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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Taking an "upstream" approach in the care of dying cancer patients: the case for a palliative approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256689
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2014;24(3):144-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kelli I Stajduhar
Carolyn Tayler
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2014;24(3):144-53
Date
2014
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Leadership
Neoplasms - nursing - therapy
Oncology Nursing
Palliative Care
Abstract
Advances in technology and drug therapy have resulted in cancer patients living longer with malignant disease. However, most of these patients will face the end of life much sooner than the general population. Adopting a "palliative approach" is one innovation that has the potential to promote anticipatory planning and promote enhanced end-of-life care. Yet, in much of the western world, this upstream orientation has rarely been achieved. An emphasis on providing palliative care late in the illness trajectory has resulted in many challenges for the care of people with advanced cancer. We highlight a nursing research initiative, The Initiative for a Palliative Approach in Nursing: Evidence and Leadership (iPANEL), that aims to develop evidence to inform the integration of a palliative approach into the care of people with advancing chronic life-limiting conditions. Oncology nurses have an important role to play in facilitating a palliative approach, transforming the ways in which cancer patients are cared for within our health care system.
PubMed ID
25189052 View in PubMed
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Defining and measuring a palliative approach in primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106146
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Nov;59(11):1149-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Joshua D Shadd
Fred Burge
Kelli I Stajduhar
S Robin Cohen
Mary Lou Kelley
Barbara Pesut
Author Affiliation
Centre for Studies in Family Medicine, Western Centre for Public Health and Family Medicine, London, ON N6A 3K7. joshua.shadd@schulich.uwo.ca.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Nov;59(11):1149-50
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Palliative Care - methods - organization & administration
Primary Health Care - methods - organization & administration
Notes
Cites: J Palliat Care. 2006 Summer;22(2):115-617265665
Cites: Palliat Med. 2002 Nov;16(6):457-6412465692
Cites: CMAJ. 2012 Sep 4;184(12):E643-422847965
Cites: Palliat Med. 2007 Jul;21(5):409-1517901100
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2001 Oct;47:2009-12, 2015-611723595
PubMed ID
24235182 View in PubMed
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Using quality improvement to enhance research readiness in palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167676
Source
J Healthc Qual. 2006 Jul-Aug;28(4):22-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kelli I Stajduhar
Darcee Bidgood
Leah Norgrove
Diane Allan
Shelly Waskiewich
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Center on Aging, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. kis@uvic.ca
Source
J Healthc Qual. 2006 Jul-Aug;28(4):22-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Health facilities
Health Services Research
Humans
Palliative Care - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Abstract
Quality improvement is an essential feature of the ongoing development of palliative care programs. Little has been written, however, about using quality improvement as a strategy to introduce research concepts to staff and administrators for the purpose of enhancing research readiness in healthcare settings. This article describes such an endeavor. The authors discuss two quality improvement initiatives undertaken by a palliative care program in Canada. These two examples demonstrate how the quality improvement process acted as a catalyst to enhance research readiness.
PubMed ID
16944649 View in PubMed
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Core aspects of "empowering" caregivers as articulated by leaders in home health care: palliative and chronic illness contexts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130701
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Sep;43(3):78-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Kelli I Stajduhar
Laura Funk
Faye Wolse
Valorie Crooks
Della Roberts
Allison M Williams
Denise Cloutier-Fisher
Barbara McLeod
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Sep;43(3):78-94
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Caregivers - psychology
Chronic Disease
Family
Home Care Services - manpower
Humans
Leadership
Palliative Care
Power (Psychology)
Self Care
Abstract
Home-based family caregivers are often assisted by home care services founded upon principles of health promotion, such as empowerment. Using an interpretive approach and in-depth qualitative interviews, the authors examine descriptions of family empowerment by leaders and managers in the field of home health care in the province of British Columbia, Canada. In a culture of fiscal restraint, dying at home, and self-care, participants described how home care nurses empower family caregivers to meet these objectives. This involves educating and informing caregivers, engaging them in planning and decision-making, and reassuring them that their role is manageable and worthwhile. Though some participants viewed providing supports as empowering (e.g., during times of crisis), others viewed them as disempowering (by promoting dependence). Empowered caregivers were characterized as able to provide home care, confident of their capabilities, and believing that their work is positive and beneficial. The long-term goal of empowerment was characterized as client self-care and/or family care and decreased dependence on formal services.
PubMed ID
21977727 View in PubMed
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Use of palliative care services in a semirural program in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153137
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Diane E Allan
Shelly Waskiewich
Kelli I Stajduhar
Darcee Bidgood
Author Affiliation
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(1):10-5
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Female
Hospital Units
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - utilization
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Rural Health Services - utilization
Rural Population
Abstract
Although specialized palliative care services in rural areas are scarce, many people who are dying, and their families, want to remain in their homes or within their own community. As such, semirural communities across Canada have developed a variety of initiatives to address this need. The purpose of our paper is to describe a semirural palliative care program located in British Columbia.
