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1514 records – page 1 of 152.

The Senate report on end-of-life care: the ball is in our court.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195199
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Mar 20;164(6):794-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2001
Author
H M Chochinov
Author Affiliation
chochin@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Mar 20;164(6):794-5
Date
Mar-20-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Forecasting
Humans
Palliative Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Politics
Quality Assurance, Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1992 Spring;8(1):54-81374795
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Oct 15;151(8):1133-67522945
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Jan 13;281(2):163-89917120
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1997 Winter;13(4):5-139447806
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1995 Dec;40(10):593-6028681256
PubMed ID
11276546 View in PubMed
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A century of progress in palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195855
Source
Lancet. 2000 Dec;356 Suppl:s24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
R L Fainsinger
Author Affiliation
Palliative Care Program, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. rfainsin@cha.ab.ca
Source
Lancet. 2000 Dec;356 Suppl:s24
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Palliative Care - organization & administration - trends
PubMed ID
11191480 View in PubMed
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Reaching death with comfort and a clear mind.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195943
Source
US News World Rep. 2000 Oct 30;129(17):60, 62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2000

Palliative cancer care in two health centres and one hospice in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196154
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2001 Jan;9(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
U K Lammi
E. Kosunen
P. Kellokumpu-Lehtinen
Author Affiliation
Tapulintie 16 as 1, 36200 Kangasala, Finland. uk.lammi@fimnet.fi
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2001 Jan;9(1):25-31
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Community Health Centers
Demography
Female
Finland
Health Care Surveys
Hospices
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Patient Care Planning
Quality of Health Care
Quality of Life
Abstract
This study evaluates palliative treatment of inpatient cancer patients in two health centres and in one hospice in Finland. Apart from outpatient clinics, health centres in Finland also have inpatient wards where patients are treated by GPs. The hospice provides a home-like environment for terminal patients, who are cared for by a specialist in internal medicine. Our patient population comprised 36 health centre patients and 36 hospice patients enrolled in 1998. A structured questionnaire was used containing information on diagnosis, duration of the illness, current medication, daily activities, and socioeconomic background. The nurses assessed their patients' emotional needs. We found that the two groups of patients were similar in terms of gender, marital status and social situation. The hospice patients were significantly younger (P
PubMed ID
11147139 View in PubMed
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Multidisciplinary radiation oncology palliative care rounds as a continuing educational activity implementing the rapid response radiotherapy program at the toronto sunnybrook regional cancer centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184259
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2003;18(2):86-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Ewa Szumacher
Edmee Franssen
Charles Hayter
Cyril Danjoux
Edward Chow
Lourdes Andersson
Rebecca Wong
Andrew Loblaw
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ewa.szumacher@tsrcc.on.ca
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2003;18(2):86-90
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cancer Care Facilities
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Humans
Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Ontario
Palliative Care
Patient care team
Physicians
Program Evaluation
Radiation Oncology - education - methods
Abstract
This paper describes the development of the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program and evaluates the continuing medical education (CME) series, in the form of multidisciplinary monthly Radiation Oncology Palliative Care Rounds at the Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre.
Palliative care rounds were initiated by the multidisciplinary committee in September, 1998. From January, 2000, to June, 2002, attendees used a standard 5- point Likert rating scale to conduct formal evaluations.
A total of 203 evaluation forms examining 20 rounds have been collected. Findings indicated that 86.8, 96.0, 87.1, and 90.8% of participants thought the material of the presentation was relevant to their practice, interesting, and instructional. Overall 90.1% of the respondents highly rated the grand rounds (rating of 4 or 5).
The grand rounds are an effective CME activity at our hospital.
PubMed ID
12888382 View in PubMed
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Family physician continuity of care and emergency department use in end-of-life cancer care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184286
Source
Med Care. 2003 Aug;41(8):992-1001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Frederick Burge
Beverley Lawson
Grace Johnston
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Fred.Burge@Dal.Ca
Source
Med Care. 2003 Aug;41(8):992-1001
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Continuity of Patient Care - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - therapy
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - utilization
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Despite cancer patients preferring to spend their last days out-of-hospital, many make difficult visits to the emergency department (ED). Family physician continuity of care has been shown in some clinical situations to reduce ED utilization.
To determine if greater family physician continuity of care for cancer patients during the end-of-life is associated with less ED utilization.
This retrospective, population-based study involved secondary analysis of linked administrative data files for 1992 to 1997. Sources included the Nova Scotia Cancer Registry, Vital Statistics, the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center Oncology Patient Information System and Palliative Care Program (PCP), Hospital Admissions/Separation data, and Physician Services information. Subjects included adults with a recorded date of cancer diagnosis who died of cancer and who had made at least three visits to a family physician during their last 6 months of life. The relationship between total ED visits and family physician continuity of care, developed using the Modified Modified Continuity Index (MMCI), was examined using negative binomial regression with adjustments for survival, year of death, sex, age, cancer type, region, PCP admission, specialty visits, hospital days, death location, income quintile, and total ambulatory visits.
