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[The main principles of concept of development of palliative care to children and adolescents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263972
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2015 Jan-Feb;23(1):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
I V Viniarskaia
N V Ustinova
A A Baranov
V Yu Albitskii
N N Savva
O V Krasko
E V Kumirova
A G Pritiko
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2015 Jan-Feb;23(1):46-50
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Humans
Palliative Care - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Abstract
The article substantiates actuality of elaboration of the concept of development of palliative care of children and adolescents. The analysis of legislative and normative legal base, international documents, scientific studies related to this issue are analyzed. The situation in the regions ofthe Russian Federation is examined concerning organization of palliative care of children and its forms, provision of pharmaceuticals and specialized equipment and professional training of specialists. The demand of children population in palliative care in Russia is calculated according data of 2012. The results of carried out study are used as a basis of determining measures of development of system of palliative care of children and adolescents in the Russian Federation to propose as a foundation for the National concept as a necessary condition for organization of effective and efficient service.
PubMed ID
26012280 View in PubMed
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Pediatric palliative care: a qualitative study of physicians' perspectives in a tertiary care university hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157332
Source
J Palliat Care. 2008;24(1):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Thérèse St-Laurent-Gagnon
Franco A Carnevale
Michel Duval
Author Affiliation
Centre de réadaptation Marie-Enfant and Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2008;24(1):26-30
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Palliative Care
Pediatrics
Physician's Practice Patterns
Quebec
Abstract
The objective of this study was to assess the concept of palliative care for a group of physicians in a tertiary care pediatric university hospital. Grounded theory methodology was used. Data included 12 semistructured interviews, field notes, research consent forms, research protocols, and articles published by the participants. Physicians involved in both research and clinical care of severely ill children were interviewed. Data analysis identified three principal themes. First, physicians limited their concept of palliative care to the relief of physical symptoms, equating palliative care with comfort care. Second, there was variation regarding the appropriate moment to introduce palliative care for children. Finally, many physicians were not comfortable using the term "palliative care". Although this study was conducted in one Canadian centre, the results raise questions that should be examined in other settings. A vague concept of palliative care may delay the provision of palliative care to children.
PubMed ID
18459594 View in PubMed
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Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271455
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2016 Jan;22(1):28-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Carina Lundh Hagelin
Christina Melin-Johansson
Ingela Henoch
Ingrid Bergh
Kristina Ek
Kina Hammarlund
Charlotte Prahl
Susann Strang
Lars Westin
Jane Österlind
Maria Browall
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2016 Jan;22(1):28-36
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Female
Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - psychology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Students, Nursing - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated.
The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used.
Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude.
Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students' attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.
PubMed ID
26804954 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Duodecim. 1990;106(4):352-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
T. Leino
Author Affiliation
Pirkanmaan Hoitokoti, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Duodecim. 1990;106(4):352-9
Date
1990
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Female
Finland
Hospice Care
Hospices
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Palliative Care
PubMed ID
1727023 View in PubMed
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[Paediatric palliative care in Denmark should be strengthened].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288214
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Sep 01;176(36)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-01-2014
Author
Bodil Abild Jespersen
Niels Clausen
Per Sjøgren
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Sep 01;176(36)
Date
Sep-01-2014
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Family
Humans
Infant
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Palliative Care - standards
Patient care team
Abstract
Paediatric palliative care is the total care for the child's body, mind and spirit, and involves support to the family. It begins when a life-threatening disease is diagnosed and depends on an interdisciplinary team approach. In 2013, 295 children under the age of 16 years died in Denmark. Of these, 195 were less than one year old. Most children and their families may prefer death at home if possible. Early planning allows for better integration of home-care services and ensures that death occurs at the place that is best for the child and family.
PubMed ID
25293860 View in PubMed
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Public awareness of palliative care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292197
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Jun; 46(4):478-487
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Caroline Westerlund
Carol Tishelman
Inger Benkel
Carl Johan Fürst
Ulla Molander
Birgit H Rasmussen
Sylvia Sauter
Olav Lindqvist
Author Affiliation
1 Geriatrik Department, Jakobsbergs Hospital, Järfälla, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Jun; 46(4):478-487
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the awareness of palliative care (PC) in a general Swedish population.
