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Abstracts of the 5th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC). Trondheim, Norway. May 28-31, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156255
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22(4):397-558
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22(4):397-558
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
PubMed ID
18613345 View in PubMed
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Abstracts of the 5th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC). May 28-31, 2008. Trondheim, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154991
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22 Suppl 1:399-558
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Source
Palliat Med. 2008 Jun;22 Suppl 1:399-558
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
PubMed ID
18599557 View in PubMed
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The 5th Nordic Congress on care of the terminally ill held in Reykjavík 5-7 June 1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203037
Source
Acta Oncol. 1998;37(7-8):741-2
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1998
Author
V. Sigurdardóttir
Author Affiliation
The Icelandic Cancer Society, Reykjavík. valgerdur@krabb.is
Source
Acta Oncol. 1998;37(7-8):741-2
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Iceland
Palliative Care
Terminally ill
PubMed ID
10050996 View in PubMed
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Consensus recommendations for the management of constipation in patients with advanced, progressive illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139325
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2010 Nov;40(5):761-73
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
S Lawrence Librach
Maryse Bouvette
Carlo De Angelis
Justine Farley
Doreen Oneschuk
José Luis Pereira
Ann Syme
Author Affiliation
Division of Palliative Care, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. larry.librach@utoronto.ca
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2010 Nov;40(5):761-73
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada
Constipation - drug therapy - etiology
Humans
Palliative Care - methods
Abstract
Constipation is a highly prevalent and distressing symptom in patients with advanced, progressive illnesses. Although opioids are one of the most common causes of constipation in patients with advanced, progressive illness, it is important to note that there are many other potential etiologies and combinations of causes that should be taken into consideration when making treatment decisions. Management approaches involve a combination of good assessment techniques, preventive regimens, appropriate pharmacological treatment of established constipation, and frequent monitoring. In this vulnerable patient population, maintenance of comfort and respect for individual preferences and sensitivities should be overriding considerations when making clinical decisions. This consensus document was developed by a multidisciplinary group of leading Canadian palliative care specialists in an effort to define best practices in palliative constipation management that will be relevant and useful to health care professionals. Although a wide range of options exists to help treat constipation and prevent its development or recurrence, there is a limited body of evidence evaluating pharmacological interventions. These recommendations are, therefore, based on the best of the available evidence, combined with expert opinion derived from experience in clinical practice. This underscores the need for further clinical evaluation of the available agents to create a robust, evidence-based foundation for treatment decisions in the management of constipation in patients with advanced, progressive illness.
PubMed ID
21075273 View in PubMed
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Transition to end of life care: The Inuit experience in Montreal

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96095
Source
Page 494 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
focused on the needs of the Inuit admitted to an urban hospital during the transition from curative to palliative care. This is a multiphase nursing project having as goal to increase the quality of life of the Inuit patient in transition to palliative care in an urban medical center. It includes a
  1 document  
Author
Robitaille, A.
Kelly, M.L.
Young, B.
Author Affiliation
Nunavik Centre
Innulitsivik Health Centre
McGill University Health Centre
Ungava Tullatavik Health Centre
Source
Page 494 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
End of life care
Hospital environment
Inuit
Nunavik
Palliative Care
Quebec
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 12. Primary Care, Service Delivery, Health Promotion and E-Health.
Documents
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Traditional Healing among the Inupiaq: Importance of Caring for the Body, Mind, and Spirit

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288560
Source
2nd International Telehealth Symposium on Palliative Care, Anchorage, Alaska. 14 slides.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
27 April 2010
Symposium on Palliative Care Anchorage, Alaska BACKGROUND  Surveys indicate that the vast majority, upwards of 90%, of people believe in some divine spirit.  The most used common form of Complementary and Alternative Medicine is prayer.  “This is the greatest error in the treatment of illness
  1 document  
Author
Hild, Carl M.
Author Affiliation
Associate Professor, Director, Health Services Administration Program, Business Administration Department, Alaska Pacific University
Source
2nd International Telehealth Symposium on Palliative Care, Anchorage, Alaska. 14 slides.
Date
27 April 2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
PowerPoint (.ppt)
File Size
358071
Keywords
Indigenous Collections
Health & Wellness
Our Stories
Alaska
Palliative Care
Telemedicine
Patient Comfort
Documents

Hild_TraditionalHealingPowerpoint.pdf

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[ICN Congress--the dying need good care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207708
Source
Vardfacket. 1997 Aug 11;21(7):23
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-11-1997

Death & dying: Perspectives of a First Nations community in the Northwest Territories

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96160
Source
Page 497 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
customs, the importance of traditional food, the value of traditional medicine. Further, culturally relevant end of life care services needs to be developed, as the Gwich'in preferred place of death is at home. Health and Social Services professionals who work in the realm of palliative care should
  1 document  
Author
Blake, R.A.
Author Affiliation
University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan
Source
Page 497 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Contemporary perspectives and practices
Cross cultural training and education
Death and dying
End of life care services
Fort McPherson
Gwich'in
Historical perspectives and practices
Palliative Care
Resilience
Traditional knowledge
Traditional values and customs
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 12. Primary Care, Service Delivery, Health Promotion and E-Health.
Documents
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Best interests at end of life: an updated review of decisions made by the Consent and Capacity Board of Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118233
Source
J Crit Care. 2013 Feb;28(1):22-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Paula Chidwick
Robert Sibbald
Laura Hawryluck
Author Affiliation
William Osler Health System, London Health Sciences Centre, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, University Health Network, University of Toronto. Paula.chidwick@williamoslerhs.ca
Source
J Crit Care. 2013 Feb;28(1):22-7
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Beneficence
Decision Making
Dissent and Disputes - legislation & jurisprudence
Governing Board
Humans
Negotiating
Ontario
Palliative Care - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Physician's Practice Patterns - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Terminal Care - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Third-Party Consent - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Withholding Treatment - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
To increase our understanding of the notion of "best interests" in end of life disagreements through an updated review of decisions made by the Consent and Capacity Board of Ontario. There was a significant increase (235%) in decisions from this tribunal between 2009 and 2011. "Best interests" test is used when no prior expressed wishes are known to the surrogate decision-makers.
Purposively sampled written decisions of the Consent and Capacity Board of Ontario between 2003 and 2011 that focused on the "best interests" of patients at the end of life. Interpretive content analysis was performed independently by 3 reviewers, and themes were identified by consensus.
We found substitute decision makers (SDMs) rely on an appeal to their own values or religion in their interpretation of best interests; physicians rely on clinical conditions; board emphasizes alignment with Health Care Consent Act. In the more recent cases, we found that SDMs report that patients value suffering; that SDMs have unrealistic hope for recovery and can communicate and get direction from the incapable patient; that SDMs need education on their role and responsibility as SDM; and that SDMs need time to provide consent, and that most proposed treatment plans that were sources of conflict included "palliative care."
Several lessons are drawn for the benefit of health care teams engaged in disagreements at end of life with SDMs over the best interests of patients.
PubMed ID
23228726 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.