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82 records – page 1 of 9.

The experience of hope for informal caregivers of palliative patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170663
Source
J Palliat Care. 2005;21(4):285-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Lorraine F Holtslander
Wendy Duggleby
Allison M Williams
Karen E Wright
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2005;21(4):285-91
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Bereavement
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Morale
Negativism
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - psychology
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Social Support
Abstract
This study explored the experience of hope for informal caregivers of palliative patients. Interviews were conducted with 10 caregivers living with and providing care to a palliative patient. The interview data were analyzed using grounded theory qualitative methods. "Eroding hope" was their main concern--a result of bad days, negative messages, and experiences with the health care system. The participants dealt with eroding hope by "hanging on to hope." Hanging on to hope had four subprocesses: a) doing what you have to do, b) living in the moment, c) staying positive, and d) writing your own story. The support of friends, family, and health care professionals, and spiritually connecting with something bigger and stronger were subprocesses. These findings have application for informal caregivers providing palliative care at home, as a basis for assessment and interventions. Health care professionals need to recognize and value the experience of hope for the informal caregivers of palliative patients.
PubMed ID
16483098 View in PubMed
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Coping strategies, emotional outcomes and spiritual quality of life in palliative care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161417
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 Jun;13(6):291-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Jean-Francois Desbiens
Lise Fillion
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Laval University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 Jun;13(6):291-300
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Bereavement
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control
Emotions
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff - psychology
Palliative Care
Quality of Life
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Social Support
Spirituality
Abstract
It is in accompanying the dying that palliative care nurses say they find meaning in their work. To further explore this phenomenon, consideration of coping strategies is proposed. The main objective of this correlational study was to describe the association between coping strategies (using a revised version of the COPE scale (Carver et al, 1999)), emotional outcomes (distress and vigour; profile of mood states (POMS)), and spiritual quality of life (using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Spiritual Wellbeing Scale (FACIT-sp)). A sample of 120 nurses providing palliative care in acute care hospitals and the community in Quebec was included. Positive reinterpretation (beta=.27; p
PubMed ID
17851385 View in PubMed
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Coping strategies in the presence of one's own impending death from cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92658
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2009 Jan;37(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Sand Lisa
Olsson Mariann
Strang Peter
Author Affiliation
Unit for Palliative Medicine and Advanced Medical Home Care, ASIH Långbro Park, Stockholm, Sweden. lisa.sand@ki.se
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2009 Jan;37(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Death
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Terminal Care - statistics & numerical data
Terminally Ill - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
An incurable cancer is a threat to life itself. This study focused on how native-born Swedes, who define themselves as nonreligious, actually reflect and act when they try to create helpful strategies in the presence of their own impending deaths and how the strategies serve their purposes. Twenty patients were interviewed in depth. The patients were enrolled in an advanced hospital-based home care team. The interviews were taped, transcribed and analyzed with a qualitative, hermeneutic interpretative method. The informants' efforts to develop useful strategies to restrain death could be symbolized as a cognitive and emotional pendulum, swinging between the extremes of life and death. During the swings of the pendulum, the informants used every means available: their own resources, other people, animals, nature, a transcendent power, hope, imagination and magical thinking. They strove to find factors that fitted their conceptual system and supported their inner balance and structure, all to keep death at a discreet distance and preserve their links to life. These links were togetherness, involvement, hope and continuance, and they served as a shield against hurtful feelings connected to their impending death. The new knowledge about how strategies in the presence of one's own impending death can develop and be used is perhaps the most novel and clinically relevant contribution of this study.
PubMed ID
18676119 View in PubMed
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Care dependence: a struggle toward moments of respite.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92798
Source
Clin Nurs Res. 2008 Aug;17(3):220-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Eriksson Monika
Andershed Birgitta
Author Affiliation
Kärnsjukhuset Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
Source
Clin Nurs Res. 2008 Aug;17(3):220-36
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Body Image
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Neoplasms - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Respite Care - psychology
Self Concept
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe people's experiences of being dependent on others for care in their final stage of life, as well as what they felt made their experience of being dependent easier or more difficult. The phenomenological-hermeneutical method was chosen, where data collection consisted of open-ended interviews with nine people undergoing palliative care at a hospice unit or at home. The meaning of being care dependent is described via the following themes: changed relationship with oneself and with others, striving to adapt oneself to the situation, obstacles, and opportunities along the way while dependent. The result is described as an effort, a journey from independence to moments where it was possible to rest and recuperate while struggling with care dependency. Nursing staff require knowledge and understanding of experiences with care dependency to make life easier for people during increasing dependency in the final stage of life.
