Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2 records – page 1 of 1.

A good death from the perspective of palliative cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286321
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2017 Mar;25(3):933-939
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Lisa Kastbom
Anna Milberg
Marit Karlsson
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2017 Mar;25(3):933-939
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Death
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Palliative Care - methods - psychology - standards
Patient Preference - psychology
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology - standards
Terminally Ill - psychology
Abstract
Although previous research has indicated some recurrent themes and similarities between what patients from different cultures regard as a good death, the concept is complex and there is lack of studies from the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to explore the perception of a good death in dying cancer patients in Sweden.
Interviews were conducted with 66 adult patients with cancer in the palliative phase who were recruited from home care and hospital care. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.
Participants viewed death as a process. A good death was associated with living with the prospect of imminent death, preparing for death and dying comfortably, e.g., dying quickly, with independence, with minimised suffering and with social relations intact. Some were comforted by their belief that death is predetermined. Others felt uneasy as they considered death an end to existence. Past experiences of the death of others influenced participants' views of a good death.
Healthcare staff caring for palliative patients should consider asking them to describe what they consider a good death in order to identify goals for care. Exploring patients' personal experience of death and dying can help address their fears as death approaches.
Notes
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2001 Sep;22(3):717-2611532585
Cites: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2008 Feb-Mar;25(1):39-4418160544
Cites: Palliat Med. 2012 Jan;26(1):34-4221543526
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Aug 11;358(9280):483-811513933
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Nov 15;284(19):2476-8211074777
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007 Jul;34(1):81-9317531434
Cites: Palliat Med. 2005 Sep;19(6):454-6016218157
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2002 Sep;50(9):1541-812383152
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Jan 13;281(2):163-89917120
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-8816204405
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Dec;64(1-3):378-8616872786
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2012 May;20(5):1065-7121573739
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2011 Apr;61(585):167-7221439174
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1999 Dec;34(5 Pt 2):1189-20810591279
Cites: Palliat Med. 1996 Oct;10(4):307-128931066
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2001 Sep;22(3):727-3711532586
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 May 10;164(9):977-8115136306
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2011 Dec;21(12):1618-3121734224
Cites: SAGE Open Med. 2014 Apr 22;2:205031211453245626770726
Cites: Nurs Ethics. 1999 Mar;6(2):97-10610358525
Cites: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2012 Dec;29(8):632-922363039
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2011 Oct 10;29(29):3927-3121911715
Cites: Ann Oncol. 2007 Jun;18(6):1090-717355953
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2006 Feb;31(2):140-716488347
Cites: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2004 Mar-Apr;21(2):116-2015055511
Cites: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2006 Aug-Sep;23(4):277-8617060291
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2000 May 16;132(10):825-3210819707
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Mar;58(5):899-91114732604
PubMed ID
27837324 View in PubMed
Less detail

Experiences of truth disclosure in terminally ill cancer patients in palliative home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259776
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2011 Jun;9(2):173-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Maria Friedrichsen
Ann Lindholm
Anna Milberg
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2011 Jun;9(2):173-80
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Death
Communication
Female
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Preference - psychology
Physician-Patient Relations
Prognosis
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Terminally Ill - psychology
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and preferences of terminally ill cancer patients regarding truth telling in the communication of poor prognoses.
We recorded and transcribed interviews with 45 patients who knew their cancer was terminal, and analyzed their responses hermeneutically.
Patients identified three different modes of truth: (1) the absolute objective truth that they are dying; (2) the partial truth about their condition including some facts but not all of the details; and (3) the desired truth, originating in the patient's own beliefs about a healthy or better life. Coping strategies were related to patients' preferred mode of truth: (1) facing the truth in order to take action; (2) facing some parts of the truth in order to maintain hope; and (3) hovering between facing and avoiding the truth. In their struggle for existential survival, patients used different coping strategies, changing from one to another depending upon the circumstances.
Varying use of different coping strategies impacts on patient preferences concerning communication about bad news with their doctors. Truth-telling entails more than merely providing information related to the forthcoming death. It also concerns how physicians or other healthcare staff can support the patient's existential survival by fine-tuning the communication of "truth" according to the individuals' preferences.
PubMed ID
24468485 View in PubMed
Less detail