In total, 8702 subjects made 11,551 ED visits (median = 1.0); median MMCI was 0.83. Adjusted results indicate those experiencing low continuity (MMCI or = 0.8) and patients experiencing moderate continuity (MMCI = 0.5-0.8) made twice as many ED visits (RR = 2.28; CI = 2.15-2.42).
Given this significant association between family physician continuity of care and ED visits during the end-of-life, and given international trends to reform primary care, active planning of strategies to facilitate such continuity should be encouraged.
PubMed ID
12886178 View in PubMed
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A bedside food cart as an alternate food service for acute and palliative oncological patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184297
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2003 Sep;11(9):611-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Patti Pietersma
Sandra Follett-Bick
Brenda Wilkinson
Nancy Guebert
Kim Fisher
Jose Pereira
Author Affiliation
Palliative Care Office, Foothills Medical Centre, Room 712, South Tower, 30-31 Hospital Drive, Calgary, AB, T2 N 2T9, Canada.
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2003 Sep;11(9):611-4
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Humans
Menu Planning - methods
Neoplasms - nursing
Palliative Care
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Patients with advanced cancer experience various problems with eating, and their meals should be tailored to meet their specific needs. Two methods of food service were compared in a shared acute oncology/palliative care unit; an electrical food cart allowing patients to select their food types and portions at the bedside, and a traditional food tray delivery service that relied on meals being prepared in a centralized kitchen and then delivered by tray. Over a 10-day period, lunch meals were delivered by food cart and supper meals via food trays. Twenty-seven out of 32 patients participated in the trial. Patients significantly preferred the food cart to the trays with respect to the timing and appeal of the meal, appropriateness of food types and food portions and the variety of the food choices. A food cart as used in this trial provides a more flexible and appropriate method of food delivery to in-patients in the oncology and palliative unit. Further studies should examine whether this translates to improved caloric intake and quality of life parameters.
PubMed ID
12883966 View in PubMed
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Canadian Thoracic Society recommendations for management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184491
Source
Can Respir J. 2003 May-Jun;10 Suppl A:11A-65A
Publication Type
Article
Author
Denis E O'Donnell
Shawn Aaron
Jean Bourbeau
Paul Hernandez
Darcy Marciniuk
Meyer Balter
Gordon Ford
Andre Gervais
Roger Goldstein
Rick Hodder
Francois Maltais
Jeremy Road
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen's University, 102 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario K7L 2V6, Canada. odonnell@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2003 May-Jun;10 Suppl A:11A-65A
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Lung Transplantation
Palliative Care
Patient Education as Topic
Pneumonectomy
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Respiration, Artificial
Respiratory System Agents - therapeutic use
alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common cause of disability and death in Canada. Moreover, morbidity and mortality from COPD continue to rise, and the economic burden is enormous. The main goal of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) Evidence-Based Guidelines is to optimize early diagnosis, prevention and management of COPD in Canada. Targeted spirometry is strongly recommended to expedite early diagnosis in smokers and exsmokers who develop respiratory symptoms, and who are at risk for COPD. Smoking cessation remains the single most effective intervention in accordance with the increasing severity of symptoms and disability. Long-acting anticholinergics and beta2-agonist inhalers should be prescribed for patients who remain symptomatic despite short-acting bronchodilatory therapy. Inhaled steroids should not be used as first-line therapy in COPD but have a role in preventing exacerbations in patients with more advanced disease who suffer recurrent exacerbations. Management strategies consisting of combined modern pharmacotherapy and nonpharmacotherapeutic interventions (eg, pulmonary rehabilitation/exercise training) can effectively improve symptoms, activity levels and quality of life, even in patients with severe COPD. Acute exacerbations of COPD cause significant morbidity and mortality and should be treated promptly with bronchodilators and a short course of oral steroids; antibiotics should be prescribed for purulent exacerbations. Patients with advanced COPD and respiratory failure require a comprehensive management plan that incorporates structured end-of-life care.
Notes
Comment In: Can Respir J. 2004 Jan-Feb;11(1):15-615010727
PubMed ID
12861361 View in PubMed
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Palliative radiotherapy for patients with bone metastases: survey of primary care physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184883
Source
Radiother Oncol. 2003 May;67(2):221-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Elizabeth A Barnes
Matthew Parliament
John Hanson
Sharon Watanabe
J Lynn Palmer
Eduardo Bruera
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Radiother Oncol. 2003 May;67(2):221-3
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Neoplasms - radiotherapy - secondary
Canada
Clinical Competence
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Multivariate Analysis
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Three hundred Canadian primary care physicians were surveyed to determine their perceived barriers to the accessibility of palliative bone radiotherapy and their perceptions regarding treatment efficacy. The response rate was 61%. Factors perceived to hinder accessibility were identified, and the physicians recognized they were not comfortable with their radiotherapy knowledge.
PubMed ID
12812854 View in PubMed
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1514 records – page 1 of 152.