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Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271455
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2016 Jan;22(1):28-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Carina Lundh Hagelin
Christina Melin-Johansson
Ingela Henoch
Ingrid Bergh
Kristina Ek
Kina Hammarlund
Charlotte Prahl
Susann Strang
Lars Westin
Jane Österlind
Maria Browall
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2016 Jan;22(1):28-36
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Female
Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - psychology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Students, Nursing - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated.
The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used.
Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude.
Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students' attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.
PubMed ID
26804954 View in PubMed
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Palliative Care Research--A Systematic Review of foci, designs and methods of research conducted in Sweden between 2007 and 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280717
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2016 Mar;30(1):5-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Ingela Henoch
Ida Carlander
Maja Holm
Inger James
Elisabeth Kenne Sarenmalm
Carina Lundh Hagelin
Susanne Lind
Anna Sandgren
Joakim Öhlén
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2016 Mar;30(1):5-25
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Female
History, 21st Century
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Research Design
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2007, a literature review was undertaken of palliative care research from Sweden during the 1970s-2006, paving the way for a follow-up study to explore the recent developments. The aim was to systematically examine palliative care research from Sweden between 2007 and 2012, with special attention to methods, designs and research foci.
A literature review was undertaken. The databases Academic search elite, Age line, Ahmed, Cinahl, PsychInfo, PubMed, Scopus, Soc abstracts, Web of science and Libris were reviewed for Swedish palliative care research studies published from 2007 to 2012, applying the search criteria 'palliative care OR palliative medicine OR end-of-life care OR terminal care OR hospice care OR dying OR death'.
A total of 263 papers met the inclusion criteria, indicating an increased volume of research compared to the 133 articles identified in the previous review. Common study foci were symptom assessment and management, experiences of illness and care planning. Targeting non-cancer-specific populations and utilisation of population-based register studies were identified as new features. There was continued domination of cross-sectional, qualitative and mono-disciplinary studies, not including ethnic minority groups, nonverbally communicable people or children
PubMed ID
26190052 View in PubMed
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Experiences of security and continuity of care: Patients' and families' narratives about the work of specialized palliative home care teams.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286010
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2017 Apr;15(2):181-189
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Anna Klarare
Birgit H Rasmussen
Bjöörn Fossum
Carl Johan Fürst
Johan Hansson
Carina Lundh Hagelin
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2017 Apr;15(2):181-189
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Family - psychology
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Humans
Palliative Care - psychology
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Those who are seriously ill and facing death are often living with physical, emotional, social, and spiritual suffering. Teamwork is considered to be necessary to holistically meet the diverse needs of patients in palliative care. Reviews of studies regarding palliative care team outcomes have concluded that teams provide benefits, especially regarding pain and symptom management. Much of the research concerning palliative care teams has been performed from the perspective of the service providers and has less often focused on patients' and families' experiences of care.
Our aim was to investigate how the team's work is manifested in care episodes narrated by patients and families in specialized palliative home care (SPHC).
A total of 13 interviews were conducted with patients and families receiving specialized home care. Six patients and seven family members were recruited through SPHC team leaders. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and the transcripts qualitatively analyzed into themes.
Two themes were constructed through thematic analysis: (1) security ("They are always available," "I get the help I need quickly"); and (2) continuity of care ("They know me/us, our whole situation and they really care"). Of the 74 care episodes, 50 were descriptions of regularly scheduled visits, while 24 related to acute care visits and/or interventions.
Patients' and family members' descriptions of the work of SPHC teams are conceptualized through experiences of security and continuity of care. Experiences of security are fostered through the 24/7 availability of the team, sensitivity and flexibility in meeting patients' and families' needs, and practical adjustments to enable care at home. Experiences of continuity of care are fostered through the team's collective approach, where the individual team member knows the patients and family members, including their whole situation, and cares about the little things in life as well as caring for the family unit.
PubMed ID
27443410 View in PubMed
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Team interactions in specialized palliative care teams: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107212
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Sep;16(9):1062-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Anna Klarare
Carina Lundh Hagelin
Carl Johan Fürst
Bjöörn Fossum
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm, Sweden .
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Sep;16(9):1062-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Clinical Competence
Communication
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Professional Role
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
Teamwork is a standard of care in palliative care and that is emphasized by leading organizations. When interdisciplinary teams communicate their varied assessments, outcomes may be more than additive due to the synthesis of information. Interprofessionality does not guarantee multidimensionality in health care interventions, however, and that interprofessional teams promote collaboration may be questioned.
