Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Leading an intervention for family caregivers-a part of nursing in palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283439
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2017 Apr 02;23(4):166-172
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-02-2017
Author
Maja Holm
Ida Goliath
Hanna Södlind
Anette Alvariza
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2017 Apr 02;23(4):166-172
Date
Apr-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Caregivers
Female
Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing
Humans
Leadership
Middle Aged
Narration
Nurse's Role
Nurses
Practice Patterns, Nurses'
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Professional leadership has been highlighted as an important part of successful intervention delivery. The aim of this study is to explore the narratives of nurses involved in leading a group intervention for family caregivers in palliative care. Nurses were interviewed about their experiences as group leaders in a psycho-educational group intervention, which was delivered at 10 specialised palliative home care settings, with the help of an intervention manual. Data were analysed with interpretive descriptive methodology. Three themes were identified in the analysis: embracing the leading role, developing qualities as a group leader, and professional and personal development. The results showed that the role as group leader initially was a challenge for the nurses, but that they gradually were able to develop the professional and personal skills that were required. The nurses believed that their profession was best suited to lead this kind of supportive intervention.
PubMed ID
28486067 View in PubMed
Less detail

Delivering and participating in a psycho-educational intervention for family caregivers during palliative home care: a qualitative study from the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269257
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2015;14:16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Maja Holm
Ida Carlander
Carl-Johan Fürst
Yvonne Wengström
Kristofer Årestedt
Joakim Öhlen
Anette Henriksson
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2015;14:16
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - education - psychology
Emotions
Family - psychology
Female
Health Personnel - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - methods - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Family caregivers in palliative care have a need for knowledge and support from health professionals, resulting in the need for educational and supportive interventions. However, research has mainly focused on the experiences of family caregivers taking part in interventions. To gain an increased understanding of complex interventions, it is necessary to integrate the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers. Hence, the aim of this study is to explore the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers of delivering and participating in a psycho-educational intervention in palliative home care.
A psycho-educational intervention was designed for family caregivers based on a theoretical framework describing family caregiver's need for knowing, being and doing. The intervention was delivered over three sessions, each of which included a presentation by healthcare professionals from an intervention manual. An interpretive descriptive design was chosen and data were collected through focus group discussions with health professionals and individual interviews with family caregivers. Data were analysed using framework analysis.
From the perspectives of both health professionals and family caregivers, the delivering and participating in the intervention was a positive experience. Although the content was not always adjusted to the family caregivers' individual situation, it was perceived as valuable. Consistently, the intervention was regarded as something that could make family caregivers better prepared for caregiving. Health professionals found that the work with the intervention demanded time and engagement from them and that the manual needed to be adjusted to suit group characteristics, but the experience of delivering the intervention was still something that gave them satisfaction and contributed to them finding insights into their work.
The theoretical framework used in this study seems appropriate to use for the design of interventions to support family caregivers. In the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers, the psycho-educational intervention had important benefits and there was congruence between the two groups in that it provided reward and support. In order for health professionals to carry out psycho-educational interventions, they may be in need of support and supervision as well as securing appropriate time and resources in their everyday work.
Notes
Cites: Palliat Med. 2008 Apr;22(3):270-8018477722
Cites: Palliat Med. 2014 May;28(5):391-40224292156
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2009 Jan;37(1):3-1218538977
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2009 May;18(10):1379-9318624779
Cites: Int J Palliat Nurs. 2009 May;15(5):214-2119491746
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Sep 16;321(7262):694-610987780
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2001 May;34(4):554-6211380724
Cites: Nurs Sci Q. 1999 Jan;12(1):45-5111847651
Cites: Gerontologist. 2002 Jun;42(3):356-7212040138
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 1997 Apr;20(2):169-779100747
Cites: J Palliat Care. 2005 Winter;21(4):277-8416483097
Cites: Palliat Support Care. 2003 Dec;1(4):353-6516594225
Cites: Palliat Med. 2008 Mar;22(2):153-7118372380
Cites: Cancer Nurs. 2010 Jan-Feb;33(1):28-3619926979
Cites: Palliat Med. 2010 Sep;24(6):573-9320562171
Cites: Palliat Med. 2010 Sep;24(6):594-60720576673
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;(6):CD00761721678368
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2011 Jul;14(7):864-921599532
Cites: Palliat Support Care. 2011 Sep;9(3):263-7121838947
Cites: Palliat Med. 2012 Jan;26(1):7-2221737481
Cites: Psychother Psychosom Med Psychol. 2012 May;62(5):157-6222441884
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2012 Sep;20(9):1975-8222072049
Cites: Palliat Med. 2013 Mar;27(3):257-6422562965
Cites: Int J Palliat Nurs. 2014 Oct;20(10):494-50125350215
Cites: Psychooncology. 2012 Aug;21(8):886-9521557383
Cites: Palliat Med. 2008 Dec;22(8):971-218952753
Cites: Nurse Res. 2013 Mar;20(4):12-723520707
Cites: Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 Aug;88(8):859-6523910412
Cites: Psychooncology. 2013 Sep;22(9):1987-9323335153
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2013 Nov;69(11):2423-3123517523
Cites: Palliat Support Care. 2015 Jun;13(3):767-7524909814
PubMed ID
25903781 View in PubMed
Less detail