We developed an e-survey based on a similar study conducted in Northern Ireland, consisting of 10 questions. Closed questions were primarily analyzed using descriptive statistics. Open questions were subject to inductive qualitative analysis.
The study utilized a population sample of 7684 persons aged 18-66, of which 2020 responded, stratified by gender, age and region.
Most participants reported 'no' ( n = 827, 41%) or 'some' ( n = 863, 43%) awareness of PC. Being female or older were associated with higher levels of awareness, as was a university-level education, working in a healthcare setting and having a friend or family member receiving PC. Most common sources of knowledge were the media, close friends and relatives receiving PC, as well as working in a healthcare setting. Aims of PC were most frequently identified as 'care before death', 'pain relief', 'dignity' and a 'peaceful death'. The preferred place of care and death was one's own home. The main barriers to raising awareness about PC were fear, shame and taboo, along with perceived lack of information and/or personal relevance. The term 'palliative care' was said to be unfamiliar by many. A number of strategies to enhance awareness and access to PC were suggested, largely reflecting the previously identified barriers.
This survey found limited awareness of palliative care in an adult sample of the Swedish general public = 66 years, and points to a more widespread disempowerment surrounding end-of-life issues.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Aug;139:1-8 PMID 26121179
Cites: N Z Med J. 2012 Jan 20;125(1348):51-60 PMID 22282277
Cites: Palliat Med. 2008 Apr;22(3):222-32 PMID 18477716
Cites: BMC Palliat Care. 2013 Sep 17;12(1):34 PMID 24044631
Cites: Palliat Med. 2004 Jul;18(5):460-7 PMID 15332424
Cites: J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother. 2014 Jun;28(2):130-4 PMID 24779434
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1984;18(9):713-23 PMID 6729531
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Mar;28(1):204-11 PMID 23383751
Cites: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2004 Mar-Apr;21(2):105-10 PMID 15055509
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 9;169(5):480-8 PMID 19273778
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2000 Fall;3(3):287-300 PMID 15859670
Cites: Prog Palliat Care. 2016 Jan 2;24(1):19-24 PMID 27134417
Cites: Palliat Med. 2007 Mar;21(2):145-53 PMID 17344263
Cites: Ann Ist Super Sanita. 2011;47(3):253-9 PMID 21952149
Cites: Palliat Med. 2004 Apr;18(3):239-47 PMID 15198137
PubMed ID
29301481 View in PubMed
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Symptom clusters in patients with advanced cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152855
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2009 Sep;17(9):1223-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Winson Y Cheung
Lisa W Le
Camilla Zimmermann
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2009 Sep;17(9):1223-30
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Cluster analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Ontario
Palliative Care
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
It has been observed that certain cancer symptoms frequently occur together. Prior research on symptom patterns has focused mainly on inpatients, early stage cancers, or a single cancer type or metastatic site. Our aim was to explore symptom clusters among outpatients with different advanced cancers.
Symptom scores by the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) were routinely collected for patients attending the Oncology Palliative Care Clinics at Princess Margaret Hospital from January 2005 to October 2007. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed for the entire patient cohort and within specific disease sites to determine inter-relationships of the nine ESAS symptoms.
A total of 1,366 patients was included: 682 (50%) were male and 684 (50%) were female. The median age was 64 years (range 18 to 74 years). The most common primary cancer sites were gastrointestinal (27%), lung (14%), and breast (11%). The three most distressful symptoms were fatigue, poor general well-being, and decreased appetite. PCA of symptoms for the entire patient cohort revealed two major symptom clusters: cluster 1 included fatigue, drowsiness, nausea, decreased appetite, and dyspnea, which accounted for 45% of the total variance; cluster 2 included anxiety and depression, which accounted for 10% of the total variance. There was high internal reliability in the clusters (Cronbach's alpha coefficient approximately 0.80). PCA of symptoms within the various primary cancer sites revealed differences in the pattern of symptom clusters.
