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An integrative framework for conducting palliative care research with First Nations communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144141
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):47-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Holly Prince
Mary Lou Kelley
Author Affiliation
Centre for Education and Research on Aging and Health, and School of Social Work, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada P7B 5E1. hprince@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):47-53
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research
Community-Institutional Relations
Cultural Competency
Ethics, Research
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Ontario
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Program Development
Notes
Erratum In: J Palliat Care. 2011 Autumn;27(3):preceding 187
PubMed ID
20402186 View in PubMed
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A rainbow named Samantha (Gentle Waters).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144143
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):32-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Darlene Grantham
Author Affiliation
Palliative Care Program, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Canada. dgrantham@hsc.mb.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):32-3
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Bone Marrow Transplantation - adverse effects
Child
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Leukemia - nursing - therapy
Manitoba
Nurse-Patient Relations
Palliative Care
PubMed ID
20402182 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010

Should physicians be open to euthanasia?: NO.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144199
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Apr;56(4):321-3, 325-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Hubert Marcoux
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Suite 4486, Pavillon Vandry, 1050, Avenue de la médecine, Quebec, QC G1K 7P4. hubert.marcoux@mfa.ulaval.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Apr;56(4):321-3, 325-7
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary - ethics
Humans
Palliative Care
Personal Autonomy
Questionnaires
Notes
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PubMed ID
20393084 View in PubMed
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The coordination of primary and oncology specialty care at the end of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144265
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 2010;2010(40):31-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Paul K J Han
Daniel Rayson
Author Affiliation
MA, Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Maine Medical Center, 39 Forest Ave., Portland, ME 04101, USA. hanp@mmc.org
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 2010;2010(40):31-7
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Delivery of Health Care
Forecasting
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Medical Oncology
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Palliative Care
Patient Care Management - organization & administration
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Quality of Health Care
Terminal Care - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
The end of life is a time in which both the intensity of cancer patients' needs and the complexity of care increase, heightening the need for effective care coordination between oncology and primary care physicians. However, little is known about the extent to which such coordination occurs or the ways in which it is achieved. We review existing evidence on current practice patterns, patient and physician preferences regarding involvement of oncology and primary care physicians in end-of-life care, and the potential impact of care coordination on the quality of care and health outcomes. Data are lacking on the extent to which end-of-life care is coordinated between oncology and primary care physicians. Patients appear to prefer the continued involvement of both types of physicians, and preliminary evidence suggests that coordinated care improves health outcomes. However, more work needs to be done to corroborate these findings, and many unanswered questions remain.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20386052 View in PubMed
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Learning that leads to action: impact and characteristics of a professional education approach to improve the care of critically ill children and their families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144430
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Apr;164(4):315-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Mildred Z Solomon
David M Browning
Deborah L Dokken
Melanie P Merriman
Cynda H Rushton
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. msolomon@edc.org
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Apr;164(4):315-22
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Curriculum
Education, Continuing - methods
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Models, Educational
Palliative Care
Patient Advocacy
Pediatrics - education
Professional-Family Relations
Program Evaluation
Quality of Health Care
United States
Abstract
To determine the impact of an innovative professional educational approach on clinicians' confidence and ability to make institutional improvements in pediatric palliative care.
Evaluation to assess impact of educational intervention on participants and participant institutions.
Retreats lasting 2.5 days.
Physicians, nurses, psychosocial staff, and bereaved parents.
"Relational learning across boundaries" pedagogy.
Analysis of participant questionnaires (n = 782, response rate of 84%), team leader surveys (n = 72, response rate of 71%), and follow-up interview with subsample (n = 21, response rate of 81%). Outcomes included confidence to act and institutional improvements achieved.
Seventy-four percent of team leaders reported significant or moderate improvement in pediatric palliative care after the retreat; only 1% reported no improvement. Ninety-one percent credited the retreat experience as being somewhat or very instrumental to the improvements, which included the establishment of pediatric palliative care and bereavement programs, improvements in interdisciplinary communication, care coordination, clinician-family interaction at the bedside, and educational programs. Participants attributed the impact of the 2.5-day retreat to its key pedagogical features, involvement of family members as equal participants and participation of colleagues from other disciplines and care settings, as well as the ground rules used for the small group seminars.
