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Providing Palliative Care in a Swedish Support Home for People Who Are Homeless.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290915
Source
Qual Health Res. 2016 Jul; 26(9):1252-62
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Cecilia Håkanson
Jonas Sandberg
Mirjam Ekstedt
Elisabeth Kenne Sarenmalm
Mats Christiansen
Joakim Öhlén
Author Affiliation
Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden cecilia.hakanson@esh.se.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2016 Jul; 26(9):1252-62
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Communication
Homeless Persons
Humans
Palliative Care
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Despite high frequencies of multiple, life-limiting conditions relating to palliative care needs, people who are homeless are one of the most underserved and rarely encountered groups in palliative care settings. Instead, they often die in care places where palliative competence is not available. In this qualitative single-case study, we explored the conditions and practices of palliative care from the perspective of staff at a Swedish support home for homeless people. Interpretive description guided the research process, and data were generated from repeated reflective conversations with staff in groups, individually, and in pairs. The findings disclose a person-centered approach to palliative care, grounded in the understanding of the person's health/illness and health literacy, and how this is related to and determinant on life as a homeless individual. Four patterns shape this approach: building trustful and family-like relationships, re-dignifying the person, re-considering communication about illness and dying, and re-defining flexible and pragmatic care solutions.
PubMed ID
25994318 View in PubMed
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[The Analysis of Results of Sociological Survey Concerning Attitude to Palliative Care Support in the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297895
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2018 Jan; 26(1):32-35
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
M E Kolomiytchenko
O S Karaieva
Author Affiliation
The Federal State Budget Scientific Institution "N.A. Semashko National Research Institute of Public Health", Moscow, 105064, Russia, niiskni@mail.ru.
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2018 Jan; 26(1):32-35
Date
Jan-2018
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Humans
Palliative Care
Russia
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The palliative care is a regulatory determined form of medical care in the Russian Federation since 2011. Until now, no complex analysis was applied to problems occurring during provision of the given form of care. The actual study provides analysis of the results of questionnaire survey of population of Russia with the purpose of determining public demand in development of palliative care (level of awareness, social cultural attitudes and main needs of population). And also, concepts of effective forms of its development. The article presents and considers data obtained during the study.
PubMed ID
29968992 View in PubMed
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Palliative Care for American Indians and Alaska Natives: A Review of the Literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291497
Source
J Palliat Med. 2016 Dec; 19(12):1331-1340
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Sarah Gebauer
Sarah Knox Morley
Emily A Haozous
Esme Finlay
Chris Camarata
Bridget Fahy
Erin FitzGerald
Kimberly Harlow
Lisa Marr
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Anesthesiology, University of New Mexico , Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Source
J Palliat Med. 2016 Dec; 19(12):1331-1340
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Humans
Indians, North American
Mexico
Palliative Care
Terminal Care
Abstract
Little is known about optimal palliative and end-of-life care for American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs).
We searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane library, EBSCOhost, (PsycINFO, CINAHL Complete), and the University of New Mexico (UNM) Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center Native Health Database for search terms related to palliative care and AIs/ANs as of December 1, 2015. We included English language, peer-reviewed articles describing palliative care projects, programs, or studies in AI/AN populations or communities. We excluded case series, opinion or reflection pieces, and dissertations and articles addressing Pacific Islanders.
Our search strategy yielded 294 references, of which we included 10 publications. Study methods and outcome measures were heterogeneous, and many studies were small and/or subject to multiple biases. Common themes included the importance of culturally appropriate communication, multiple barriers to treatment, and less frequent use of advance directives than other populations.
Heterogeneity of study types, population, and small sample sizes makes it hard to draw broad conclusions regarding the best way to care for AIs/ANs. More studies are needed to assess this important topic.
PubMed ID
27828727 View in PubMed
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Danish medical schools do not meet international recommendations for teaching palliative medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297870
Source
Dan Med J. 2018 Oct; 65(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Maria Kolind Brask-Thomsen
Bodil Abild Jespersen
Mogens Grønvold
Per Sjøgren
Mette Asbjoern Neergaard
Author Affiliation
mettneer@rm.dk.
Source
Dan Med J. 2018 Oct; 65(10):
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Denmark
Education, Medical - standards
Humans
Palliative Care
Schools, Medical - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Denmark has been ranked low regarding the extent of teaching in palliative care (PC) at medical schools although the Danish Health Authority recommends that all doctors have basic knowledge of PC. The aim of this study was to investigate the contents of and time spent on teaching in PC at the four Danish medical schools and to compare results with recommendations from the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC).
