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Stressors experienced by nurses providing end-of-life palliative care in the intensive care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123646
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Mar;44(1):18-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Céline Gélinas
Lise Fillion
Marie-Anik Robitaille
Manon Truchon
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Mar;44(1):18-39
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Focus Groups
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Palliative Care
Quebec
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe stressors experienced by nurses in providing end-of-life palliative care (EoL/PC) in intensive care units (ICUs). A descriptive qualitative design was used. A total of 42 nurses from 5 ICUs in the province of Quebec, Canada, participated in 10 focus groups. Stressors were found to be clustered in 3 categories: organizational, professional, and emotional. The major organizational stressors were lack of a palliative care approach, interprofessional difficulty, lack of continuity in life-support and treatment plans, and conflicting demands. Professional stressors included lack of EoL/PC competencies and difficulty communicating with families and collaborating with the medical team. Emotional stressors were described as value conflicts, lack of emotional support, and dealing with patient and family suffering.The authors conclude that providing EoL/PC is stressful for ICU nurses and that education and support programs should be developed to ensure quality EoL/PC in the critical care environment.
PubMed ID
22679843 View in PubMed
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[Loan of services developing palliative care skills based on the apprentice model].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152204
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2008 Sep-Oct;5(7):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Clémence Dallaire
Geneviève Audet
Michel L'Heureux
Louise Saint-Laurent
Lise Fillion
Diane Morin
Nathalie Dubé
Author Affiliation
Faculté des sciences infirmières de l'Université Laval.
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2008 Sep-Oct;5(7):13-9
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allied Health Personnel - education
Education, Nursing
Humans
Inservice training
Nursing Care - standards
Palliative Care - standards
Quebec
Abstract
For over 25 years, the Maison Michel-Sarrazin, a private palliative care institution in the Quebec City region, has had an original agreement with other establishments in the healthcare network (hospitals, long-term residential centres and CLSCs), in the form of the loan of nursing services. Based on the findings of a study as part of a research program, this article describes the loan of nursing services and qualitatively assesses its effects on the development of nurses' palliative care skills. An evaluative descriptive approach based on two conceptual frameworks (Giddens; Patton) was used to compile the views of 79 players. The findings demonstrate the innovative nature of the loan of nursing services and its considerable influence on the development of nursing skills, thanks to training based on the apprenticeship model (learning through observation and imitation), and on nursing practice at the Maison Michel-Sarrazin. Nevertheless, the controversy surrounding training using the apprenticeship model and the lack of recognition of this training on the part of the lending institutions raise questions despite the general satisfaction with the loan of nursing services.
PubMed ID
19266788 View in PubMed
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Educational needs of palliative care nurses in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174781
Source
J Palliat Care. 2005;21(1):12-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Lise Fillion
Martine Fortier
Richard L Goupil
Author Affiliation
Laval University, Faculty of Nursing, and Laval University Cancer Research Centre, CHUQ, Quebec, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2005;21(1):12-8
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Female
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Nurses - psychology
Palliative Care
Quebec
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Abstract
Education appears to be a useful strategy for improving quality of care and work-related stress management. The present study assesses the educational needs of palliative care nurses working in acute care hospitals (n=88) and CLSCs (Centre Local de Services Communautaires, home-based, n=109) of the larger Quebec City area. It also describes relationships between educational needs, psychological distress, and self-efficacy. Nurses were surveyed and compared on training needs, preferred learning format, as well as barriers and factors facilitating attendance to workshops. Similar educational needs were observed in both work settings. Crisis, stress, and emotion management were rated as the most useful topics, followed by nonpharmacological ways to manage pain. Preferred educational formats were lectures and group discussions. Attending free training sessions during work hours was described as the best way to promote participation. Educational needs were positively related to psychological distress, and negatively related to perceived self-efficacy in providing good palliative care.
PubMed ID
15895545 View in PubMed
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The "good" rural death: a report of an ethnographic study in Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150945
Source
J Palliat Care. 2009;25(1):21-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Donna M Wilson
Lise Fillion
Roger Thomas
Christopher Justice
Paramjit P Bhardwaj
Anne-Marie Veillette
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2009;25(1):21-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Death
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Palliative Care
Patient satisfaction
Rural Health Services
Social Support
Terminal Care
Abstract
Much concern has centred on the "good" death since the modern hospice/palliative care movement began, and considerable progress has been made in urban services to promote the good death. Little is known about the perspectives of people who live in rural and remote areas of Canada on the good death and how this good death might be enabled in those areas. This report is of an ethnographic study in rural Alberta involving English-speaking Albertans. An identical study in Quebec will be reported elsewhere. The 2006-07 Alberta study involved 13 interviews with individuals to understand their personal viewpoints or perspectives and how they were shaped by their experiences, followed by focus group discussions in two representative rural communities for additional insights from rural policy-makers and care providers. Four themes in the Alberta data highlight critical elements of the good rural death. These findings are expected to contribute to rural/remote palliative and end-of-life care developments.
