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Care dependence: a struggle toward moments of respite.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92798
Source
Clin Nurs Res. 2008 Aug;17(3):220-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Eriksson Monika
Andershed Birgitta
Author Affiliation
Kärnsjukhuset Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
Source
Clin Nurs Res. 2008 Aug;17(3):220-36
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Body Image
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Neoplasms - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Respite Care - psychology
Self Concept
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe people's experiences of being dependent on others for care in their final stage of life, as well as what they felt made their experience of being dependent easier or more difficult. The phenomenological-hermeneutical method was chosen, where data collection consisted of open-ended interviews with nine people undergoing palliative care at a hospice unit or at home. The meaning of being care dependent is described via the following themes: changed relationship with oneself and with others, striving to adapt oneself to the situation, obstacles, and opportunities along the way while dependent. The result is described as an effort, a journey from independence to moments where it was possible to rest and recuperate while struggling with care dependency. Nursing staff require knowledge and understanding of experiences with care dependency to make life easier for people during increasing dependency in the final stage of life.
PubMed ID
18617709 View in PubMed
Less detail

The experience of hope for informal caregivers of palliative patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170663
Source
J Palliat Care. 2005;21(4):285-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Lorraine F Holtslander
Wendy Duggleby
Allison M Williams
Karen E Wright
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2005;21(4):285-91
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Bereavement
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Morale
Negativism
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - psychology
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Social Support
Abstract
This study explored the experience of hope for informal caregivers of palliative patients. Interviews were conducted with 10 caregivers living with and providing care to a palliative patient. The interview data were analyzed using grounded theory qualitative methods. "Eroding hope" was their main concern--a result of bad days, negative messages, and experiences with the health care system. The participants dealt with eroding hope by "hanging on to hope." Hanging on to hope had four subprocesses: a) doing what you have to do, b) living in the moment, c) staying positive, and d) writing your own story. The support of friends, family, and health care professionals, and spiritually connecting with something bigger and stronger were subprocesses. These findings have application for informal caregivers providing palliative care at home, as a basis for assessment and interventions. Health care professionals need to recognize and value the experience of hope for the informal caregivers of palliative patients.
PubMed ID
16483098 View in PubMed
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How to support patients who are crying in palliative home care: an interview study from the nurses' perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286945
Source
Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 09;17(5):479-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
09-2016
Author
Kerstin Rydé
Katarina Hjelm
Source
Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 09;17(5):479-88
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Crying - psychology
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing - methods
Palliative Care - psychology
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Aim The aim of this study was to explore how nurses can support patients who are crying in a palliative home care context.
In palliative care the nurse has a central role in the team whose duty it is to create a sense of security and trust, as well as to give comfort and support the patients. The nurse's responsibility is to identify different needs of the patients for support and develop a relationship with them. Patients may express their pain, anxiety, fear and suffering by crying. No studies have been found which focus on how nurses can support patients who are crying in different ways and crying for different reasons.
A qualitative explorative study was performed. Semi-structured interviews were held with eight nurses aged 32-63 years (Median 40) working in Swedish palliative home care. The data were analysed using Qualitative Content analysis. Findings It was reported that the nurse should meet and confirm the patient during different types of crying episodes and should also be able to alternate between being close and physically touching the in such close contact with the patients, the nurse can provide emotional support by showing empathy, merely being present and letting the patients cry as much as they want. When the crying finally stops, the nurse can support the person by speaking with them, showing sensitivity, humility and respect for the patient's wishes. A few examples of the patients' need for information or practical support emerged. The nurse can emotionally support the person who is crying by just being present, confirming, showing empathy, offering a chance to talk and showing respect for their individual needs and the different ways they may cry.
PubMed ID
26932445 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Oct 29;169(44):3774-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-29-2007
Author
Holger Rasmussen
Lisbeth Langkilde
Author Affiliation
viho@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Oct 29;169(44):3774-7
Date
Oct-29-2007
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counseling
Denmark
Family - psychology
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Terminal Care - methods
Abstract
In the WHO's definition of palliative care, social support plays an important part. When a person is dying, social issues regarding the present and future wellbeing of his/her family will often be of great concern. Social aspects of palliation can be divided into two major areas--social counselling and psycho-social work. The first concerns help to maintain an income and to establish sufficient help to enable the dying person and his/her family to live as well as possible. The second involves help to deal with the new and difficult situation for both the dying person and his/her family.
PubMed ID
18028849 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Jun;54(6):829
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Roger Ladouceur
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Jun;54(6):829
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Palliative Care
Physician-Patient Relations
Social Support
Truth Disclosure
PubMed ID
18556478 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of volunteering in hospice palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161124
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2007 Aug-Sep;24(4):259-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stephen Claxton-Oldfield
Jane Claxton-Oldfield
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, Mount Allison University, 49A York Street, Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada. sclaxton@mta.ca
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2007 Aug-Sep;24(4):259-63
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Career Choice
Empathy
Female
Hospice Care - organization & administration - psychology
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
New Brunswick
Palliative Care - organization & administration - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Concept
Social Support
Volunteers - psychology
Abstract
The goal of this study was to examine the impact of hospice palliative care work on volunteers' lives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 direct-patient care volunteers. More than half of the volunteers became involved in hospice palliative care because of their own experiences with family members and/or friends who have died. Most of the volunteers reported that they were different now or had changed in some way since they have been volunteering (e.g., they had grown in some way, have learned how to keep things in perspective). In addition, most of the volunteers felt that their outlook on life had changed since they started volunteering (e.g., they were more accepting of death, and they learned the importance of living one day at a time). Volunteers reported doing a number of different things to prevent compassion fatigue or burnout (e.g., reading a book, listening to music, talking to others, and taking time off from volunteering). Most of the volunteers said that they would tell anyone who might be thinking of volunteering in hospice palliative care that it is a very rewarding activity and/or that they should try it. Finally, many of the volunteers offered suggestions for doing things differently in their programs.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2008 Feb-Mar;25(1):74-518292485
PubMed ID
17895491 View in PubMed
Less detail

