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How to support patients who are crying in palliative home care: an interview study from the nurses' perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286945
Source
Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 09;17(5):479-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
09-2016
Author
Kerstin Rydé
Katarina Hjelm
Source
Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 09;17(5):479-88
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Crying - psychology
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing - methods
Palliative Care - psychology
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Aim The aim of this study was to explore how nurses can support patients who are crying in a palliative home care context.
In palliative care the nurse has a central role in the team whose duty it is to create a sense of security and trust, as well as to give comfort and support the patients. The nurse's responsibility is to identify different needs of the patients for support and develop a relationship with them. Patients may express their pain, anxiety, fear and suffering by crying. No studies have been found which focus on how nurses can support patients who are crying in different ways and crying for different reasons.
A qualitative explorative study was performed. Semi-structured interviews were held with eight nurses aged 32-63 years (Median 40) working in Swedish palliative home care. The data were analysed using Qualitative Content analysis. Findings It was reported that the nurse should meet and confirm the patient during different types of crying episodes and should also be able to alternate between being close and physically touching the in such close contact with the patients, the nurse can provide emotional support by showing empathy, merely being present and letting the patients cry as much as they want. When the crying finally stops, the nurse can support the person by speaking with them, showing sensitivity, humility and respect for the patient's wishes. A few examples of the patients' need for information or practical support emerged. The nurse can emotionally support the person who is crying by just being present, confirming, showing empathy, offering a chance to talk and showing respect for their individual needs and the different ways they may cry.
PubMed ID
26932445 View in PubMed
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The experience of hope for informal caregivers of palliative patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170663
Source
J Palliat Care. 2005;21(4):285-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Lorraine F Holtslander
Wendy Duggleby
Allison M Williams
Karen E Wright
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2005;21(4):285-91
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Bereavement
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Morale
Negativism
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - psychology
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Social Support
Abstract
This study explored the experience of hope for informal caregivers of palliative patients. Interviews were conducted with 10 caregivers living with and providing care to a palliative patient. The interview data were analyzed using grounded theory qualitative methods. "Eroding hope" was their main concern--a result of bad days, negative messages, and experiences with the health care system. The participants dealt with eroding hope by "hanging on to hope." Hanging on to hope had four subprocesses: a) doing what you have to do, b) living in the moment, c) staying positive, and d) writing your own story. The support of friends, family, and health care professionals, and spiritually connecting with something bigger and stronger were subprocesses. These findings have application for informal caregivers providing palliative care at home, as a basis for assessment and interventions. Health care professionals need to recognize and value the experience of hope for the informal caregivers of palliative patients.
PubMed ID
16483098 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Oct 29;169(44):3774-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-29-2007
Author
Holger Rasmussen
Lisbeth Langkilde
Author Affiliation
viho@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Oct 29;169(44):3774-7
Date
Oct-29-2007
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counseling
Denmark
Family - psychology
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Terminal Care - methods
Abstract
In the WHO's definition of palliative care, social support plays an important part. When a person is dying, social issues regarding the present and future wellbeing of his/her family will often be of great concern. Social aspects of palliation can be divided into two major areas--social counselling and psycho-social work. The first concerns help to maintain an income and to establish sufficient help to enable the dying person and his/her family to live as well as possible. The second involves help to deal with the new and difficult situation for both the dying person and his/her family.
PubMed ID
18028849 View in PubMed
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Palliative care by family physicians in the 1990s. Resilience amid reform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192405
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2001 Oct;47:1989-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
F. Burge
P. McIntyre
P. Twohig
I. Cummings
D. Kaufman
G. Frager
A. Pollett
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Department of Family Medicine, Abbie J. Lane Building, 8th Floor, 5909 Veterans Memorial Lane, Halifax, NS B3H 2E2.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2001 Oct;47:1989-95
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Family - psychology
Family Practice
Female
Focus Groups
Health planning
Health Resources
Humans
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement
Male
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Pain - prevention & control
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Physician-Patient Relations
Social Support
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
To explore issues family physicians face in providing community-based palliative care to their patients in the context of a changing health care system.
Focus groups.
Small ( 50,000) communities in Nova Scotia.
Twenty-five men and women physicians with varying years of practice experience in both solo and group practices.
A semistructured approach was used, asking physicians to reflect on recent palliative care experiences in order to explore issues of care.
Five themes emerged from the discussions: resources needed, availability of family support, time and money supporting physicians' activities, symptom control for patients, and physicians' emotional reactions to caring for dying patients.
With downsizing of hospitals and greater emphasis on community-based care, the issues identified in this study will need attention, particularly in designing an integrated service delivery model for palliative care.
