Skip header and navigation

Refine By

98 records – page 1 of 10.

A Canadian experience of integrating complementary therapy in a hospital palliative care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107364
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Oct;16(10):1294-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Liora Berger
Marianne Tavares
Brian Berger
Author Affiliation
1 University of Queensland School of Medicine , Brisbane, Australia .
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Oct;16(10):1294-8
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Complementary Therapies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Palliative Care
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The provision of complementary therapy in palliative care is rare in Canadian hospitals. An Ontario hospital's palliative care unit developed a complementary therapy pilot project within the interdisciplinary team to explore potential benefits. Massage, aromatherapy, Reiki, and Therapeutic Touchâ„¢ were provided in an integrated approach. This paper reports on the pilot project, the results of which may encourage its replication in other palliative care programs.
The intentions were (1) to increase patients'/families' experience of quality and satisfaction with end-of-life care and (2) to determine whether the therapies could enhance symptom management.
Data analysis (n=31) showed a significant decrease in severity of pain, anxiety, low mood, restlessness, and discomfort (p
PubMed ID
24020920 View in PubMed
Less detail

Treatment with curative intent and survival in men with high-risk prostate cancer. A population-based study of 11?380 men with serum PSA level 20-100?ng/mL.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122914
Source
BJU Int. 2013 Mar;111(3):381-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Sam Ladjevardi
Anders Berglund
Eberhard Varenhorst
Ola Bratt
Anders Widmark
Gabriel Sandblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Sam.ladjevardi@surgsci.uu.se
Source
BJU Int. 2013 Mar;111(3):381-8
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - utilization
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: There are two randomized controlled trials showing that radiotherapy can be beneficial for men with locally advanced prostate cancer. The present study confirms the importance of curative treatment for men with high-risk prostate cancer.
To investigate the influence of curative treatment on cause-specific mortality in men diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels between 20 and 100?ng/mL.
Patients with PCa (T1-4, N0/N1/NX, M0/MX), PSA 20-100?ng/mL and age =75 years were identified in the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden. Data on co-morbidity diagnoses were obtained from the National Patient Register and cause of death from the Cause of Death Register. Following adjustment for age at diagnosis, co-morbidity burden, Gleason score, T-category, PSA level and cause-specific mortality in relation to treatment were estimated using Cox regression analysis.
A total of 11?380 men were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2008 and fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The cumulative 10-year PCa-specific mortality was 36% for patients receiving only palliative treatment and 13% for those treated with curative intent. For the 8462 (74%) patients with PSA levels from 20 to 50?ng/mL at diagnosis, the hazard ratio for death from PCa was 0.23 (95% confidence interval 0.19-0.27) for those treated with curative intent compared with those given palliative treatment after adjusting for age, co-morbidity, T category, PSA level and Gleason score. The corresponding hazard ratio was 0.22 (95% confidence interval 0.17-0.30) for patients with PSA levels from 51 to 100?ng/mL.
Treatment with curative intent for men with high-risk PCa was associated with reduced cause-specific mortality and should be considered even when serum PSA exceeds 20?ng/mL.
PubMed ID
22758210 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patterns of care in advanced HIV disease in a tertiary treatment centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216618
Source
AIDS Care. 1995;7 Suppl 1:S47-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
I. Goldstone
D. Kuhl
A. Johnson
R. Le
A. McLeod
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
AIDS Care. 1995;7 Suppl 1:S47-56
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - therapy
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Patient Readmission
Resuscitation
Retrospective Studies
Social Support
Terminal Care
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A retrospective chart review of all in-patient deaths in 1992 was undertaken to examine patterns of care in advanced HIV disease at St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada. St Paul's Hospital cares for approximately 75% of the Province of British Columbia's AIDS caseload. This represents about 18% of Canada's caseload. Data were collected on demographic characteristics, the utilization of home care and community services, income and social support, symptom presentation at terminal admission and the utilization of acute hospital care and hospital based palliative care. A total of 126 deaths were reviewed. All but two subjects were homosexual/bisexual men. The median age at death was 39 years (range 24-67). Four patterns of care at death were identified: (1) aggressive therapy with resuscitation 24 (19%), (resuscitation was initiated in 58%); (2) aggressive therapy with a no resuscitation order 49 (39%), in which the palliative period was a median of three days; (3) death on the palliative care unit 33 (29%), with a median survival once palliative of 20 days; and (4) death on the palliative care unit following respite admissions 16 (13%), with a median survival once palliative of 64 days. Despite a well known and respected Palliative Care Unit and community palliative care programme, there is a marked trend towards death occurring during aggressive therapy with a 200% increase in the initiation of resuscitation compared to the previous three years. No-one has been discharged alive from hospital following the initiation of resuscitation since 1988. This study illustrates the need for providers and persons infected with HIV to reconsider expectations about treatment outcomes in advanced HIV disease.
