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39 records – page 1 of 4.

Source
Can Fam Physician. 2001 Oct;47:2065-6, 2072-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001

[Palliative care: profile of medical practice in the Quebec city region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192404
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2001 Oct;47:1999-2005
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
M. Aubin
L. Vézina
P. Allard
R. Bergeron
A P Lemieux
Author Affiliation
Unité de médecine familiale de l'Hôpital Laval au Québec, QC.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2001 Oct;47:1999-2005
Date
Oct-2001
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Family Practice - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
House Calls
Humans
Institutionalization
Male
Office Visits
Palliative Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Workload
Abstract
To describe the palliative care provided by physicians in the Quebec city region and to identify factors that affect its delivery.
Mailed survey.
Quebec city region.
General practitioners in active clinical practice.
Physicians' personal and professional characteristics and their palliative care practice (volume of work, source of requests for follow-up care, place of delivery of care, resources used, difficulties, encountered).
Of the 476 physicians (67%) who responded to our survey, 295 (62%) provided palliative care. Of these, 70% saw no more than two patients requiring palliative care per month, and 55% devoted no more than 2 hours per week to this aspect of patient care. Most (76%) provided palliative care in a variety of settings (private office, home, institution). Home care teams working out of local community health centres are the resource physicians drew upon most frequently (69%). The main difficulties encountered were a lack of clinical expertise, scheduling home care, and providing patients and families with emotional support.
Most physicians in the Quebec city region provided palliative care occasionally. This care could be improved by removing various logistical and professional barriers.
Notes
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Apr 19;292(6527):1051-32421820
Cites: J R Coll Gen Pract. 1988 Sep;38(314):411-33256657
Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 1990 Dec;19(12):1835-412275665
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1992 Spring;8(1):28-321583564
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1993 Jan;39:49-578382093
Cites: J Public Health Med. 1993 Mar;15(1):3-87682424
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1993 Summer;9(2):33-87690852
Cites: Palliat Med. 1993;7(2):117-267505171
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jan;40:47-507508776
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Feb;40:240-67510562
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1998 May;44:1028-349612588
Cites: Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 1996 Dec;5(4):242-59117069
Cites: Clin Geriatr Med. 1996 May;12(2):267-788799347
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1996 May;42:899-904; 907-108688693
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 1994 Oct;44(387):461-47538315
Cites: Can J Oncol. 1994 Jul;4(3):285-907529630
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Aug 24;161(4):369-7310478159
PubMed ID
11723594 View in PubMed
Less detail

Role of family physicians in end-of-life care. Rhetoric, role, and reality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192408
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2001 Oct;47:1941-3, 1949-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001

Should physicians be open to euthanasia?: NO.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144199
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Apr;56(4):321-3, 325-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Hubert Marcoux
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Suite 4486, Pavillon Vandry, 1050, Avenue de la médecine, Quebec, QC G1K 7P4. hubert.marcoux@mfa.ulaval.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Apr;56(4):321-3, 325-7
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary - ethics
Humans
Palliative Care
Personal Autonomy
Questionnaires
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Aug 2;362(9381):345-5012907005
Cites: N Z Med J. 2004 Jun 18;117(1196):U93415280938
Cites: Med J Aust. 1997 Feb 17;166(4):191-69066548
Cites: Palliat Med. 2006 Jan;20(1):3-1016482752
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Sep;45(6):887-929255921
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Apr 23;338(17):1193-2019554861
Cites: BMJ. 2005 May 7;330(7499):104115879373
Cites: Medicina (B Aires). 1996;56(4):369-779138341
PubMed ID
20393084 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Health promotion of the elderly: a conceptual matter].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178476
Source
Sante Publique. 2004 Jun;16(2):303-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
S. Lafrenière
Author Affiliation
CHSLD de la MRC Champlain, 831 Notre-Dame, St-Lambert, Québec, Canada J4R 151. isadomi@sympatico.ca
Source
Sante Publique. 2004 Jun;16(2):303-12
Date
Jun-2004
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Community Health Nursing
Geriatric Nursing
Health promotion
Humans
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Palliative Care
Quebec
Abstract
Although community health nurses have to face the increasing needs in curative and palliative care, they still engage in health promotion activities for the elderly, mainly cognitive and behavioural ones. The Quebec community health nurses who choose the McGill model of nursing, are able to integrate health promotion interventions in their daily practice with old aged people. In fact, this model helps these nurses consider the elderly, health, sickness and nursing care in a way that makes them promote self-esteem, empowerment, development and coping through most of their interventions. Moreover, the elderly population would benefit from an increased implication of nurses in ecological, environmental and community health promotion projects.
PubMed ID
15360183 View in PubMed
Less detail