Data were collected by examining university curricula, course catalogues, etc., using search words based on recommendations from the Palliative Education Assessment Tool and by a questionnaire survey among the university employees responsible for semesters or courses in Danish medical schools.
Teaching in palliative medicine at Danish medical schools is generally sparse and mainly deals with pain management and general aspects of PC. Compared to European recommendations, teaching in, e.g., ethics, spirituality, teamwork and self-reflection is lacking. Furthermore, PC training does not reach the recommended minimum of 40 hours, and examinations in PC are not held. As from the autumn of 2017, the University of Southern Denmark has offered a course that expands teaching in PC and thereby improves compliance with EAPC recommendations; the remaining three medical schools do not, to our knowledge, have any specific plans to increase the extent of teaching activities in palliative medicine.
Teaching in palliative medicine is sparse at all four medical schools in Denmark and should be strengthened to meet Danish as well as European recommendations.
No funding was used for this study.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
30269748 View in PubMed
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Developing palliative care programs in Indigenous communities using participatory action research: a Canadian application of the public health approach to palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295136
Source
Ann Palliat Med. 2018 Apr; 7(Suppl 2):S52-S72
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Mary Lou Kelley
Holly Prince
Shevaun Nadin
Kevin Brazil
Maxine Crow
Gaye Hanson
Luanne Maki
Lori Monture
Christopher J Mushquash
Valerie O'Brien
Jeroline Smith
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, Centre for Education and Research on Aging & Health, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. mlkelley@lakeheadu.ca.
Source
Ann Palliat Med. 2018 Apr; 7(Suppl 2):S52-S72
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Public Health
Abstract
The Indigenous people of Canada include First Nations, Inuit and Metis. This research focused on four diverse First Nations communities located in Ontario and Manitoba. First Nations communities have well-established culturally-based social processes for supporting their community members experiencing dying, loss, grief and bereavement. However, communities do not have formalized local palliative care (PC) programs and have limited access to medical services, especially pain and symptom management.
Researchers conducted participatory action research (PAR) in partnership with four First Nations communities to create local PC programs. A conceptual framework for community capacity development (Kelley model) and an integrative framework for PC research with First Nations communities guided the research over 6 years. Based on a community assessment, Elders and Knowledge Carriers, community leaders and First Nations health care providers created PC programs grounded in the unique social, spiritual and cultural practices of each community, and integrated them into local health services. Maintaining local control, community members engaged external health care organizations to address gaps in health services. Strategies such as journey mapping clarified roles and strengthened partnerships between community and external health care providers. Finally, community members advocated for needed funding, medication and equipment to provide palliative home care. The research team provided mentorship, facilitation, support, education and resources to the community leaders and documented and evaluated their capacity development process.
Our findings contribute to PC practice, policy and research. Four unique PC programs were created that offered First Nations people the choice to receive PC at home, supported by family, community and culture. A workbook of culturally relevant resources was developed for use by interested First Nations communities across Canada, including resources for program development, direct care, education, and engaging external partners. Policy recommendations and a policy framework to guide PC program development in First Nations communities were created. All research outcomes were published on a website and disseminated nationally and internationally. Our work also contributes to furthering discussions of research methods that can advance public health and PC initiatives. We demonstrated the achievements of PAR methods in strengthening community action, developing the personal skills of community health care providers and creating more supportive environments for First Nations people who wish to die at home. The Kelley model was adapted for use by First Nations communities. We also identified keys to success for capacity development.
This research provides a Canadian example of implementing a public health approach to PC in an Indigenous context using PAR. It provides evidence of the effectiveness of a community capacity development as a strategy and illustrates how to implement it. This approach, fully grounded in local culture and context, has potential to be adapted to Indigenous communities elsewhere in Canada and internationally.
PubMed ID
29764173 View in PubMed
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Public awareness of palliative care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292197
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Jun; 46(4):478-487
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Caroline Westerlund
Carol Tishelman
Inger Benkel
Carl Johan Fürst
Ulla Molander
Birgit H Rasmussen
Sylvia Sauter
Olav Lindqvist
Author Affiliation
1 Geriatrik Department, Jakobsbergs Hospital, Järfälla, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Jun; 46(4):478-487
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the awareness of palliative care (PC) in a general Swedish population.
We developed an e-survey based on a similar study conducted in Northern Ireland, consisting of 10 questions. Closed questions were primarily analyzed using descriptive statistics. Open questions were subject to inductive qualitative analysis.