PubMed ID
7543290 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristics of the Family Caregivers Who Did Not Benefit From a Successful Psychoeducational Group Intervention During Palliative Cancer Care: A Prospective Correlational Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284811
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2017 Jan/Feb;40(1):76-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maja Holm
Kristofer Årestedt
Ida Carlander
Yvonne Wengström
Joakim Öhlen
Anette Alvariza
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2017 Jan/Feb;40(1):76-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Caregivers - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Palliative Care
Prospective Studies
Psychotherapy, Group
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Although there has been a steady increase in intervention studies aimed toward supporting family caregivers in palliative cancer care, they often report modest effect sizes and there is a lack of knowledge about possible barriers to intervention effectiveness.
The aim of this study is to explore the characteristics of family caregivers who did not benefit from a successful psychoeducational group intervention compared with the characteristics of those who did.
A psychoeducational intervention for family caregivers was delivered at 10 palliative settings in Sweden. Questionnaires were used to collect data at baseline and following the intervention. The Preparedness for Caregiving Scale was the main outcome for the study and was used to decide whether or not the family caregiver had benefited from the intervention (Preparedness for Caregiving Scale difference score = 0 vs = 1).
A total of 82 family caregivers completed the intervention and follow-up. Caregivers who did not benefit from the intervention had significantly higher ratings of their preparedness and competence for caregiving and their health at baseline compared with the group who benefited. They also experienced lower levels of environmental burden and a trend toward fewer symptoms of depression.
Family caregivers who did not benefit from the intervention tended to be less vulnerable at baseline. Hence, the potential to improve their ratings was smaller than for the group who did benefit.
Determining family caregivers in cancer and palliative care who are more likely to benefit from an intervention needs to be explored further in research.
PubMed ID
26925988 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Ultrasonographic diagnosis of hepatic polycystosis and the place of transcutaneous interventions under ultrasonographic guidance during palliative treatment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89193
Source
Klin Khir. 2008 Oct;(10):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Moshkivs'kyi H Iu
Source
Klin Khir. 2008 Oct;(10):15-8
Date
Oct-2008
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biopsy, Fine-Needle
Cysts - surgery - ultrasonography
Female
Humans
Liver Diseases - surgery - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - methods
Sclerosing Solutions - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The hepatic polycystosis (HPC) signs are studied up and the disease course stages are formulated. Transcutaneous puncture (TCP) under ultrasonographic investigation guidance with subsequent residual cavity sclerotherapy was applied in 53 patients as a method of palliative treatment of the disease. Indications for the method application, the procedure technique and tactics of the patients management were elaborated. The method of a staged treatment using periodical TCP conduction under ultrasonographic guidance was clinically introduced. Its efficacy was proved as a self-supporting method of palliative treatment of the disease in different stages. The best results were obtained after operative treatment for significant HPC in a compensation stage (the first stage--open or laparoscopic fenestration) with subsequent periodical TCP conduction (second stage - supportive treatment). Such combined tactics we consider the most effective method of HPC palliative treatment.
PubMed ID
19405398 View in PubMed
Less detail

Palliative surgery for rectal cancer in a national cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86785
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2008 May;10(4):336-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Sigurdsson H K
Kørner H.
Dahl O.
Skarstein A.
Søreide J A
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2008 May;10(4):336-43
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Palliative Care
Prospective Studies
Rectal Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Registries
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Whether resection of the primary tumour is of benefit to patients with incurable rectal cancer (RC) remains a matter of debate. In this study we analyse prospectively recorded data from a national cohort. METHOD: Among 4831 patients diagnosed with RC between 1997 and 2001, 838 (17%) patients were treated with palliative surgery. Patients were stratified according to disease stage, age and type of surgery. RESULTS: A significantly longer median survival, 12 (range 10-13) months, was observed in patients treated with resection of the primary tumour compared with 5 (range 4-6) months in patients treated with nonresective procedures (P /= 80 years of age). In patients over 80 years, survival was similar regardless of the treatment. Thirty-day mortality varied from 2.5% to 20%, according to age groups. CONCLUSION: The longer survival observed in patients with resection of the primary tumour may partly be explained by patient selection. Elderly patients (>/= 80 years) had a similar survival, irrespective of resection of the primary tumour or not. Careful consideration of the individual patient, extent of disease and treatment-related factors are important in decision-taking for palliative treatment for patients with advanced RC.
PubMed ID
17868410 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Aroma therapy and massage for relieving symptoms of cancer patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176579
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(22):2694; discussion 2695
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

