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Should physicians be open to euthanasia?: NO.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144199
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Apr;56(4):321-3, 325-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Hubert Marcoux
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Suite 4486, Pavillon Vandry, 1050, Avenue de la médecine, Quebec, QC G1K 7P4. hubert.marcoux@mfa.ulaval.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Apr;56(4):321-3, 325-7
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary - ethics
Humans
Palliative Care
Personal Autonomy
Questionnaires
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Aug 2;362(9381):345-5012907005
Cites: N Z Med J. 2004 Jun 18;117(1196):U93415280938
Cites: Med J Aust. 1997 Feb 17;166(4):191-69066548
Cites: Palliat Med. 2006 Jan;20(1):3-1016482752
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Sep;45(6):887-929255921
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Apr 23;338(17):1193-2019554861
Cites: BMJ. 2005 May 7;330(7499):104115879373
Cites: Medicina (B Aires). 1996;56(4):369-779138341
PubMed ID
20393084 View in PubMed
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Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271455
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2016 Jan;22(1):28-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Carina Lundh Hagelin
Christina Melin-Johansson
Ingela Henoch
Ingrid Bergh
Kristina Ek
Kina Hammarlund
Charlotte Prahl
Susann Strang
Lars Westin
Jane Österlind
Maria Browall
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2016 Jan;22(1):28-36
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Female
Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - psychology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Students, Nursing - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated.
The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used.
Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude.
Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students' attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.
PubMed ID
26804954 View in PubMed
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Practical care work and existential issues in palliative care: experiences of nursing assistants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264967
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2014 Dec;9(4):298-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Elizabeth Ahsberg
Maria Carlsson
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2014 Dec;9(4):298-305
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Existentialism
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Nurses' Aides
Palliative Care
Sweden
Abstract
Despite increasing international interest in palliative care, little focus has been given to the role of nursing assistants, nor to research on existential issues.
To investigate nursing assistants' experiences of existential issues in palliative care.
An explorative study using focus group discussions as data. Seven nursing assistants working in a palliative care unit and a nursing home participated on three occasions.
Data were analysed using a content analysis approach.
Two overlapping domains were extracted: practical care, interpreted in themes as meeting others, the patient's body and organisational boundaries; and existential issues, interpreted as the difficult part, the valuable part and death and dying. Communication seemed to be a theme central to both domains.
The results indicate that nursing assistants may give existential support in addition to practical aspects of care. The intimate interactions inherent in practical aspects of personal care create opportunities for meaningful conversations. Such conversations may constitute existential support for patients and a meaningful task for staff.
PubMed ID
23782933 View in PubMed
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Hospice program eases fear, pain and loneliness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238054
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1985 Dec;62(10):28-9, 37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1985

Dying with dignity according to Swedish medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83170
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Apr;14(4):334-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Karlsson Marit
Milberg Anna
Strang Peter
Author Affiliation
Unit of Advanced Palliative Home Care, LAH-kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset i Linköping, 58185, Linkoping, Sweden. marit.karlsson@lio.se
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Apr;14(4):334-9
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Euthanasia
Humans
Palliative Care
Questionnaires
Right to Die
Students, Medical
Sweden
Abstract
GOAL OF WORK: To die with dignity is an important but ambiguous concept, and it is used in contradictory contexts, both for the promotion of palliative care and as an argument for euthanasia. Our goal was to explore medical students' definition of a dignified death. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A questionnaire containing open-ended questions was answered anonymously by 165 first- and fifth-year medical students. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis with no predetermined categories. MAIN RESULTS: The students' descriptions of a dignified death resulted in five categories of death: (1) without suffering, (2) with limited medical interventions, (3) with a sense of security, which implied a safe environment nursed by professional staff, (4) with autonomy, respect for the individual and empowerment to the patient and (5) with acceptance. These findings show similarity to the established concepts of a good death, as well as the view of a dignified death by terminally ill patients. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that the students perceive that the medical system is over-treating patients and sometimes causing harm to dying patients. The results reveal a potential misunderstanding and contradiction relating to death without suffering and the use of necessary palliative interventions. These findings are important when planning education as regards palliative care and dignified death.
PubMed ID
16231123 View in PubMed
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[Good palliative care in the intensive care unit].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113918
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2013 Mar;(112):61-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Diane Guay
Cécile Michaud
Luc Mathieu
Author Affiliation
Faculté de médecine et des sciences de la santé, Ecole des sciences infirmières, Universitè de Sherbrooke. diane.guay@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2013 Mar;(112):61-75
Date
Mar-2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Humans
Intensive Care
Intensive Care Units
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Palliative Care
Quebec
Abstract
The aging population, the complexity and irreversibility of certain conditions lead to the deaths of 20% of patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). However, in Quebec, as elsewhere in America, few of them currently receive palliative care.
inspired by a conceptual model considering nursing as a moral practice, this phenomenological study was conducted in four phases: focus groups (n = 6) observation sessions (n = 6) followed by individual interviews and group validation activities (n = 5). In its first part, this study shows that through several caring behaviours, "good palliative care" in the ICU is manifested by the consideration of six dimensions of the person, physical, relational, psychological, moral, social and spiritual. This article presents the second part of this study and reveals three main themes summarizing the conditions facilitating "good the palliative care" according to ICU nurses: Sharing a common vision enhanced by a collective and specific palliative care knowledge, an informed and concerted decision-making process in a favourable organisational and physical environment.
