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Abstracts of the 5th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC). Trondheim, Norway. May 28-31, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156255
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22(4):397-558
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22(4):397-558
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
PubMed ID
18613345 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Apr 10;117(9):1335-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1997
Author
S. Førre
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Apr 10;117(9):1335-6
Date
Apr-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Norway
Palliative Care
PubMed ID
9182372 View in PubMed
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Abstracts of the 5th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC). May 28-31, 2008. Trondheim, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154991
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22 Suppl 1:399-558
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22 Suppl 1:399-558
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
PubMed ID
18599557 View in PubMed
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Improved data validity in the Swedish Register of Palliative Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287189
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(10):e0186804
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Lisa Martinsson
Per-Anders Heedman
Staffan Lundström
Bertil Axelsson
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(10):e0186804
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish Register of Palliative Care (SRPC) is a national quality register that collects data about end-of-life care from healthcare providers that care for dying patients. Data are used for quality control and research. Data are mainly collected with an end-of-life questionnaire (ELQ), which is completed by healthcare staff after the death of a patient. A previous validity assessment of the ELQ showed insufficient validity in some items including symptom relief. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of the revised ELQ.
Data from 100 consecutive patients' medical records at two specialised palliative care units were used to complete new ELQs, which were then compared to the ELQ registrations from the SRPC for the same patients. The level of agreement was calculated for each ELQ item. To account for the possibility of the agreement occurring by chance, Cohen's kappa was calculated for suitable items. To examine the extent of registration mistakes when transferring the paper form to the web, the original paper versions of the ELQ filled out at the units were compared to data from the ELQs reported to the SRPC.
Level of agreement between ELQ registrations from the SRPC and the new ELQs based on the medical records varied between 0.55 and 1.00, where 24 items showed level of agreement above 0.80 and 9 items showed level of agreement below 0.80. Cohen's kappa with 95% confidence intervals was calculated for 24 items. The kappa values showed that two items had poor agreement, four fair agreement, 11 moderate agreement, five good agreement and two very good agreement. The level of agreement varied between 0.93 and 1.00 when comparing the ELQ registrations in the SRPC and the paper forms.
The revised ELQ contains more items with high levels of agreement between registrations in the SRPC and notes in the patients' medical records when compared to the previous version. Validating issues around symptom assessment remains a challenge in our model of quality assessment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29049396 View in PubMed
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A thematic review of the spirituality literature within palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169650
Source
J Palliat Med. 2006 Apr;9(2):464-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Shane Sinclair
Jose Pereira
Shelley Raffin
Author Affiliation
Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, University of Calgary, Canada. shane.sinclair@calgaryhealthregion.ca
Source
J Palliat Med. 2006 Apr;9(2):464-79
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Humans
Palliative Care
Spirituality
Abstract
Research related to spirituality and health has developed from relative obscurity to a thriving field of study over the last 20 years both within palliative care and within health care in general. This paper provides a descriptive review of the literature related to spirituality and health, with a special focus on spirituality within palliative and end-of-life care. CINAHL and MEDLINE were searched under the keywords "spirituality" and "palliative." The review revealed five overarching themes in the general spirituality and health literature: (1) conceptual difficulties related to the term spirituality and proposed solutions; (2) the relationship between spirituality and religion; (3) the effects of spirituality on health; (4) the subjects enrolled in spirituality-related research; and (5) the provision of spiritual care. While the spirituality literature within palliative care shared these overarching characteristics of the broader spirituality and health literature, six specific thematic areas transpired: (1) general discussions of spirituality in palliative care; (2) the spiritual needs of palliative care patients; (3) the nature of hope in palliative care; (4) tools and therapies related to spirituality; (5) effects of religion in palliative care; and (6) spirituality and palliative care professionals. The literature as it relates to these themes is summarized in this review. Spirituality is emerging largely as a concept void of religion, an instrument to be utilized in improving or maintaining health and quality of life, and focussed predominantly on the "self" largely in the form of the patient. While representing an important beginning, the authors suggest that a more integral approach needs to be developed that elicits the experiential nature of spirituality that is shared by patients, family members, and health care professionals alike.
