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Striving for emotional survival in palliative cancer nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16620
Source
Qual Health Res. 2006 Jan;16(1):79-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Anna Sandgren
Hans Thulesius
Bengt Fridlund
Kerstin Petersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2006 Jan;16(1):79-96
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Emotions
Humans
Neoplasms - nursing
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Palliative Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
In this grounded theory study, the authors analyze interviews and participant observation data related to palliative cancer nursing in hospitals. Striving for Emotional Survival emerged as the pattern of behavior through which nurses deal with their main concern, the risk of being emotionally overloaded by their work. It involved three main strategies: Emotional Shielding through Professional Shielding or Cold Shielding; Emotional Processing through Chatting, Confirmation Seeking, Self-Reflecting, or Ruminating; and Emotional Postponing through Storing or Stashing. Emotional Competence is a property of Striving for Emotional Survival that explains more or less adequate ways of dealing with emotional overload. The theory Striving for Emotional Survival can be useful in the nurses' daily work and provides a comprehensive framework for understanding how nurses deal with emotional difficulties. The authors suggest that health care organizations encourage self-care, prioritize time to talk, and offer counseling to nursing staff with emotionally difficult working conditions.
PubMed ID
16317178 View in PubMed
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Elderly palliative care cancer patients' descriptions of hope-fostering strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178418
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2004 Jul;10(7):352-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Wendy Duggleby
Karen Wright
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan College of Nursing, Health Sciences Building, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E5, Canada. duggleby@sask.usask.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2004 Jul;10(7):352-9
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Morale
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care
Saskatchewan
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe perceptions of hope-fostering strategies of elderly patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative home care. Using a qualitative thematic research design, saturation was reached with 10 palliative home care patients (mean age 75 years) (five males and five females). Face-to-face audiotaped interviews were conducted in the participants' homes. Participants described hope for: "not suffering more", "living life to the fullest in the little time I have left", a peaceful death, life after death and "hope for a better life in the future" for their family. Using Lubrosky's thematic analysis, themes of fostering their hope were: leaving a legacy, achieving short-term goals, "turn your mind off", supportive family and friends, symbols of hope, positive thoughts, honest information and symptom control.
PubMed ID
15365488 View in PubMed
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[Health promotion of the elderly: a conceptual matter].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178476
Source
Sante Publique. 2004 Jun;16(2):303-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
S. Lafrenière
Author Affiliation
CHSLD de la MRC Champlain, 831 Notre-Dame, St-Lambert, Québec, Canada J4R 151. isadomi@sympatico.ca
Source
Sante Publique. 2004 Jun;16(2):303-12
Date
Jun-2004
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Community Health Nursing
Geriatric Nursing
Health promotion
Humans
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Palliative Care
Quebec
Abstract
Although community health nurses have to face the increasing needs in curative and palliative care, they still engage in health promotion activities for the elderly, mainly cognitive and behavioural ones. The Quebec community health nurses who choose the McGill model of nursing, are able to integrate health promotion interventions in their daily practice with old aged people. In fact, this model helps these nurses consider the elderly, health, sickness and nursing care in a way that makes them promote self-esteem, empowerment, development and coping through most of their interventions. Moreover, the elderly population would benefit from an increased implication of nurses in ecological, environmental and community health promotion projects.
PubMed ID
15360183 View in PubMed
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Three nursing home residents speak about meaning at the end of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159700
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2008 Jan;15(1):97-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Lise-Lotte Dwyer
Lennart Nordenfelt
Britt-Marie Ternestedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. lise-lotte.dwyer@hi.oru.se
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2008 Jan;15(1):97-109
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Death
Female
Humans
Narration
Nursing Homes
Palliative Care
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
This article provides a deeper understanding of how meaning can be created in everyday life at a nursing home. It is based on a primary study concerning dignity involving 12 older people living in two nursing homes in Sweden. A secondary analysis was carried out on data obtained from three of the primary participants interviewed over a period of time (18-24 months), with a total of 12 interviews carried out using an inductive hermeneutic approach. The study reveals that sources of meaning were created by having a sense of: physical capability, cognitive capability, being needed, and belonging. Meaning was created through inner dialogue, communication and relationships with others. A second finding is that the experience of meaning can sometimes be hard to realize.
PubMed ID
18096585 View in PubMed
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Palliative care in heart failure: addressing the largest care gap.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137736
Source
Curr Opin Cardiol. 2011 Mar;26(2):144-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Jonathan G Howlett
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, 1403-29th Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. howlettjonathan@gmail.com
Source
Curr Opin Cardiol. 2011 Mar;26(2):144-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alberta
Caregivers - psychology
Disease Progression
Heart Failure - mortality - psychology - therapy
Humans
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Prognosis
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Heart failure is a chronic, fatally progressive and incurable condition characterized by periods of apparent stability interspersed with acute exacerbations. Treatment models have historically emphasized management of acute exacerbations of cardiovascular disease, during which end-of-life issues figure frequently and prominently, though in a setting that is inappropriate to address the comprehensive needs of patients and their families. Consequently, in comparison to patients with malignancy, heart failure patients at the end of life are less likely to access palliative resources, and more likely to access in-patient care and cardiovascular procedures.
Recent reports and position statements have emphasized the following critical needs for provision of optimal heart failure care: a) Cardiovascular specialists require training to obtain basic skills for provision of palliative care to management of end-of-life issues; b) Discussion of end-of-life issues should be introduced as early as feasible in patients with heart failure and should be updated with changes in clinical status; c) Provision of palliative care should be integrated into a team approach; d) Patients with heart failure frequently suffer symptoms which are not typically considered 'cardiovascular', such as pain, social/functional and psychological. Patients should be assessed for these symptoms, which should be treated.
This report summarizes many of these suggestions and outlines future directions for the expansion and improvement of this critical need for heart failure patients.
PubMed ID
21252651 View in PubMed
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Are existential questions the norm for terminally ill patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185943
Source
J Palliat Med. 2002 Dec;5(6):815-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002