We used univariate and bivariate analyses to examine all patients for whom a palliative care bed was requested in the Saanich Peninsula Hospital Palliative Care Unit (PCU) between Jan. 1, 2005, and Dec. 31, 2006.
Data suggest that there is provision of care for local residents in this semirural community. Throughout 2005 and 2006, SPH received a total of 411 requests for a palliative care bed with about three-quarters of admissions coming from other units within the hospital and from local residents.
Use of services data collected from hospital charts can provide valuable information to help inform program and policy decision-makers. Yet such information is limited in relation to answering the question of whether the end-of-life needs of local residents are being met. Future studies should consider input from families and patients to enhance our understanding of the role of a PCU in a semirural environment.
PubMed ID
19146786 View in PubMed
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An exploration of empowerment discourse within home-care nurses' accounts of practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137457
Source
Nurs Inq. 2011 Mar;18(1):66-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Laura M Funk
Kelli I Stajduhar
Mary Ellen Purkis
Author Affiliation
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. lmfunk@uvic.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2011 Mar;18(1):66-76
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Family Relations
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Home Nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Palliative Care - methods
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Marketing
Abstract
In this study, we explore how client and family caregiver 'empowerment' is interpreted by home-care nurses talking about their practice with palliative (and to a lesser extent, non-palliative) clients and families. We draw on secondary analysis of qualitative data collected through in-person interviews with 27 home-care nurses from a western Canadian health authority. First, we illustrate how the practice ideal of empowerment, in the sense of 'respecting autonomy and choices', can be understood as reflecting home-care nurses' needs to mitigate the emotional impact of feeling unable to effectively help palliative clients/families. Then, we illustrate how the practice ideal of empowerment, in the sense of 'promoting independence', can be understood to accomplish the need to shift responsibility for particular care tasks to clients and family members. Lastly, home-care nurses, talk about 'promoting choices' is also investigated. 'Choice' was framed narrowly with respect to allowing palliative clients and families to determine visit time and frequency. Findings are discussed in relation to the concept of 'responsibilization'.
PubMed ID
21281397 View in PubMed
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Bereaved family members' assessments of the quality of end-of-life care: what is important?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126627
Source
J Palliat Care. 2011;27(4):261-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kelli I Stajduhar
Laura Funk
S Robin Cohen
Allison Williams
Darcee Bidgood
Diane Allan
Leah Norgrove
Daren Heyland
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, PO Box 1700 STN CSC, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada VBW 2Y2. kis@uvic.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2011;27(4):261-9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bereavement
Canada
Consumer Satisfaction
Decision Making
Family
Female
Health Facility Environment
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Terminal Care
Abstract
Families of patients are well poised to comment on the end-of-life (EOL) care received by those patients and can provide feedback to care providers and decision makers. To better understand family-member evaluations of the quality of in-patient EOL care, this study draws on qualitative interview data (n = 24) to identify core aspects of EOL care that are important for family members. Based on this analysis, a conceptual framework of family members' assessments of their experiences with EOL health care services is developed. Findings suggest the need to distinguish between perceived substantive or tangible features of received care, interpretations of the causes and symbolic meanings of that care, and personal and affective outcomes. Practitioners are encouraged to reflect on how behaviours and communications may be interpreted by families. Attention also needs to be given to the changes in practice and organizational decision making that can facilitate more positive experiences for families and patients.
PubMed ID
22372280 View in PubMed
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Situated/being situated: Client and co-worker roles of family caregivers in hospice palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154700
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1789-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Kelli I Stajduhar
Dawn D Nickel
Wanda L Martin
Laura Funk
Author Affiliation
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, BC, Canada. kis@uvic.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1789-97
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Canada
Caregivers
Cohort Studies
Female
Home Care Services
Hospice Care
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Social Support
Abstract
Since the inception of the modern hospice movement, the patient and family caregiver (FCG) have been considered the unit of care; family members are identified as 'clients' within palliative care philosophy. Little research has focused on how FCGs define their roles within the hospice palliative care (HPC) system. The aim of this study was to describe how FCGs of dying cancer patients view their roles in relation to the HPC system. Secondary analysis of interviews with 36 bereaved FCGs in Western Canada, guided by interpretive descriptive methods, found that FCGs perceived themselves as having two roles: client and co-worker. FCGs situated themselves as clients, where they actively sought help from the health care system. FCGs at times also perceived they had been situated as clients by health care providers, and were more resistant to accepting help. In other comments FCGs situated themselves as co-workers, seeking out an active role within the HPC team, whereas in other instances, felt they were situated as co-workers by a health care system with limited financial and human resources. Findings suggest that greater emphasis be placed on helping family members identify suitable interventions depending on how they view their roles within the HPC system. How we define family members in relation to the HPC system may also require reconsideration to reflect a more current conceptualization of realities in end-of-life care.
PubMed ID
18922609 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.