Palliative nurses' interest group--June 2005 report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172196
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2005;15(3):191-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Diane Williams
Author Affiliation
Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON. diane.williams@rmp.uhn.on.ca
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2005;15(3):191-3
Date
2005
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Oncology Nursing
Palliative Care
Public Opinion
PubMed ID
16261815 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2005;15(2):122-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Diane Williams
Author Affiliation
Palliative Radiation Oncology Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 2B-633, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, ON. diane.williams@rmp.uhn.on.ca
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2005;15(2):122-3
Date
2005
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Fellowships and Scholarships - organization & administration
Humans
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Specialties, Nursing - education - organization & administration
PubMed ID
15969334 View in PubMed
Less detail

Palliative care. First and foremost the domain of family physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169585
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Apr;52:417-8, 424-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
François Lehmann
Serge Daneault
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Apr;52:417-8, 424-5
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family Practice - education
Humans
Palliative Care
Quality of Health Care
Notes
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Apr 19;292(6527):1051-32421820
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Jan 23;306(6872):249-518443527
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 1997 Aug;14(2):74-819262036
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 1997 Nov;14(5):265-739392919
Cites: J Palliat Care. 2004 Spring;20(1):7-1115132070
Cites: Psychooncology. 2004 Oct;13(10):700-815386643
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1998 May;44:1028-349612588
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2001 Oct;47:1941-3, 1949-5111723582
Cites: Palliat Med. 2002 Nov;16(6):457-6412465692
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2006 Jul;52:84816893143
PubMed ID
16639960 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Loan of services developing palliative care skills based on the apprentice model].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152204
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2008 Sep-Oct;5(7):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Clémence Dallaire
Geneviève Audet
Michel L'Heureux
Louise Saint-Laurent
Lise Fillion
Diane Morin
Nathalie Dubé
Author Affiliation
Faculté des sciences infirmières de l'Université Laval.
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2008 Sep-Oct;5(7):13-9
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allied Health Personnel - education
Education, Nursing
Humans
Inservice training
Nursing Care - standards
Palliative Care - standards
Quebec
Abstract
For over 25 years, the Maison Michel-Sarrazin, a private palliative care institution in the Quebec City region, has had an original agreement with other establishments in the healthcare network (hospitals, long-term residential centres and CLSCs), in the form of the loan of nursing services. Based on the findings of a study as part of a research program, this article describes the loan of nursing services and qualitatively assesses its effects on the development of nurses' palliative care skills. An evaluative descriptive approach based on two conceptual frameworks (Giddens; Patton) was used to compile the views of 79 players. The findings demonstrate the innovative nature of the loan of nursing services and its considerable influence on the development of nursing skills, thanks to training based on the apprenticeship model (learning through observation and imitation), and on nursing practice at the Maison Michel-Sarrazin. Nevertheless, the controversy surrounding training using the apprenticeship model and the lack of recognition of this training on the part of the lending institutions raise questions despite the general satisfaction with the loan of nursing services.
PubMed ID
19266788 View in PubMed
Less detail

39 records – page 1 of 4.