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173 records – page 1 of 18.

Source
Probe. 1997 May-Jun;31(3):92
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Bennett
Author Affiliation
Hospice of Peel, Inc.
Source
Probe. 1997 May-Jun;31(3):92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospice Care
Humans
Ontario
Palliative Care
Abstract
Hospice of Peel is a community-based hospice serving a population of between 750-800,000. Hospice care evolved to meet the needs of the terminally ill. It can, and does, take many forms, as you will see in the brief case scenarios detailed below. The individuals and situations described are real and typical of day-to-day-hospice care in a large urban environment. Both the sick and their families are in need of support and assistance to enable them to cope during this time of crisis in their lives. Increased awareness of hospice care is resulting in more and more people with a life-threatening or terminal illness and their families turning to hospice care.
PubMed ID
9611457 View in PubMed
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Bringing palliative care to the homeless.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136244
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Apr 5;183(6):E317-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-2011
Author
Roger Collier
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Apr 5;183(6):E317-8
Date
Apr-5-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Homeless Persons
Humans
Ontario
Palliative Care - organization & administration
PubMed ID
21398243 View in PubMed
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When does palliative care begin? A needs assessment of cancer patients with recurrent disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216662
Source
J Palliat Care. 1995;11(3):53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
H M Balfour
Source
J Palliat Care. 1995;11(3):53
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Ontario
Palliative Care
Notes
Comment On: J Palliat Care. 1995 Spring;11(1):5-97538573
ErratumFor: J Palliat Care. 1995 Spring;11(1):5-97538573
PubMed ID
7472797 View in PubMed
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Effect of current palliative treatment on the survival of patients with breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250475
Source
Can J Surg. 1977 Jan;20(1):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1977
Author
J E Devitt
D A Advent
Source
Can J Surg. 1977 Jan;20(1):46-50
Date
Jan-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Humans
Neoplasm Metastasis
Ontario
Palliative Care
Abstract
The length of survival of 302 patients with breast cancer first treated between 1946 and 1949, who had mostly only contemporary radiotherapy for metastases, has been reviewed and compared with that of 578 patients, first treated between 1966 and 1969, who had modern endocrine therapy, cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Although patients in the latter group demonstrated a significantly increased length of survival after the first metastases appeared, these differences were not substantial. In spite of impressive regressions in some patients with metastatic breast cancer after modern palliative therapy, the median survival after the first appearance of metastases has been increased only by about 6 months.
PubMed ID
64291 View in PubMed
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A palliative care service: from concept to implementation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245366
Source
CHAC Rev. 1980 Nov-Dec;8(6):11-7
Publication Type
Article

Pharmacist as a member of the palliative care team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235190
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1987 Jun;40(3):95-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987
Author
T W Dean
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1987 Jun;40(3):95-6
Date
Jun-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Ontario
Palliative Care
Patient care team
Pharmacists
Pharmacy Service, Hospital
PubMed ID
10315734 View in PubMed
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Limits to multidisciplinary education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213475
Source
J Palliat Care. 1996;12(2):6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996

Ontario, Canada: using networks to integrate palliative care province-wide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163741
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007 May;33(5):640-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Deborah Dudgeon
Vida Vaitonis
Hsien Seow
Susan King
Helen Angus
Carol Sawka
Author Affiliation
Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. dudgeond@kgh.kari.net
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007 May;33(5):640-4
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Ontario
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Abstract
Ontario, a Canadian province, identified the lack of coordination, integration, and consistency of end-of-life care services as barriers to quality palliative care. To address these barriers, various governmental, organizational, and community-level initiatives were implemented. The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care enacted an End-of-Life Care Strategy in 2005 aimed at shifting care from acute settings to appropriate alternate settings of care; enhancing client-centered and interdisciplinary service capacity; and improving access, coordination, and consistency of services. Crucial to accomplishing the strategy was the establishment of End-of-Life Networks within health care planning regions. The networks were instrumental in developing end-of-life care service delivery models in the various regions, bringing key stakeholders together toward a common vision, and building strong collaborations across providers and settings. Cancer Care Ontario, an organization dedicated to improving cancer care at the regional and provincial levels, also leads improvements in palliative care through the implementation of a palliative strategy for cancer patients aimed at improved measurement of quality indicators, increased use of evidence and standards, and increased efficiency and access to care. A regional network of organizations in Southeastern Ontario created a quality improvement project, the Palliative Care Integration Project (PCIP), which disseminated common symptom assessment tools, collaborative care plans, and evidence-based guidelines across the continuum of care. The PCIP was embraced by key stakeholders across the province as a model intervention to better coordinate, integrate, and standardize palliative care service delivery, and is currently being spread across all regions of the province.
PubMed ID
17482061 View in PubMed
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An interdisciplinary approach to a day-long palliative care course for undergraduate students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200649
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Sep 21;161(6):729-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-21-1999
Author
E J Latimer
A. Deakin
C. Ingram
L. O'Brien
M. Smoke
L. Wishart
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University.
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Sep 21;161(6):729-31
Date
Sep-21-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Palliative Care
Problem-Based Learning
Abstract
Although it is desirable that students in the health sciences be educated together to prepare them for interdisciplinary practice, many educational programs remain discipline specific. An undergraduate course in palliative care, originally designed for medical students at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., was expanded in 1993 to include students from various health sciences programs in the region. The course introduces students to the components of palliative care and its interdisciplinary nature in a problem-based way and directs students to additional educational resources. The authors describe the planning, content and evaluation of the course material. The observed decline in attendance by medical students, which coincided with the introduction of the interdisciplinary format, warrants further investigation. Future directions of the course are discussed.
Notes
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Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1994 Mar;19(3):552-77516940
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 1991 Jul;6(5):329-361856509
Cites: Recent Results Cancer Res. 1991;121:414-221713343
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1992 Spring;8(1):47-531583569
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 1994 Jan;2(1):7-157512415
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Cites: J Palliat Care. 1993 Winter;9(4):5-107510805
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Cites: CMAJ. 1991 Apr 1;144(7):859-641706641
PubMed ID
10513281 View in PubMed
Less detail

The new Palliative Care Outreach Program--a resounding success.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200886
Source
Support Care Cancer. 1999 Sep;7(5):298-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
M. Hess
Author Affiliation
Palliative Care Outreach Program, Nepean, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Support Care Cancer. 1999 Sep;7(5):298-301
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Institutional Relations
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Ontario
Palliative Care
Abstract
The Palliative Care Outreach Program provides consultation, medical care, and psychosocial, emotional and spiritual support to palliative care patients and their families in an out-patient setting. In just over 1 year of operation, the program has proved to be an essential community-based service.
PubMed ID
10483814 View in PubMed
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173 records – page 1 of 18.