The aim was to explore team interaction among team members in specialized palliative care teams.
Semistructured interviews were conducted with health professionals working in specialized palliative home care teams. The interviews were analyzed by content analysis.
Participants were recruited from specialized palliative care units in Sweden. The 15 interviewees included 4 men and 11 women. Physcians, nurses, paramedical staff, and social workers were included.
Organizational issues like resources and leadership have a great impact on delivery of care. Competence was mirrored in education, collaboration, approach, and support within the team; while communication was described as key to being a team, resolving conflict, and executing palliative care.
Communication and communication patterns within the team create the feeling of being a team. Team climate and team performance are significantly impacted by knowledge and trust of competence in colleagues, with other professions, and by the available leadership. Proportions of different health professionals in the team have an impact on the focus and delivery of care. Interprofessional education giving clarity on one's own professional role and knowledge of other professions would most likely benefit patients and family caregivers.
PubMed ID
24041291 View in PubMed
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Translation and cultural adaptation of the Integrated Palliative care Outcome Scale including cognitive interviewing with patients and staff.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295196
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2017 Sep 11; 16(1):49
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-11-2017
Author
Ingela Beck
Ulrika Olsson Möller
Marlene Malmström
Anna Klarare
Henrik Samuelsson
Carina Lundh Hagelin
Birgit Rasmussen
Carl Johan Fürst
Author Affiliation
Institute for Palliative Care, Lund University and Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden. ingela.beck@hkr.se.
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2017 Sep 11; 16(1):49
Date
Sep-11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - methods - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation - methods - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
To expand our clinical and scientific knowledge about holistic outcomes within palliative care, there is a need for agreed-upon patient-reported outcome measures. These patient-reported outcome measures then require translation and cultural adaptation, either from country-specific languages to English, or the other way around. The aim of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the Integrated Palliative care Outcome Scale (IPOS) to the Swedish care context.
Swedish versions of IPOS Patient and IPOS Staff were developed and culturally adapted using recommended guidelines including cognitive interviews with patients (n = 13) and staff (n = 15) from different care contexts including general and specialised palliative care.
The comprehension and judgement difficulties identified in the pre-final patient and staff versions were successfully solved during the cognitive interviewing process. IPOS was well accepted by both patients and staff, none of the questions were experienced as inappropriate, and all questions were judged important.
In this study, we translated and culturally adapted the patient and staff versions of IPOS, and demonstrated face and content validity and acceptability of the scale through cognitive interviewing with patients and staff within residential care facility, surgical and specialised palliative home care units. Cognitive interviewing in parallel with patients and staff in rounds, with tentative analysis in between, was a suitable method for identifying and solving challenges with comprehension and evaluation in the pre-final version of IPOS. The Swedish IPOS is now available for use in a variety of clinical care settings.
Notes
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Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 Dec;46(6):925-37 PMID 23628515
PubMed ID
28893215 View in PubMed
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End of life of patients treated with haemodialysis as narrated by their close relatives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280480
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Dec;29(4):776-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Lena Axelsson
Birgitta Klang
Carina Lundh Hagelin
Stefan H Jacobson
Sissel Andreassen Gleissman
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Dec;29(4):776-84
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anecdotes as Topic
Caregivers - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - organization & administration - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Renal Dialysis - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
The study aimed to describe end of life for patients treated with maintenance haemodialysis as narrated by their close relatives.
Many patients undergoing haemodialysis are older, have several comorbidities and underestimated symptoms and are in their last year of life. To improve care, we need to know more about their end-of-life situation.
Qualitative and descriptive.
Qualitative retrospective interviews were conducted with 14 close relatives of deceased haemodialysis patients (3-13 months after death). Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The study is ethically approved.
In the last months, a gradual deterioration in health with acute episodes necessitating hospital admissions was described. This involved diminishing living space and expressions of dejection, but also of joy. Three patterns emerged in the last weeks: uncertain anticipation of death as life fades away; awaiting death after haemodialysis withdrawal; and sudden but not unexpected death following intensive care. Findings show complexities of decisions on haemodialysis withdrawal.
Different end-of-life patterns all involved increasingly complex care needs and existential issues. Findings show a need for earlier care planning. The identification of organisational factors to facilitate continuity and whole person care to meet these patients' specific care needs with their complex symptom burdens and comorbidities is needed. Findings indicate the need for integration of a palliative care approach in the treatment of patients in haemodialysis care.
PubMed ID
25754028 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.