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Development of health-related quality of life and symptoms in patients with advanced cancer in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295606
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018 May; 27(3):e12843
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
May-2018
Author
M Augustussen
M L Pedersen
L Hounsgaard
H Timm
P Sjøgren
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing and Health Science, Ilisimatusarfik, University of Greenland, Nuuk, Greenland.
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018 May; 27(3):e12843
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Greenland
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Social Adjustment
Young Adult
Abstract
A prospective national cohort study assessed the development of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and symptoms in adult patients undergoing treatment and care for advanced cancer in Greenland. HRQol was examined by EORTC QLQ-C30 version 3.0 questionnaire monthly for 4 months. Changes over time and between-group comparisons were examined. Of 58 patients included in the study, 47% completed the questionnaire four times. Functioning was generally high, and improved social functioning was observed after 1 and 2 months. The highest symptom score was for fatigue followed by pain and nausea/vomiting. A high score for financial problems remained unchanged during the entire period. Patients with higher income had reduced pain intensity (p = .03) and diarrhoea (p = .05) than patients with income below the poverty line. After 1 month, reduction in pain intensity was observed for Nuuk citizens compared with non-Nuuk citizens (p = .05). After 2 months, non-Nuuk citizens reported improved social functioning compared with Nuuk citizens (p = .05). After 3 months, Global Health in Nuuk citizens was improved compared with non-Nuuk citizens (p = .05). An important clinical finding was that patients' needs for support are related to social status, and geographical factors should be taken into account when planning palliative care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29578252 View in PubMed
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General practitioners' participation in cancer treatment in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296596
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2018 05; 18(2):4276
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
05-2018
Author
Knut Holtedahl
Benedicte I Scheel
May-Lill Johansen
Author Affiliation
UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsoe, Norway knut.holtedahl@uit.no.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2018 05; 18(2):4276
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Competence
Female
General Practitioners - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Norway
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Rural health services - organization & administration
Terminal Care - organization & administration
Waiting Lists
Young Adult
Abstract
General practitioners (GPs) participate in a patient's cancer care to different extents at different times, from prevention and diagnosis to treatment and end-of-life care. Traditionally, the GP has had a minor role in cancer treatment. However, oncological and surgical services frequently delegate limited cancer treatment tasks to GPs, especially in rural areas far from hospitals. The aim of this study was to explore the extent of GPs' participation in cancer treatment in Norway.
This study was an observational questionnaire study. In 2007, the chief municipal medical officer in all 93 municipalities in North Norway and a 25% random sample (85 municipalities) in South Norway was asked to identify up to five GPs who had recently participated in local treatment of cancer patients, and to forward a patient questionnaire to them.
Seventy-eight GPs in 49 municipalities returned completed questionnaires for 118 patients, most of them with progressive disease and living in rural areas. All the GPs reported substantial participation in therapeutic tasks for this select group of patients. Not counting palliative treatment, 64% of the GPs participated in cancer treatment either directly, or indirectly through referrals. Twenty patients received chemotherapy; they belonged to no particular diagnostic category. Eighty-eight percent of the GPs prescribed some kind of palliative medicine, such as analgesic, antiemetic, anxiolytic or antidepressant. Morphine was prescribed equally often by GPs and hospitals. Eighty-one percent of GPs reported having had a thorough conversation with the patient about the patient's condition and circumstances.
In this group of GPs, participation rates were high for most of the therapeutic and communicative tasks suggested in the questionnaire. GP participation is feasible not only in palliative care, but also in some aspects of oncological treatment and in clinical follow-up. Communication with both patient and hospital seemed good in this local setting. GPs are important helpers for some cancer patients.
PubMed ID
29788744 View in PubMed
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Trends in place of death: The role of demographic and epidemiological shifts in end-of-life care policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293080
Source
Palliat Med. 2017 Dec; 31(10):964-974
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Jorid Kalseth
Ole Magnus Theisen
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Health Research, SINTEF Technology and Society, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Palliat Med. 2017 Dec; 31(10):964-974
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Death
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Palliative Care - trends
Patient Preference
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Terminal Care - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
Surveys suggest that most people prefer to die at home. Trends in causes of mortality and age composition could limit the feasibility of home deaths.
To examine the effect of changes in decedents' age, gender and cause of death on the pattern of place of death using data on all deaths in Norway for the period 1987-2011.
Population-based observation study comparing raw, predicted, as well as standardised shares of place of death isolating the effect of demographic and epidemiological changes. The analysis was bolstered with joinpoint regression to detect shifts in trends in standardised shares.
All deaths (1,091,303) in Norway 1987-2011 by age, gender and cause of death. Place of death at home, hospital, nursing home and other.
Fewer people died in hospitals (34.1% vs 46.2%) or at home (14.2% vs 18.3%), and more in nursing homes (45.5% vs 29.5%) in 2011 than in 1987. Much of the trend can be explained by demographic and epidemiological changes. Ageing of the population and the epidemiological shift represented by the declining share of deaths from circulatory diseases (31.4% vs 48.4%) compared to the increase in deaths from neoplasms (26.9% vs 21.8%) and mental/behavioural diseases (4.4% vs 1.2%) are the strongest drivers in the shift in place of death. Joinpoint regression shows important differences between categories.
Demographic and epidemiological changes go a long way in explaining shifts in place of death. The analyses reveal substantial differences in trends between different decedent groups.
PubMed ID
28190375 View in PubMed
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