PubMed ID
23671987 View in PubMed
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Directions for palliative care nursing in Canada: report of a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216663
Source
J Palliat Care. 1995;11(3):5-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
L J Kristjanson
L. Balneaves
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 1995;11(3):5-8
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Humans
Palliative Care - trends
Patient care team
Societies, Nursing
Specialties, Nursing - organization & administration
Abstract
This paper reports the results of a national survey of palliative care nurses conducted following a meeting of nurses at the Fifth Canadian Palliative Care Association Conference in 1993. The intent of the survey was to obtain information about Canadian palliative care nurses's perceptions of practice and professional issues. Eighty percent of respondents believed that palliative care nurses should form a palliative care nurses' organization, with the majority recommending that this occur under the auspices of the Canadian Palliative Care Association. Key issues of importance to palliative care nurses were identified. The two major issues of concern were (a) the need to develop standards of practice and (b) educational needs of palliative care nurses. Respondents also emphasized the importance of maintaining and fostering an interdisciplinary approach to palliative care. Results of this survey are to be further discussed at the Sixth Canadian Palliative Care Association Conference to be held in Halifax in October 1995.
PubMed ID
7472794 View in PubMed
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The collective voice: Legitimation strategies in focus group discussions with nurses in municipal palliative care for older people in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268857
Source
Commun Med. 2014;11(2):167-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Henrik Rahm
Magdalena Andersson
Anna-karin Edberg
Source
Commun Med. 2014;11(2):167-77
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Focus Groups
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Palliative Care - organization & administration - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
This paper explores focus group discussions of registered nurses in municipal palliative care for older people, using data collected by researchers with an interest in health sciences. The linguistically based discourse analyis builds on a combination of Bakhtinian notions of dialogicity, the Other and addressivity, the use of quotations, and also van Leeuwen's framework for legitimation in discourse. The aim is to investigate strategies of addressing and legitimizing palliative care. Three types of narrative are discerned: the cautionary tale, fictionalization of professional experiences and the enactment of a fictive dialogue. The other professions involved (physicians, assistant nurses) are positioned as the Other as a means of legitimizing the perspectives of the registered nurses. As the patients and their next of kin are the objects of professional activities, the notion of the Third (connecting to the Other) is proposed. The objectification is a manifestation of commitment with routinized and professional distance to the patients.
PubMed ID
26596124 View in PubMed
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[Organizational and socio-medical problems of palliative care in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153193
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2008;(10):68-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
V Z Kucherenko
N V Ekkert
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2008;(10):68-72
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Euthanasia - ethics
Hospices - organization & administration
Humans
Palliative Care - ethics - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Russia
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The system of palliative care to the population is being formed in Russia. This article considers stages of this work and results of research on organizational and socio-medical aspects of palliative care. Scientifically substantiated proposals on the development of the hospice service in all territorial units of the Russian Federation based on recommendations of the World Health Organization are presented.
PubMed ID
19140402 View in PubMed
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Work culture among healthcare personnel in a palliative medicine unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119559
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2013 Apr;11(2):135-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Beate André
Endre Sjøvold
Toril Rannestad
Marte Holmemo
Gerd I Ringdal
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources, The Sør-Trøndelag University College and Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. beate.andre@ntnu.no
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2013 Apr;11(2):135-40
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Norway
Organizational Culture
Palliative Care
Questionnaires
Abstract
Understanding and assessing health care personnel's work culture in palliative care is important, as a conflict between "high tech" and "high touch" is present. Implementing necessary changes in behavior and procedures may imply a profound challenge, because of this conflict. The aim of this study was to explore the work culture at a palliative medicine unit (PMU).
Healthcare personnel (N = 26) at a PMU in Norway comprising physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, and others filled in a questionnaire about their perception of the work culture at the unit. The Systematizing Person-Group Relations (SPGR) method was used for gathering data and for the analyses. This method applies six different dimensions representing different aspects of a work culture (Synergy, Withdrawal, Opposition, Dependence, Control, and Nurture) and each dimension has two vectors applied. The method seeks to explore which aspects dominate the particular work culture, identifying challenges, limitations, and opportunities. The findings were compared with a reference group of 347 ratings of well-functioning Norwegian organizations, named the "Norwegian Norm."
The healthcare personnel working at the PMU had significantly higher scores than the "Norwegian Norm" in both vectors in the "Withdrawal" dimension and significant lower scores in both vectors in the "Synergy," "Control," and "Dependence" dimensions.
Healthcare personnel at the PMU have a significantly different perception of their work culture than do staff in "well-functioning organizations" in several dimensions. The low score in the "Synergy" and "Control" dimensions indicate lack of engagement and constructive goal orientation behavior, and not being in a position to change their behavior. The conflict between "high tech" and "high touch" at a PMU seems to be an obstacle when implementing new procedures and alternative courses of action.
PubMed ID
23089522 View in PubMed
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136 records – page 1 of 14.