Notes
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1990 Autumn;6(3):21-71700094
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1998 Autumn;14(3):8-149770916
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1995 Mar;41:362-97773020
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1992 Spring;8(1):18-231583562
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Feb 1;152(3):337-407828097
Cites: Fam Pract Res J. 1994 Mar;14(1):19-288048345
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Feb 1;152(3):361-77530164
PubMed ID
11723593 View in PubMed
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Coping strategies, emotional outcomes and spiritual quality of life in palliative care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161417
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 Jun;13(6):291-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Jean-Francois Desbiens
Lise Fillion
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Laval University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 Jun;13(6):291-300
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Bereavement
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control
Emotions
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff - psychology
Palliative Care
Quality of Life
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Social Support
Spirituality
Abstract
It is in accompanying the dying that palliative care nurses say they find meaning in their work. To further explore this phenomenon, consideration of coping strategies is proposed. The main objective of this correlational study was to describe the association between coping strategies (using a revised version of the COPE scale (Carver et al, 1999)), emotional outcomes (distress and vigour; profile of mood states (POMS)), and spiritual quality of life (using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Spiritual Wellbeing Scale (FACIT-sp)). A sample of 120 nurses providing palliative care in acute care hospitals and the community in Quebec was included. Positive reinterpretation (beta=.27; p
PubMed ID
17851385 View in PubMed
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Care dependence: a struggle toward moments of respite.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92798
Source
Clin Nurs Res. 2008 Aug;17(3):220-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Eriksson Monika
Andershed Birgitta
Author Affiliation
Kärnsjukhuset Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
Source
Clin Nurs Res. 2008 Aug;17(3):220-36
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Body Image
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Neoplasms - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Respite Care - psychology
Self Concept
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe people's experiences of being dependent on others for care in their final stage of life, as well as what they felt made their experience of being dependent easier or more difficult. The phenomenological-hermeneutical method was chosen, where data collection consisted of open-ended interviews with nine people undergoing palliative care at a hospice unit or at home. The meaning of being care dependent is described via the following themes: changed relationship with oneself and with others, striving to adapt oneself to the situation, obstacles, and opportunities along the way while dependent. The result is described as an effort, a journey from independence to moments where it was possible to rest and recuperate while struggling with care dependency. Nursing staff require knowledge and understanding of experiences with care dependency to make life easier for people during increasing dependency in the final stage of life.
PubMed ID
18617709 View in PubMed
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Caring together: summary of a report submitted to Health and Welfare Canada (December, 1987). The Expert Working Group on Integrated Palliative Care for Persons with AIDS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232129
Source
J Palliat Care. 1988 Dec;4(4):76-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988

The impact of volunteering in hospice palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161124
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2007 Aug-Sep;24(4):259-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stephen Claxton-Oldfield
Jane Claxton-Oldfield
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, Mount Allison University, 49A York Street, Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada. sclaxton@mta.ca
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2007 Aug-Sep;24(4):259-63
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Career Choice
Empathy
Female
Hospice Care - organization & administration - psychology
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
New Brunswick
Palliative Care - organization & administration - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Concept
Social Support
Volunteers - psychology
Abstract
The goal of this study was to examine the impact of hospice palliative care work on volunteers' lives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 direct-patient care volunteers. More than half of the volunteers became involved in hospice palliative care because of their own experiences with family members and/or friends who have died. Most of the volunteers reported that they were different now or had changed in some way since they have been volunteering (e.g., they had grown in some way, have learned how to keep things in perspective). In addition, most of the volunteers felt that their outlook on life had changed since they started volunteering (e.g., they were more accepting of death, and they learned the importance of living one day at a time). Volunteers reported doing a number of different things to prevent compassion fatigue or burnout (e.g., reading a book, listening to music, talking to others, and taking time off from volunteering). Most of the volunteers said that they would tell anyone who might be thinking of volunteering in hospice palliative care that it is a very rewarding activity and/or that they should try it. Finally, many of the volunteers offered suggestions for doing things differently in their programs.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2008 Feb-Mar;25(1):74-518292485
PubMed ID
17895491 View in PubMed
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Inner power, physical strength and existential well-being in daily life: relatives' experiences of receiving soft tissue massage in palliative home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95189
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2009 Aug;18(15):2225-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Cronfalk Berit Seiger
Strang Peter
Ternestedt Britt-Marie
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. berit.cronfalk@ki.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2009 Aug;18(15):2225-33
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Existentialism - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Health status
Home Care Services
Humans
Male
Massage - methods - psychology
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
AIM AND OBJECTIVES: This article explores relatives' experiences of receiving soft tissue massage as a support supplement while caring for a dying family member at home. BACKGROUND: In palliative home care, relatives play an important role as carers to seriously ill and dying family members. To improve their quality of life, different support strategies are of importance. Complementary methods, such as soft tissue massage have become an appreciated supplement for these patients. However, only few studies focus on relatives experiences of receiving soft tissue massage as a supplemental support. DESIGN: Qualitative design METHOD: Nineteen relatives received soft tissue massage (hand or foot) nine times (25 minutes) in their homes. Open-ended semi-structured tape-recorded interviews were conducted once per relative after the nine times of massage, using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: Soft tissue massage gave the relatives' feelings of 'being cared for', 'body vitality' and 'peace of mind'. For a while, they put worries of daily life aside as they just experienced 'being'. During massage, it became apparent that body and mind is constituted of an indestructible completeness. The overarching theme was 'inner power, physical strength and existential well-being in their daily lives'. CONCLUSION: All relatives experienced soft tissue massage positively, although they were under considerable stress. Soft tissue massage could be an option to comfort and support relatives in palliative home care. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: In palliative nursing care, soft tissue massage could present a worthy supplement in supporting caring relatives.
PubMed ID
19583654 View in PubMed
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85 records – page 1 of 9.