda
Vivek Rao
Jessica Simon
Elizabeth Swiggum
Shelley Zieroth
J Malcolm O Arnold
Tom Ashton
Michel D'Astous
Paul Dorian
Haissam Haddad
Debra L Isaac
Marie-Hélène Leblanc
Peter Liu
Bruce Sussex
Heather J Ross
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. robert.mckelvie@phri.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Heart-Assist Devices
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Palliative Care - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Societies, Medical
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Focused Update reviews the recently published clinical trials that will potentially impact on management. Also reviewed is the less studied but clinically important area of sleep apnea. Finally, patients with advanced HF represent a group of patients who pose major difficulties to clinicians. Advanced HF therefore is examined from the perspectives of HF complicated by renal failure, the role of palliative care, and the role of mechanical circulatory support (MCS). All of these topics are reviewed from a perspective of practical applications. Important new studies have demonstrated in less symptomatic HF patients that cardiac resynchronization therapy will be of benefit. As well, aldosterone receptor antagonists can be used with benefit in less symptomatic HF patients. The important role of palliative care and the need to address end-of-life issues in advanced HF are emphasized. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of sleep apnea complicating the course of HF and the role of a sleep study for the proper assessment and management of the conditon. Patients with either acute severe or chronic advanced HF with otherwise good life expectancy should be referred to a cardiac centre capable of providing MCS. Furthermore, patients awaiting heart transplantation who deteriorate or are otherwise not likely to survive until a donor organ is found should be referred for MCS.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;27(6):871.e721885242
PubMed ID
21601772 View in PubMed
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A.A.R.N. position statement palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240083
Source
AARN News Lett. 1984 Oct;40(9):6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1984
Source
AARN News Lett. 1984 Oct;40(9):6-7
Date
Oct-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Humans
Nursing Care
Palliative Care
Terminal Care
PubMed ID
6208741 View in PubMed
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Abdominal operations for intraabdominal metastases from extraabdominal primary tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25233
Source
J Surg Oncol. 1990 Apr;43(4):209-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
J T Mäkelä
H O Kiviniemi
K A Haukipuro
S T Laitinen
Author Affiliation
Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
J Surg Oncol. 1990 Apr;43(4):209-13
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - surgery
Abdominal Neoplasms - mortality - secondary - surgery
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Postoperative Complications
Survival Rate
Abstract
Forty consecutive patients with an extraabdominal primary tumor, later treated surgically for intraabdominal problems, were investigated. The most common causes of abdominal operations were intestinal obstruction (N = 17), intraabdominal tumor mass (N = 8), and intraabdominal hemorrhage (N = 5). The overall postoperative mortality was 25%, morbidity 48%, median survival 3 months, and cumulative 5 year survival 3%. The mortality after emergency procedures, 67%, was significantly higher (P less than 0.01) than after elective operations, 18%. Conditions requiring enterostomy (N = 14) were associated with a mortality of 36%, whereas the figures in resected (N = 13) and bypassed (N = 7) patients were 14% and 17%, respectively. Wound infection (N = 5) and pulmonary infection (N = 5) were the most common complications, and pulmonary infection was fatal in three of the five cases. Of the patients, 22 (55%) were discharged from hospital to their home; ten (25%) of them had postoperatively a 3 month relief of cancer symptoms and four (10%) a 6 month relief. Nine patients (25%) have survived for over 1 year and one (3%) for over 5 years. It is concluded that abdominal procedures seldom prevent further cancer growth within these patients and that symptoms are relieved only in one in every four patients. According to strict criteria, these operations are useful and can add to patient comfort.
PubMed ID
1691417 View in PubMed
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[About formation of actual comprehension of palliative care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107319
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2013 May-Jun;(3):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ye S Vvedenskaya
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2013 May-Jun;(3):29-32
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
Russia
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
The article emphasizes that the palliative medical care is considered in the Federal law "On the fundamentals of health care of citizen in the Russian Federation" (2011)as one of the types of medical care of population. The Orders of delivery of palliative care to adult population and children are in the process of development to determine in perspective the formation of palliative care services in the regions. The successful development of this service needs a clear-cut definition of palliative care to formulate the corresponding tasks and contingents of patients. The Preference is to be given to the definition which considers palliative medical care as a medical care of patients with diagnosis of active incurable progressing disease at the stage when possibilities of specialized/radical treatment are exhausted or limited.