PubMed ID
18617709 View in PubMed
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The impact of volunteering in hospice palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161124
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2007 Aug-Sep;24(4):259-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stephen Claxton-Oldfield
Jane Claxton-Oldfield
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, Mount Allison University, 49A York Street, Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada. sclaxton@mta.ca
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2007 Aug-Sep;24(4):259-63
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Career Choice
Empathy
Female
Hospice Care - organization & administration - psychology
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
New Brunswick
Palliative Care - organization & administration - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Concept
Social Support
Volunteers - psychology
Abstract
The goal of this study was to examine the impact of hospice palliative care work on volunteers' lives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 direct-patient care volunteers. More than half of the volunteers became involved in hospice palliative care because of their own experiences with family members and/or friends who have died. Most of the volunteers reported that they were different now or had changed in some way since they have been volunteering (e.g., they had grown in some way, have learned how to keep things in perspective). In addition, most of the volunteers felt that their outlook on life had changed since they started volunteering (e.g., they were more accepting of death, and they learned the importance of living one day at a time). Volunteers reported doing a number of different things to prevent compassion fatigue or burnout (e.g., reading a book, listening to music, talking to others, and taking time off from volunteering). Most of the volunteers said that they would tell anyone who might be thinking of volunteering in hospice palliative care that it is a very rewarding activity and/or that they should try it. Finally, many of the volunteers offered suggestions for doing things differently in their programs.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2008 Feb-Mar;25(1):74-518292485
PubMed ID
17895491 View in PubMed
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The Norwegian version of the Herth Hope Index (HHI-N): a psychometric study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76155
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2004 Sep;2(3):255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Astrid K Wahl
Tone Rustøen
Anners Lerdal
Berit R Hanestad
Oistein Knudsen
Torbjørn Moum
Author Affiliation
Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing Education, Oslo, Norway. astrid.wahl@su.hio.no
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2004 Sep;2(3):255-63
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Emotions
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morale
Neoplasms - psychology
Norway
Palliative Care - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Semantics
Translating
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Herth Hope Index (HHI) in a representative sample of the Norwegian population. METHODS: The HHI-N was administered to 4000 people randomly selected from the Norwegian population. 1893 questionnaires were usable, yielding a response rate of 48.5%. RESULTS: The internal consistency of the HHI-N, estimated by Cronbach's alpha, was 0.81. Factor analysis resulted in a two-factor solution, which explained 38% of the variance. The correlation between hope and overall quality of life was 0.48 (p
Notes
Comment In: Palliat Support Care. 2004 Sep;2(3):229-3016594407
PubMed ID
16594410 View in PubMed
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Meanings of being old, living on one's own and suffering from incurable cancer in rural Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114339
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2013 Dec;17(6):781-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Siri Andreassen Devik
Ingela Enmarker
Guri Bitnes Wiik
Ove Hellzèn
Author Affiliation
Centre for Care Research Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Norway; Department of Health Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden. Electronic address: siri.a.devik@hint.no.
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2013 Dec;17(6):781-7
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Narration
Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Norway
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Quality of Life
Risk assessment
Rural Health Services - standards - trends
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Isolation
Socioeconomic Factors
Terminally ill
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore and understand the lived experience of older people living alone and suffering from incurable cancer in rural Norway.
Narrative interviews were conducted with five older people with incurable cancer (three women and two men, aged 71-79), receiving outpatient and life-prolonging chemotherapy and living alone in their homes in rural areas. A phenomenological hermeneutical approach was used to interpret the meaning of the lived experience.
Four main themes were found: enduring by keeping hope alive, becoming aware that you are on your own, living up to expectations of being a good patient and being at risk of losing one's identity and value. Enduring this situation means struggling with terminal illness and facing death in a brave manner, and replacing former ways of living. The process of providing treatment may threaten dignity and cause additional distress.
These results show a complex and comprehensive situation where physical symptoms and emotions are interwoven. Further the results describe how the ways of suffering caused by the manner in which care is delivered, suffering related to the cancer disease and existential suffering, may increase each other's impact. The social and rural context calls for special attention as the patients may lack recourses to gain sufficient care. Their comfort depends to a large extent on the health professionals' sensitivity.