In patients with advanced cancers, distinct symptom clusters can be identified, which are influenced by primary cancer site. Treatments directed at symptom clusters rather than individual symptoms may provide greater therapeutic benefit. Further prospective studies are warranted in order to develop more effective targeted palliative interventions for the advanced cancer patient population.
PubMed ID
19184126 View in PubMed
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The turning point: Clinical identification of dying and reorientation of care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79326
Source
J Palliat Med. 2006 Dec;9(6):1348-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Jakobsson Eva
Bergh Ingrid
Gaston-Johansson Fannie
Stolt Carl-Magnus
Ohlén Joakim
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Caring Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Nursing, Gothenburg, Sweden. Eva.jakobsson@his.se
Source
J Palliat Med. 2006 Dec;9(6):1348-58
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Sweden
Terminally ill
Triage
Abstract
Palliative care is increasingly organized within the setting of formal health care systems but the demarcation has become unclear between, on the one hand, care directed at cure and rehabilitation and palliative care aimed at relief of suffering on the other. With the purpose to increase the understanding about the turning point reflecting identification of dying and reorientation of care, this study explores this phenomenon as determined from health care records of a representative sample (n = 229). A turning point was identified in 160 records. Presence of circulatory diseases, sporadic confinement to bed, and deterioration of condition had a significant impact upon the incidence of such turning point. The time interval between the turning point and actual death ranged between one and 210 days. Thirty percent of these turning points were documented within the last day of life, 33% during the last 2-7 days, 19.5% during the last 8-30 days, 13% during the last 31-90 days, and 4.5% during the last 91-210 days of life. The time interval between the turning point and actual death was significantly longer among individuals with neoplasm(s) and significantly shorter among individuals suffering from musculoskeletal diseases. Perhaps this reflects a discrepancy between the ideals of palliative care, and a misinterpretation of the meaning of palliative care in everyday clinical practice. The findings underscore that improvement in timing of clinical identification of dying and reorientation of care will likely favour a shift from life-extending care to palliative care.
PubMed ID
17187543 View in PubMed
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Palliative Care Research--A Systematic Review of foci, designs and methods of research conducted in Sweden between 2007 and 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280717
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2016 Mar;30(1):5-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Ingela Henoch
Ida Carlander
Maja Holm
Inger James
Elisabeth Kenne Sarenmalm
Carina Lundh Hagelin
Susanne Lind
Anna Sandgren
Joakim Öhlén
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2016 Mar;30(1):5-25
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Female
History, 21st Century
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Research Design
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2007, a literature review was undertaken of palliative care research from Sweden during the 1970s-2006, paving the way for a follow-up study to explore the recent developments. The aim was to systematically examine palliative care research from Sweden between 2007 and 2012, with special attention to methods, designs and research foci.
A literature review was undertaken. The databases Academic search elite, Age line, Ahmed, Cinahl, PsychInfo, PubMed, Scopus, Soc abstracts, Web of science and Libris were reviewed for Swedish palliative care research studies published from 2007 to 2012, applying the search criteria 'palliative care OR palliative medicine OR end-of-life care OR terminal care OR hospice care OR dying OR death'.
A total of 263 papers met the inclusion criteria, indicating an increased volume of research compared to the 133 articles identified in the previous review. Common study foci were symptom assessment and management, experiences of illness and care planning. Targeting non-cancer-specific populations and utilisation of population-based register studies were identified as new features. There was continued domination of cross-sectional, qualitative and mono-disciplinary studies, not including ethnic minority groups, nonverbally communicable people or children
PubMed ID
26190052 View in PubMed
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Caring together: summary of a report submitted to Health and Welfare Canada (December, 1987). The Expert Working Group on Integrated Palliative Care for Persons with AIDS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232129
Source
J Palliat Care. 1988 Dec;4(4):76-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988

85 records – page 1 of 9.