PubMed ID
24027844 View in PubMed
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Abstracts of the 5th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC). May 28-31, 2008. Trondheim, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154991
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22 Suppl 1:399-558
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22 Suppl 1:399-558
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
PubMed ID
18599557 View in PubMed
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Abstracts of the 5th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC). Trondheim, Norway. May 28-31, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156255
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22(4):397-558
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22(4):397-558
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
PubMed ID
18613345 View in PubMed
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Access to outreach specialist palliative care teams among cancer patients in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114285
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Aug;16(8):951-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Mette Asbjoern Neergaard
Anders Bonde Jensen
Frede Olesen
Peter Vedsted
Author Affiliation
The Palliative Team, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. mettneer@rm.dk
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Aug;16(8):951-7
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Community-Institutional Relations
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - physiopathology - therapy
Palliative Care - manpower - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Registries
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialization
Terminal Care - manpower - organization & administration
Young Adult
Abstract
Equal access to end-of-life care is important. However, social inequality has been found in relation to place-of-death. The question is whether social and economic factors play a role in access to specialist palliative care services.
The study analyzed the association between access to outreach specialist palliative care teams (SPCTs) and socioeconomic characteristics of Danish cancer patients who died of their cancer.
The study was a population-based, cross-sectional register study. We identified 599 adults who had died of cancer from March 1 to November 30, 2006, in Aarhus County, Denmark. Data from health registers were retrieved and linked based on the unique personal identifier number.
Multivariate analysis with adjustment for age, gender, and general practitioner (GP) involvement showed a higher probability of contact with an SPCT among immigrants and descendants of immigrants than among people of Danish origin (prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.55; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04;2.31) and among married compared to unmarried patients (PR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01;1.54). The trends were most marked among women.
We found an association between females, married patients, and female immigrants and their descendants and access to an SPCT in Denmark. However, no association with the examined economic factor was found. Need for specialized health care, which is supposed to be the main reason for access to an SPCT, may be related to economic imbalance; and despite the relative equality found, SPCT access may not be equal for all Danish residents. Further research into social and economic consequences in palliative care services is warranted.
PubMed ID
23631614 View in PubMed
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Access to palliative care services in hospital: a matter of being in the right hospital. Hospital charts study in a Canadian city.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133654
Source
Palliat Med. 2012 Jan;26(1):89-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Joachim Cohen
Donna M Wilson
Amy Thurston
Rod MacLeod
Luc Deliens
Author Affiliation
Ghent University & Vrije Universiteit Brussel, End-of-Life Care Research Group, Brussels, Belgium. jcohen@vub.ac.be
Source
Palliat Med. 2012 Jan;26(1):89-94
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Hospital Planning
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - organization & administration - standards
Referral and Consultation - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to palliative care (PC) is a major need worldwide. Using hospital charts of all patients who died over one year (April 2008-March 2009) in two mid-sized hospitals of a large Canadian city, similar in size and function and operated by the same administrative group, this study examined which patients who could benefit from PC services actually received these services and which ones did not, and compared their care characteristics. A significantly lower proportion (29%) of patients dying in hospital 2 (without a PC unit and reliant on a visiting PC team) was referred to PC services as compared to in hospital 1 (with a PC unit; 68%). This lower referral likelihood was found for all patient groups, even among cancer patients, and remained after controlling for patient mix. Referral was strongly associated with having cancer and younger age. Referral to PC thus seems to depend, at least in part, on the coincidence of being admitted to the right hospital. This finding suggests that establishing PC units or a team of committed PC providers in every hospital could increase referral rates and equity of access to PC services. The relatively lower access for older and non-cancer patients and technology use in hospital PC services require further attention.
PubMed ID
21680750 View in PubMed
Less detail

1514 records – page 1 of 152.