PubMed ID
19445339 View in PubMed
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Coping strategies, emotional outcomes and spiritual quality of life in palliative care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161417
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 Jun;13(6):291-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Jean-Francois Desbiens
Lise Fillion
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Laval University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 Jun;13(6):291-300
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Bereavement
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control
Emotions
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff - psychology
Palliative Care
Quality of Life
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Social Support
Spirituality
Abstract
It is in accompanying the dying that palliative care nurses say they find meaning in their work. To further explore this phenomenon, consideration of coping strategies is proposed. The main objective of this correlational study was to describe the association between coping strategies (using a revised version of the COPE scale (Carver et al, 1999)), emotional outcomes (distress and vigour; profile of mood states (POMS)), and spiritual quality of life (using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Spiritual Wellbeing Scale (FACIT-sp)). A sample of 120 nurses providing palliative care in acute care hospitals and the community in Quebec was included. Positive reinterpretation (beta=.27; p
PubMed ID
17851385 View in PubMed
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Impact of a meaning-centered intervention on job satisfaction and on quality of life among palliative care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152998
Source
Psychooncology. 2009 Dec;18(12):1300-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Lise Fillion
Stéphane Duval
Serge Dumont
Pierre Gagnon
Isabelle Tremblay
Isabelle Bairati
William S Breitbart
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Laval University, Quebec G1V 0A6, Canada. lise.fillion@fsi.ulaval.ca
Source
Psychooncology. 2009 Dec;18(12):1300-10
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Burnout, Professional - psychology - therapy
Emotions
Existentialism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Oncology Nursing
Palliative Care - psychology
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Spirituality
Stress Disorders, Traumatic - psychology - therapy
Abstract
Palliative care (PC) nurses experience several recurrent organizational, professional, and individual challenges. To address existential and emotional demands, the meaning-centered intervention was recently developed. The intervention applied didactic and process-oriented strategies, including guided reflections, experiential exercises, and education based on themes of Viktor Frankl's logotherapy. The objective of this study was to test its efficiency to improve job satisfaction and quality of life in PC nurses from three regional districts in Quebec Province, Canada.
A randomized waiting-list group design was conducted, intervention group (n=56) versus waiting-list group (n=53). Job satisfaction, perception of benefits of working in PC, and spiritual and emotional quality of life were measured at pre-, posttest, and 3-month follow-up.
The PC nurses in the experimental group reported more perceived benefits of working in PC after the intervention and at follow-up. Spiritual and emotional quality of life remained, however, unaffected by the intervention.
To explain null findings, theoretical and methodological challenges, related to existential interventions, such as choice of outcomes, and selection bias (participants recruited were healthy workers) are discussed. Future directions and strategies to deal with those issues are proposed.
PubMed ID
19165757 View in PubMed
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A new tool to assess family caregivers' burden during end-of-life care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154598
Source
J Palliat Care. 2008;24(3):151-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Serge Dumont
Lise Fillion
Pierre Gagnon
Nadine Bernier
Author Affiliation
Ecole de service social, Université Laval, I Québec, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2008;24(3):151-61
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - organization & administration - psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Female
Home Nursing - organization & administration - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Assessment - organization & administration
Palliative Care - organization & administration - psychology
Principal Component Analysis
Psychometrics
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires - standards
Self Efficacy
Sensitivity and specificity
Social Support
Abstract
A significant challenge in virtually all caregiving studies is the measurement of burden, particularly within the specific context of palliative care. Existing tools in the caregiving field are not specifically designed for palliative care. A new tool, which specifically assesses family caregivers' (FC) burden within the palliative care context, was systematically developed and validated. This paper describes the steps taken to develop this tool and to examine its psychometric properties. The Caregiver's Burden Scale in End-of-Life Care (CBS-EOLC) is a 16-item self-report questionnaire. Internal consistency reliability: Cronbach's alpha = 0.95. Construct validity: Most inter-item associations were consistent with the conceptual framework that emerged from qualitative data analyses. Convergent validity: Interscale correlations: a) Zarit's Burden Interview (BI) = 0.72 (p
PubMed ID
18942565 View in PubMed
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The benefits of a palliative care network: a case study in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163165
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 Apr;13(4):190-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Diane Morin
Louise Saint-Laurent
Marie-Pier Bresse
Clemence Dallaire
Lise Fillion
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing Sciences, Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada. diane.morin@fsi.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 Apr;13(4):190-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Community Networks - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care
Cooperative Behavior
Family - psychology
Health Facility Administrators - psychology
Health Services Accessibility
Home Care Services
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Medical Oncology - organization & administration
Medical Staff - psychology
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Oncology Nursing - organization & administration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
This article aims to present the beneficial effects associated with the local implementation of an integrated network in palliative care, as perceived by diverse constituency groups. A case study was conducted in the province of Quebec, Canada, using individual (n=16) and group (n=16) interviews, with a total of 106 participants (i.e. managers and formal and informal caregivers). From a content analysis, two categories of beneficial effects emerged: those associated with professional practice and those with patient services. The most important effects of this organisational initiative were found to be the recognition of the palliative care domain necessitating specialized competencies, an improved interdisciplinary collaboration, and more efficient circulation of information between care settings, as well as improved accessibility, continuity and quality of care and services to patients at the end of life.
PubMed ID
17551423 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.