In the frontline of palliative medicine and psychosocial oncology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20933
Source
Acta Oncol. 1999;38(4):403-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
C. Bolund
Source
Acta Oncol. 1999;38(4):403-4
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forecasting
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Norway
Palliative Care - trends
Social Support
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Acta Oncol. 1999;38(4):491-410418717
PubMed ID
10418706 View in PubMed
Less detail

Participants' experiences of a support group intervention for family members during ongoing palliative home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16456
Source
J Palliat Care. 2005;21(4):277-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Anna Milberg
Kristina Rydstrand
Lena Helander
Maria Friedrichsen
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2005;21(4):277-84
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Cost of Illness
Evaluation Studies
Family - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Grief
Group Processes
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe family members' experiences of participation in a support group intervention during ongoing palliative home care. Four taped-recorded focus group interviews were conducted (in total, 13 persons) and a questionnaire was completed by 19 of 22 possible family members. The participants experienced increased perception of support and knowledge, and would recommend that a person in a similar situation join a support group. Categories that emerged in the qualitative content analysis concerned "reasons for support group participation", "group composition contributed to group cohesion", "experience and sensitivity of group leader was a catalyst", "meaningful dialogue helped to solve everyday problems", "sense of cohesion increased effectiveness of the group", and "group sessions and post-session reflection increased perception of inner strength". Support groups for family members seem to be a valuable contribution during ongoing palliative home care. The findings are discussed in relation to recruitment into and ending of support groups.
PubMed ID
16483097 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Follow-up of patients after curative surgery for colorectal cancer]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16654
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Oct 31;167(44):4189-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-31-2005
Author
Peer A Wille-Jørgensen
Mogens Rørbaek Madsen
Author Affiliation
H:S Bispebjerg Hospital, Kirurgisk Afdeling K, og Herning Sygehus, Kirurgisk Forskningsafsnit, København NV. pwj01@bbh.hosp.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Oct 31;167(44):4189-91
Date
Oct-31-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoembryonic Antigen - blood
Colonoscopy
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality - secondary - surgery
Denmark
English Abstract
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - diagnosis
Palliative Care
Practice Guidelines
Social Support
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
Meta-analyses of randomised controlled studies show that intensive follow-up programmes after radical surgery for colorectal cancer have a more positive effect on total survival than do less intensive programmes, but the ideal programme has not yet been found. It appears that monitoring with carcinoembryonal antigen (CEA) and some kind of visualisation of the liver is a way forward, but we do not know how often it should be done. Colonoscopy should be offered every five years to look for metachronous cancer; patients with HNPCC should have a colonoscopy done even more often.
PubMed ID
16266577 View in PubMed
Less detail

85 records – page 1 of 9.