The intervention was successful in improving clinicians' confidence and catalyzed improvements in pediatric palliative care within participating institutions. Relational learning holds promise for professional learning, especially when the educational goal is tied to enabling a shift in social and ethical norms.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Apr;164(4):389-9020368494
PubMed ID
20368484 View in PubMed
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Time to move on from the euthanasia debate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144593
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Jun 15;182(9):877
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2010
Author
Ken Flegel
Paul C Hébert
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Jun 15;182(9):877
Date
Jun-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Euthanasia
Euthanasia, Passive
Humans
Palliative Care
Terminal Care
Notes
Cites: Palliat Med. 2003 Mar;17(2):97-101; discussion 102-7912701848
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2007 Mar;33(3):549-5017180392
Comment In: CMAJ. 2010 Sep 7;182(12):133020823184
Comment In: CMAJ. 2010 Sep 7;182(12):133020823183
PubMed ID
20351117 View in PubMed
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Cost variations in ambulatory and home-based palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144619
Source
Palliat Med. 2010 Jul;24(5):523-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Denise N Guerriere
Brandon Zagorski
Konrad Fassbender
Lisa Masucci
Lawrence Librach
Peter C Coyte
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. denise.guerriere@utoronto.ca
Source
Palliat Med. 2010 Jul;24(5):523-32
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - economics
Canada
Caregivers - economics
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards
Female
Home Care Services - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - economics
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care - economics - standards
Socioeconomic Factors
Terminally ill
Abstract
Restructuring health care in Canada has emphasized the provision of ambulatory and home-based palliative care. Acquiring economic evidence is critical given this trend and its tremendous demands on family caregivers. The purposes of this study were: 1) to comprehensively assess the societal costs of home-based palliative care; and 2) to examine the socio-demographic and clinical factors that account for variations in costs over the course of the palliative trajectory. One hundred and thirty-six family caregivers were interviewed every two weeks from time of palliative referral until death. Information regarding appointments, travel and out-of-pocket expenses, time devoted to caregiving, as well as demographic and clinical characteristics were measured. The mean monthly cost of care per patient was $24,549 (2008 CDN$). Family caregivers' time costs comprised most costs (70%). Multivariable linear regression indicated that costs were greater for patients who: had lower physical functioning (p
PubMed ID
20348270 View in PubMed
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On the road again: patient perspectives on commuting for palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144741
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2010 Jun;8(2):187-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Barbara Pesut
Carole A Robinson
Joan L Bottorff
Gillian Fyles
Sandra Broughton
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna British Columbia, Canada. barb.pesut@ubc.ca
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2010 Jun;8(2):187-95
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Cancer Care Facilities
Cost of Illness
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Palliative Care - organization & administration - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Terminally Ill - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Transportation - economics - methods
Abstract
The aim of this research project was to gain an understanding of the experiences of rural cancer patients who commute to an urban cancer center for palliative care.
The study utilized a mixed method design. Fifteen individuals with a palliative designation participated in semi-structured interviews and filled out the Problems and Needs in Palliative Care Questionnaire.
Qualitative findings included three major themes: cultures of rural life and care, strategies for commuting, and the effects of commuting. Participants valued their rural lifestyles and gained significant support from their communities. Strategies included preparing for the trip with particular attention to pain management, making the most of time, and maintaining significant relationships. Establishing a routine helped to offset the anxiety of commuting. Commuting was costly but the quality of life and supportive relationships obtained through treatment were significant benefits. Questionnaire data suggested that participants were experiencing a number of problems but few indicated they desired more professional attention to those problems.
Rural lifestyles are often an important part of overall well-being and commuting for care is both costly and complex. Health care providers should assist individuals to weigh the relative contributions of staying in their rural locale versus commuting for care to their overall quality of life. Palliative-care individuals in this study indicated a number of ongoing problems but were not inclined to seek further assistance from health care providers in addressing those problems. Clinicians should actively inquire about problems and further research is needed to understand why patients are reluctant to seek help.
PubMed ID
20307369 View in PubMed
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1516 records – page 1 of 152.