PubMed ID
16629575 View in PubMed
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[Denmark's first research facility in palliative medicine. Organization and research strategy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205461
Source
Nord Med. 1998 May;113(5):147-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
L. Pedersen
P. Sjøgren
Author Affiliation
Palliativ medicinsk afdeling, Bispebjerg hospital, København.
Source
Nord Med. 1998 May;113(5):147-50
Date
May-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Palliative Care
Research
Abstract
Denmark's first palliative medicine research unit is now being set up at Bispebjerg Hospital, with single-room and two double-room ward. The multidisciplinary team consists of doctors, a psychologist, nurses, a physiotherapist, an ergotherapist, a medical social worker, a priest and a dietician. An out-patient facility is also being established to enable patients to choose between hospitalisation out-patient treatment or home treatment by appropriate staff. Another aspect of palliative medicine is care of the patient's family members. The intervention offered at our facility is led by a psychologist, and consists primarily of counselling. With its limited clinical opacity, the department of palliative medicine is first and foremost a research and development facility. The first chair in palliative medicine in Denmark was conferred upon the department in 1998.
PubMed ID
9617162 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 27;160(18):2673
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-1998
Author
P. Sjøgren
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 27;160(18):2673
Date
Apr-27-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Hospices
Humans
Palliative Care
PubMed ID
9599547 View in PubMed
Less detail

Symptoms and functional status of palliative care patients in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265375
Source
Br J Nurs. 2015 May 14-27;24(9):478-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bryndis Gestsdottir
Ingibjorg Hjaltadottir
Gudrun Dora Gudmannsdottir
Palmi V Jonsson
Sigridur Gunnarsdottir
Valgerdur Sigurðardottir
Source
Br J Nurs. 2015 May 14-27;24(9):478-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Palliative Care
Abstract
Palliative care patients experience many debilitating symptoms and functional loss, but few longitudinal studies on the subject are available.
To assess the symptoms and functional status of patients admitted to specialised palliative care, to investigate whether changes occur over the admission period, and to establish whether symptoms and physical and cognitive function differ, based on the service setting. In addition, to participate in the development of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument (interRAI PC).
A prospective longitudinal study (N=123) was conducted at three time points: at admission to specialised palliative care, 14 days post-admission, and at discharge or death. The interRAI PC version 8 was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used, together with the Friedman statistical test and Wilcoxon post-hoc test.
Patients experienced a wide spectrum of symptoms; the most frequent were fatigue, loss of appetite, pain, difficulty sleeping, insufficient nutritional intake and nausea. Some symptoms stayed relatively stable over time, but others increased, while physical and cognitive function decreased over time. The interRAI PC version 8 proved comprehensive and simple to use.
Patients experienced a significant symptom burden and functional loss from admission to discharge or death. Symptoms indicating progressive deterioration became more frequent and severe, while physical and cognitive function decreased at all levels. Overall, inpatients had more symptoms and functional decline than home-care patients. The interRAI PC version 8 proved valuable in collecting clinical information and detecting changes over time as other interRAI suite instruments.
PubMed ID
25978281 View in PubMed
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Russia: the State-of-the-Art of palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188543
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2002 Aug;24(2):228-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Andrei A Novik
Tatiana I Ionova
Svetlana A Kaliadina
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Research and Treatment Center, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2002 Aug;24(2):228-30
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Russia
PubMed ID
12231152 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2012 Jun;18(6):310
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Dion Smyth
Author Affiliation
Birmingham City University, Birmingham, UK.
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2012 Jun;18(6):310
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Internet
Norway
Palliative Care
Politics
PubMed ID
22885906 View in PubMed
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1516 records – page 1 of 152.