Skip header and navigation

Refine By

53 records – page 1 of 6.

When does palliative care begin? A needs assessment of cancer patients with recurrent disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216662
Source
J Palliat Care. 1995;11(3):53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
H M Balfour
Source
J Palliat Care. 1995;11(3):53
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Ontario
Palliative Care
Notes
Comment On: J Palliat Care. 1995 Spring;11(1):5-97538573
ErratumFor: J Palliat Care. 1995 Spring;11(1):5-97538573
PubMed ID
7472797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pediatric palliative care in Canada and the United States: a qualitative metasummary of the needs of patients and families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114980
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 May;16(5):566-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Moire Stevenson
Marie Achille
Tziona Lugasi
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. moirestevenson@gmail.com
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 May;16(5):566-77
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Palliative Care
Pediatrics
Terminal Care
United States
Abstract
Qualitative research is becoming more common in pediatric palliative care and end-of-life care. The present article systematically reviews and summarizes qualitative and survey-based research on pediatric palliative and end-of-life care pertaining to the needs of patients and their families.
Twenty-one qualitative and survey-based studies published between 2000 and 2010 that met the selection criteria were retrieved from MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL. All studies reported on the needs of patients and families receiving pediatric palliative and end-of-life care--from either the patient's, parent's, sibling's, or health care provider's perspective. Findings from these studies were aggregated using a metasummary technique.
Findings were extracted and grouped into the following 10 thematic domains pertaining to patient and family needs: interactions with staff, health care delivery and accessibility, information needs, bereavement needs, psychosocial needs, spiritual needs, pain and symptom management, cultural needs, sibling's needs, and decision making.
The results of this metasummary highlight the needs of patients and families to be taken into consideration in the creation of high-quality pediatric palliative and end-of-life care services and guidelines.
PubMed ID
23556988 View in PubMed
Less detail

Planning a regional palliative care services network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231232
Source
J Palliat Care. 1989 Mar;5(1):42-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989
Author
G N Zalot
Source
J Palliat Care. 1989 Mar;5(1):42-6
Date
Mar-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Palliative Care
Regional Health Planning
Terminal Care
Abstract
Table 1 summarizes the role of task force members and staff for each of the main tasks of the process of planning. The number of meetings required for each stage of the process is estimated in the last column. Planning for a regional palliative care services network is a process involving "hard" and "soft" elements. Hard elements involve the organizational structure, task force meetings, information/statistical data bases and the discrete tasks summarized in Table 1. These elements are well known, if nokt always well organized in practice. It is the "softer" elements that usually mean the difference between a dull bureaucratic exercise and a creative exchange of ideas and concepts with a vision for the future. Not to be underestimated is the critical role of group development in this process. The Task Force, supported by professional staff expertise and judgment, hopes to achieve a level of group development termed "synergy," that is, where the group outperforms (in terms of quality and quantity of work) its best individual member. Not a small feat, but critical to a successful planning exercise! Any regional planning implies a commitment to change. After all, new services will be added, some phased out, others revised, and others enhanced, resulting in changes in roles and responsibilities of providers. Change should not be greeted with disdain but viewed as a natural part of the environment in which we plan and provide services. A major advantage to the process of planning is that the level of support for change is already mobilized through the various stages of the process highlighted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2469785 View in PubMed
Less detail

Responding to a cry for help: a frontline perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189114
Source
J Palliat Care. 2002;18(2):129
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002

Nurses' perspectives on the discharge of cancer patients with palliative care needs from a gastroenterology ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107836
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2013 Aug;19(8):396-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Ina Marie Thon Aamodt
Irene Lie
Ragnhild Hellesø
Author Affiliation
Assistant Professor, Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Lovisenberg gata 15b, 0456 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2013 Aug;19(8):396-402
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Gastroenterology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Norway
Nursing Staff - psychology
Palliative Care
Patient Discharge
Abstract
People with cancer usually like to spend as much time as possible at home rather than in the hospital. Nurses have a pivotal role when patients are discharged to a unit in hospital or from hospital to the community health-care system.
To explore how frontline surgical nurses assess patients with gastrointestinal cancer receiving palliative care and the implications of their assessment and competency for the patients' discharge destinations.
A descriptive exploratory approach was used involving focus group interviews with a purposive sample of ten nurses from an inpatient gastroenterology surgical ward at a university hospital in Norway. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using Kvale and Brinkman's thematic approach.
Two overall themes emerged that had implications for the nurses' recommendations for optimal patient follow-up care after discharge: 'the complexity of and fluctuations in the patients' health status' and 'considering the competency of the nurses at the discharge destinations'.
This study illustrates surgical nurses' perspectives on the discharge destinations of cancer patients receiving palliative care. The findings have implications for initiatives aimed at providing more home-based palliative care.
PubMed ID
23970296 View in PubMed
Less detail

Families' transition to a Canadian paediatric hospice. Part one: planning a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156636
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 May;14(5):248-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Rose Steele
Sarah Derman
Susan Cadell
Betty Davies
Hal Siden
Lynn Straatman
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, Canada. rsteele@yorku.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 May;14(5):248-56
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Health planning
Health services needs and demand
Hospices - organization & administration
Humans
Palliative Care
Pediatrics
Pilot Projects
Abstract
This article describes the rationale for planning and conducting a qualitative pilot study about families' transition to a Canadian paediatric hospice. Discussion includes: background information and a literature review pertinent to the study; debate around the term 'hospice' versus 'palliative care'; the different and unique needs of children requiring a palliative approach compared with adult hospice patients; and information about planning and beginning the study, including the rationale for a pilot, details about the study site, recruitment and procedures, and data collection and analysis. The results from the pilot study, as well as implications for practice and research are reported in part two.
PubMed ID
18563018 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canada: status of cancer pain and palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220637
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 1993 Aug;8(6):395-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
B M Mount
J. Scott
S R Cohen
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 1993 Aug;8(6):395-8
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Education, Medical
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Palliative Care - trends
Notes
Comment In: J Pain Symptom Manage. 1994 Jul;9(5):291-27525786
PubMed ID
7525759 View in PubMed
Less detail

Towards a focus on the sick and dying.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203281
Source
CHAC Rev. 1998;26(2):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
J. Ayoub
Author Affiliation
Notre-Dame Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
CHAC Rev. 1998;26(2):8-12
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health services needs and demand
Holistic Health
Humans
Pain Management
Palliative Care
Religion and Medicine
Stress, Psychological
Terminal Care - standards
PubMed ID
10185340 View in PubMed
Less detail

53 records – page 1 of 6.