PubMed ID
23623233 View in PubMed
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Older people with incurable cancer: Existential meaning-making from a life-span perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276675
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2016 Feb;14(1):20-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Sigrid Helene Kjørven Haug
Lars J Danbolt
Kari Kvigne
Valerie DeMarinis
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2016 Feb;14(1):20-32
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Existentialism - psychology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Norway
Palliative Care - psychology
Perception
Abstract
An increasing number of older people in Western countries are living with incurable cancer, receiving palliative care from specialized healthcare contexts. The aim of our article was to understand how they experience the existential meaning-making function in daily living from a life-span perspective.
Some 21 participants (12 men and 9 women), aged 70-88, were interviewed in a semistructured framework. They were recruited from somatic hospitals in southeastern Norway. We applied the model of selective optimization with compensation (SOC) from life-span developmental psychology in a deductive manner to explore the participants' life-oriented adaptive strategies. A meaning component was added to the SOC model.
The participants experienced the existential meaning-making function on two levels. On a superordinate level, it was an important component for interpreting and coordinating the adaptive strategies of SOC for reaching the most important goals in daily living. The existential meaning-making framework provided for a comprehensive understanding of resilience, allowing for both restoration and growth components to be identified. The second level was related to strategy, in that the existential meaning-making function was involved in a complex interaction with behavioral resources and resilience, leading to continuation of goals and more realistic goal adjustments. A few experienced existential meaning-making dysfunction.
The modified SOC model was seen as applicable for palliative care in specialized healthcare contexts. Employing the existential meaning-making framework with its complementary understanding of resilience as growth potential to the SOC model's restoration potential can help older people to identify how they make meaning and how this influences their adaptation process to being incurably sick.
PubMed ID
26062404 View in PubMed
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Inner power, physical strength and existential well-being in daily life: relatives' experiences of receiving soft tissue massage in palliative home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95189
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2009 Aug;18(15):2225-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Cronfalk Berit Seiger
Strang Peter
Ternestedt Britt-Marie
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. berit.cronfalk@ki.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2009 Aug;18(15):2225-33
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Existentialism - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Health status
Home Care Services
Humans
Male
Massage - methods - psychology
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
AIM AND OBJECTIVES: This article explores relatives' experiences of receiving soft tissue massage as a support supplement while caring for a dying family member at home. BACKGROUND: In palliative home care, relatives play an important role as carers to seriously ill and dying family members. To improve their quality of life, different support strategies are of importance. Complementary methods, such as soft tissue massage have become an appreciated supplement for these patients. However, only few studies focus on relatives experiences of receiving soft tissue massage as a supplemental support. DESIGN: Qualitative design METHOD: Nineteen relatives received soft tissue massage (hand or foot) nine times (25 minutes) in their homes. Open-ended semi-structured tape-recorded interviews were conducted once per relative after the nine times of massage, using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: Soft tissue massage gave the relatives' feelings of 'being cared for', 'body vitality' and 'peace of mind'. For a while, they put worries of daily life aside as they just experienced 'being'. During massage, it became apparent that body and mind is constituted of an indestructible completeness. The overarching theme was 'inner power, physical strength and existential well-being in their daily lives'. CONCLUSION: All relatives experienced soft tissue massage positively, although they were under considerable stress. Soft tissue massage could be an option to comfort and support relatives in palliative home care. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: In palliative nursing care, soft tissue massage could present a worthy supplement in supporting caring relatives.
PubMed ID
19583654 View in PubMed
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Existential issues in palliative care--interviews with cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20358
Source
J Palliat Care. 2000;16(2):20-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
I. Bolmsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Ethics, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2000;16(2):20-4
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Freedom
Guilt
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
A minority of terminally ill patients achieve a peaceful death. Many factors, including existential distress, contribute to the emotional disquiet of patients. This study focuses on the reactions of terminally ill cancer patients to questions concerning existential issues within the themes of meaning, relations, autonomy, guilt, dignity, and communication. The results of this study indicate that patients experience a number of problems dealing with existential issues, consider these questions important, and wish to be able to discuss these types of questions with someone.
PubMed ID
10887728 View in PubMed
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82 records – page 1 of 9.