Soft tissue massage: early intervention for relatives whose family members died in palliative cancer care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143381
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2010 Apr;19(7-8):1040-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Berit S Cronfalk
Britt-Marie Ternestedt
Peter Strang
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and The Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences and Research and Development Department, Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden. berit.cronfalk@ki.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2010 Apr;19(7-8):1040-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Bereavement
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Massage - methods
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
This paper explores how bereaved relatives experienced soft tissue massage during the first four months after the death of a family member who was in palliative cancer care.
Death of a close family member or friend is recognised as being an emotional and existential turning point in life. Previous studies emphasise need for various support strategies to assist relatives while they are grieving.
Qualitative design.
Eighteen bereaved relatives (11 women and seven men) received soft tissue massage (25 minutes, hand or foot) once a week for eight weeks. In-depth interviews were conducted after the end of the eight-week periods. Interviews were analysed using a qualitative descriptive content analysis method.
Soft tissue massage proved to be helpful and to generate feelings of consolation in the first four months of grieving. The main findings were organised into four categories: (1) a helping hand at the right time, (2) something to rely on, (3) moments of rest and (4) moments of retaining energy. The categories were then conceptualised into this theme: feelings of consolation and help in learning to restructure everyday life.
Soft tissue massage was experienced as a commendable source of consolation support during the grieving process. An assumption is that massage facilitates a transition toward rebuilding identity, but more studies in this area are needed.
Soft tissue massage appears to be a worthy, early, grieving-process support option for bereaved family members whose relatives are in palliative care.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Nurs. 2010 Apr;19(7-8):1189-9220492071
PubMed ID
20492048 View in PubMed
Less detail

Negotiating leave-taking events in the palliative medicine unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140508
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Feb;21(2):223-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Hans Hadders
Author Affiliation
Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway. hans.hadders@hist.no
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Feb;21(2):223-32
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Humans
Negotiating - psychology
Norway
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Social Identification
Social Perception
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
In this article I explore the importance staff and relatives give to patients' social identity at the time of dying, death, and leave-taking in a palliative medical unit in Norway. I employ Timmermans' concept of death brokering and show how various patient identities are used to broker and negotiate the timing, content, and form of leave-taking events. In their end-of-life care, nurses strive to accommodate relatives and support them in their grief process. Making patient identities relevant illustrates the close relationships between maintenance of the integrity of the material body and maintenance of the integrity of the social person; this practice aligns biomedical and physical identities with biographical and personal identities. Maintenance of patients' social identity is not a uniform process. Throughout postmortem care, nurses and relatives oscillate between poles of nearness to and distance from the deceased, who paradoxically can be experienced as both socially alive and socially dead.
PubMed ID
20870972 View in PubMed
Less detail

82 records – page 1 of 9.