[Quality assurance of pain relief in terminal care. Diagnose the pain and evaluate therapeutic results!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215542
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Mar 29;92(13):1374-7, 1379-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-1995

Management of cutaneous metastases using electrochemotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134485
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Jun;50(5):621-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Louise Wichmann Matthiessen
Richard Ling Chalmers
David Christopher George Sainsbury
Sivakumar Veeramani
Gareth Kessell
Alison Claire Humphreys
Jane Elisabeth Bond
Tobian Muir
Julie Gehl
Author Affiliation
Center for Experimental Drug and Gene Electrotransfer, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Jun;50(5):621-9
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Electrochemotherapy - methods
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Melanoma - drug therapy - pathology
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Palliative Care
Skin Neoplasms - drug therapy - pathology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Cutaneous metastases may cause considerable discomfort as a consequence of ulceration, oozing, bleeding and pain. Electrochemotherapy has proven to be highly effective in the treatment of cutaneous metastases. Electrochemotherapy utilises pulses of electricity to increase the permeability of the cell membrane and thereby augment the effect of chemotherapy. For the drug bleomycin, the effect is enhanced several hundred-fold, enabling once-only treatment. The primary endpoint of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of electrochemotherapy as a palliative treatment.
This phase II study is a collaboration between two centres, one in Denmark and the other in the UK. Patients with cutaneous metastases of any histology were included. Bleomycin was administered intratumourally or intravenously followed by application of electric pulses to the tumour site.
Fifty-two patients were included. Complete and partial response rate was 68% and 18%, respectively, for cutaneous metastases 3 cm. Treatment was well-tolerated by patients, including the elderly, and no serious adverse events were observed.
ECT is an efficient and safe treatment and clinicians should not hesitate to use it even in the elderly.
Notes
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2000 Feb 2;92(3):205-1610655437
Cites: Ann Surg Oncol. 2009 Jan;16(1):191-918987914
Cites: Melanoma Res. 2000 Dec;10(6):585-911198481
Cites: Arch Med Res. 2001 Jul-Aug;32(4):273-611440782
Cites: Acta Physiol Scand. 2003 Apr;177(4):437-4712648161
Cites: Cancer Treat Rev. 2003 Oct;29(5):371-8712972356
Cites: Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 1982;9(1):22-56183016
Cites: Biochem Pharmacol. 1988 Dec 15;37(24):4727-332462423
Cites: C R Acad Sci III. 1991;313(13):613-81723647
Cites: J Am Acad Dermatol. 1993 Aug;29(2 Pt 1):228-368335743
Cites: Cancer Res. 1993 Nov 15;53(22):5462-97693342
Cites: Cancer. 1993 Dec 15;72(12):3694-7007504576
Cites: J Am Acad Dermatol. 1995 Aug;33(2 Pt 1):161-82; quiz 183-67622642
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1995 Sep;81(3):624-97544553
Cites: Cancer. 1996 Mar 1;77(5):956-638608490
Cites: Anticancer Drugs. 1998 Apr;9(4):319-259635922
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1998 Jun;77(12):2336-429649155
Cites: Cancer. 1998 Jul 1;83(1):148-579655305
Cites: Clin Otolaryngol. 2006 Oct;31(5):447-5117014460
Cites: Ann Surg. 2007 Mar;245(3):469-7917435555
Cites: Dermatol Clin. 2008 Jan;26(1):89-102, viii18023773
Cites: Ann Surg Oncol. 2008 Aug;15(8):2215-2218498012
Cites: Anticancer Drugs. 2000 Mar;11(3):201-810831279
PubMed ID
21574833 View in PubMed
Less detail

98 records – page 1 of 10.