The study utilized a population sample of 7684 persons aged 18-66, of which 2020 responded, stratified by gender, age and region.
Most participants reported 'no' ( n = 827, 41%) or 'some' ( n = 863, 43%) awareness of PC. Being female or older were associated with higher levels of awareness, as was a university-level education, working in a healthcare setting and having a friend or family member receiving PC. Most common sources of knowledge were the media, close friends and relatives receiving PC, as well as working in a healthcare setting. Aims of PC were most frequently identified as 'care before death', 'pain relief', 'dignity' and a 'peaceful death'. The preferred place of care and death was one's own home. The main barriers to raising awareness about PC were fear, shame and taboo, along with perceived lack of information and/or personal relevance. The term 'palliative care' was said to be unfamiliar by many. A number of strategies to enhance awareness and access to PC were suggested, largely reflecting the previously identified barriers.
This survey found limited awareness of palliative care in an adult sample of the Swedish general public = 66 years, and points to a more widespread disempowerment surrounding end-of-life issues.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29301481 View in PubMed
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End-of-life palliative oral care in Norwegian health institutions. An exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291501
Source
Gerodontology. 2016 Dec; 33(4):522-529
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Siri F Kvalheim
Gunhild V Strand
Bettina S Husebø
Mihaela C Marthinussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Siri.Kvalheim@ok.uib.no.
Source
Gerodontology. 2016 Dec; 33(4):522-529
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Palliative Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To explore circumstances surrounding procedures and knowledge regarding oral care for terminal patients in Norwegian healthcare institutions.
A questionnaire was distributed to randomly selected hospitals (n = 19) and nursing homes (n = 57) in central and rural parts of Norway. The questionnaire included three closed-ended and three open-ended questions about oral care for terminal patients. If procedures existed, the respondents were asked to enclose or describe them.
The response rate was 84% for hospitals and 79% for nursing homes. Of the responding institutions, 25% had no oral care procedures, nor did 48% recognise their importance. Insufficient knowledge about oral care was reported by 39%. Twenty-one different procedures were identified, and a great number of oral care products used. The most common was glycerol, used by 36% of the institutions. Only 2% used a concentration below 30% - the limit above which the glycerol has a desiccating rather than a moistening effect. The most common patient complaint was dry mouth (49%), followed by plaque, food particles and fungus infections, each experienced by 19%. The most common problem for the personnel was lack of knowledge (43%) and patient cooperation (38%).
Some terminal patients do not receive adequate palliative oral care in Norwegian healthcare institutions. Those that do are exposed to a great number of undocumented procedures and sometimes harmful products. There is a need for evidence-based procedures for oral care for terminally ill patients in health institutions, establishing interprofessional palliative healthcare teams and in particular improved training of the nursing staff.
PubMed ID
25951418 View in PubMed
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Bridging gaps in everyday life - a free-listing approach to explore the variety of activities performed by physiotherapists in specialized palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295174
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2018 Jan 29; 17(1):20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-29-2018
Author
U Olsson Möller
K Stigmar
I Beck
M Malmström
B H Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Institute for Palliative Care, Lund University and Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden. ulrika.olsson_moller@med.lu.se.
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2018 Jan 29; 17(1):20
Date
Jan-29-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - manpower - methods
Physical Therapists - standards - trends
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
A growing body of studies indicate benefits of physiotherapy for patients in palliative care, for symptom relief and wellbeing. Though physiotherapists are increasingly acknowledged as important members of palliative care teams, they are still an underutilized source and not fully recognized. The aim of this study was to explore the variety of activities described by physiotherapists in addressing the needs and problems of patients and their families in specialized palliative care settings.
Using a free-listing approach, ten physiotherapists working in eight specialized palliative care settings in Sweden described as precisely and in as much detail as possible different activities in which patients and their families were included (directly or indirectly) during 10 days. The statements were entered into NVivo and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Statements containing more than one activity were categorized per activity.
In total, 264 statements, containing 504 varied activities, were coded into seven categories: Counteracting a declining physical function; Informing, guiding and educating; Observing, assessing and evaluating; Attending to signs and symptoms; Listening, talking with and understanding; Caring for basic needs; and Organizing, planning and coordinating. In practice, however, the activities were intrinsically interwoven. The activities showed how physiotherapists aimed, through care for the body, to address patients' physical, psychological, social and existential needs, counteracting the decline in a patient's physical function and wellbeing. The activities also revealed a great variation, in relation not only to what they did, but also to their holistic and inseparable nature with regard to why, how, when, where, with whom and for whom the activities were carried out, which points towards a well-adopted person-centred palliative care approach.
The study provides hands-on descriptions of how person-centred palliative care is integrated in physiotherapists' everyday activities. Physiotherapists in specialized palliative care help patients and families to bridge the gap between their real and ideal everyday life with the aim to maximize security, autonomy and wellbeing. The concrete examples included can be used in understanding the contribution of physiotherapists to the palliative care team and inform future research interventions and outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29378566 View in PubMed
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Implementation of knowledge-based palliative care in nursing homes and pre-post post evaluation by cross-over design: a study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295158
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2018 Mar 22; 17(1):52
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Date
Mar-22-2018
Author
Gerd Ahlström
Per Nilsen
Eva Benzein
Lina Behm
Birgitta Wallerstedt
Magnus Persson
Anna Sandgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, PO Box 157, SE-221 00, Lund, Sweden. gerd.ahlstrom@med.lu.se.
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2018 Mar 22; 17(1):52
Date
Mar-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Keywords
Aging
Cross-Over Studies
Education, Nursing, Continuing - methods - standards
Humans
Nursing Homes - manpower - organization & administration
Palliative Care - methods - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation - methods
Sweden
Abstract
The demography of the world is changing as the population is ageing. Because of this change to a higher proportion of older people, the WHO has called for improved palliative care for older persons. A large number of all deaths in the industrialised world occur while older people are living in nursing homes and therefore a key question becomes how the principles of palliative care can be implemented in that context. The aims of this study are: a) to describe a model of an educational intervention with the goal of implementing knowledge-based palliative care in nursing homes, and b) to describe the design of the evaluation of the effectiveness regarding the implementation of knowledge-based palliative care.
A complex intervention is evaluated by means of a cross-over design. An educational intervention concerning palliative care consisting of five seminars during 6 months for staff and managers has been developed and conducted in 20 nursing homes in two counties. Before the intervention started, the feasibility was tested in a pilot study conducted in nursing homes not included in the main study. The intervention is evaluated through a non-randomized experimental design with intervention and control groups and pre- and post-assessments. The evaluation includes older persons living in nursing homes, next-of-kin, staff and managers. Data collection consists of quantitative methods such as questionnaires and register data and qualitative methods in the form of individual interviews, focus-group interviews and participant observations.
The research will contribute to new knowledge about how to implement knowledge-based palliative care in a nursing home setting. A strength of this project is that the Medical Research Council framework of complex intervention is applied. The four recommended stages, Development, Feasibility and piloting, Evaluation and Implementation, are combined for the educational intervention, which functions as a strategy to achieve knowledge-based palliative care in the nursing homes. Implementation is always a question of change and a good theoretical understanding is needed for drawing valid conclusions about the causal mechanisms of change. The topic is highly relevant considering the world's ageing population. The data collection is completed and the analysis is ongoing.
NCT02708498 .
Notes
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PubMed ID
29566688 View in PubMed
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Development of health-related quality of life and symptoms in patients with advanced cancer in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295606
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018 May; 27(3):e12843
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
May-2018
Author
M Augustussen
M L Pedersen
L Hounsgaard
H Timm
P Sjøgren
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing and Health Science, Ilisimatusarfik, University of Greenland, Nuuk, Greenland.
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018 May; 27(3):e12843
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Greenland
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Social Adjustment
Young Adult
Abstract
A prospective national cohort study assessed the development of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and symptoms in adult patients undergoing treatment and care for advanced cancer in Greenland. HRQol was examined by EORTC QLQ-C30 version 3.0 questionnaire monthly for 4 months. Changes over time and between-group comparisons were examined. Of 58 patients included in the study, 47% completed the questionnaire four times. Functioning was generally high, and improved social functioning was observed after 1 and 2 months. The highest symptom score was for fatigue followed by pain and nausea/vomiting. A high score for financial problems remained unchanged during the entire period. Patients with higher income had reduced pain intensity (p = .03) and diarrhoea (p = .05) than patients with income below the poverty line. After 1 month, reduction in pain intensity was observed for Nuuk citizens compared with non-Nuuk citizens (p = .05). After 2 months, non-Nuuk citizens reported improved social functioning compared with Nuuk citizens (p = .05). After 3 months, Global Health in Nuuk citizens was improved compared with non-Nuuk citizens (p = .05). An important clinical finding was that patients' needs for support are related to social status, and geographical factors should be taken into account when planning palliative care.
Notes
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