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Developing palliative care programs in Indigenous communities using participatory action research: a Canadian application of the public health approach to palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295136
Source
Ann Palliat Med. 2018 Apr; 7(Suppl 2):S52-S72
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Mary Lou Kelley
Holly Prince
Shevaun Nadin
Kevin Brazil
Maxine Crow
Gaye Hanson
Luanne Maki
Lori Monture
Christopher J Mushquash
Valerie O'Brien
Jeroline Smith
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, Centre for Education and Research on Aging & Health, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. mlkelley@lakeheadu.ca.
Source
Ann Palliat Med. 2018 Apr; 7(Suppl 2):S52-S72
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Public Health
Abstract
The Indigenous people of Canada include First Nations, Inuit and Metis. This research focused on four diverse First Nations communities located in Ontario and Manitoba. First Nations communities have well-established culturally-based social processes for supporting their community members experiencing dying, loss, grief and bereavement. However, communities do not have formalized local palliative care (PC) programs and have limited access to medical services, especially pain and symptom management.
Researchers conducted participatory action research (PAR) in partnership with four First Nations communities to create local PC programs. A conceptual framework for community capacity development (Kelley model) and an integrative framework for PC research with First Nations communities guided the research over 6 years. Based on a community assessment, Elders and Knowledge Carriers, community leaders and First Nations health care providers created PC programs grounded in the unique social, spiritual and cultural practices of each community, and integrated them into local health services. Maintaining local control, community members engaged external health care organizations to address gaps in health services. Strategies such as journey mapping clarified roles and strengthened partnerships between community and external health care providers. Finally, community members advocated for needed funding, medication and equipment to provide palliative home care. The research team provided mentorship, facilitation, support, education and resources to the community leaders and documented and evaluated their capacity development process.
Our findings contribute to PC practice, policy and research. Four unique PC programs were created that offered First Nations people the choice to receive PC at home, supported by family, community and culture. A workbook of culturally relevant resources was developed for use by interested First Nations communities across Canada, including resources for program development, direct care, education, and engaging external partners. Policy recommendations and a policy framework to guide PC program development in First Nations communities were created. All research outcomes were published on a website and disseminated nationally and internationally. Our work also contributes to furthering discussions of research methods that can advance public health and PC initiatives. We demonstrated the achievements of PAR methods in strengthening community action, developing the personal skills of community health care providers and creating more supportive environments for First Nations people who wish to die at home. The Kelley model was adapted for use by First Nations communities. We also identified keys to success for capacity development.
This research provides a Canadian example of implementing a public health approach to PC in an Indigenous context using PAR. It provides evidence of the effectiveness of a community capacity development as a strategy and illustrates how to implement it. This approach, fully grounded in local culture and context, has potential to be adapted to Indigenous communities elsewhere in Canada and internationally.
PubMed ID
29764173 View in PubMed
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Constipation in Specialized Palliative Care: Prevalence, Definition, and Patient-Perceived Symptom Distress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271796
Source
J Palliat Med. 2015 Jul;18(7):585-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Eva Erichsén
Anna Milberg
Tiny Jaarsma
Maria J Friedrichsen
Source
J Palliat Med. 2015 Jul;18(7):585-92
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Constipation - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Palliative Care
Prevalence
Sweden
Terminally ill
Abstract
The prevalence of constipation among patients in palliative care has varied in prior research, from 18% to 90%, depending on study factors.
The aim of this study was to describe and explore the prevalence and symptom distress of constipation, using different definitions of constipation, in patients admitted to specialized palliative care settings.
Data was collected in a cross-sectional survey from 485 patients in 38 palliative care units in Sweden. Variables were analyzed using logistic regression and summarized as odds ratio (OR).
The prevalence of constipation varied between 7% and 43%, depending on the definition used. Two constipation groups were found: (1) medical constipation group (MCG): =3 defecations/week, n=114 (23%) and (2) perceived constipation group (PCG): patients with a perception of being constipated in the last two weeks, n=171 (35%). Three subgroups emerged: patients with (1) only medical constipation (7%), (2) only perceived constipation (19%), and (3) both medical and perceived constipation (16%). There were no differences in symptom severity between groups; 71% of all constipated patients had severe constipation.
The prevalence of constipation may differ, depending on the definition used and how constipation is assessed. In this study we found two main groups and three subgroups, analyzed from the definitions of frequency of bowel movements and experience of being constipated. To be able to identify constipation, the patients' definition has to be further explored and assessed.
PubMed ID
25874474 View in PubMed
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Identifying educational needs in end-of-life care for staff and families of residents in care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172481
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2005 Sep;11(9):475-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Kevin Brazil
Julie Uma Vohra
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, and St Joseph's Health System Research Network, 105 Main Street East, Level P1, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 1G6, UK. brazilk@mcmaster.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2005 Sep;11(9):475-80
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - education
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Continuing
Family
Health Care Surveys
Health education
Humans
Needs Assessment
Nursing Homes
Ontario
Palliative Care
Abstract
the purpose of this article is to describe educational needs in end-of-life (EoL) care for staff and families of residents in long-term care (LTC) facilities in the province of Ontario, Canada. Barriers to providing end-of-life care education in LTC facilities are also identified.
cross-sectional survey of directors of care in all licensed LTC facilities in the province of Ontario, Canada.
directors of care from 426 (76.9% response rate) licensed LTC facilities completed a postal-survey questionnaire. Topics identified as very important for staff education included pain and symptom management and communication with family members about EoL care. Priorities for family education included respecting the residents' expressed wishes for care and communication about EoL care. Having sufficient institutional resources was identified as a major barrier to providing continuing education to both staff and families.
through examining educational needs in EoL care this study identified an environment of inadequate staffing and over-burdened care providers. The importance of increased staffing concomitant with education is a priority for LTC facilities.
PubMed ID
16215526 View in PubMed
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Ethical dilemmas around the dying patient with stroke: a qualitative interview study with team members on stroke units in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258547
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 2014 Jun;46(3):162-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Helene Eriksson
Gisela Andersson
Louise Olsson
Anna Milberg
Maria Friedrichsen
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 2014 Jun;46(3):162-70
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Communication Barriers
Female
Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing - ethics
Humans
Male
Neuroscience Nursing - ethics
Nurses' Aides - ethics - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - ethics - psychology
Nursing, Team - ethics
Palliative Care - ethics
Physical Therapists - ethics - psychology
Qualitative Research
Right to Die - ethics
Stroke - nursing - rehabilitation
Sweden
Terminal Care - ethics
Abstract
In Sweden, individuals affected by severe stroke are treated in specialized stroke units. In these units, patients are attended by a multiprofessional team with a focus on care in the acute phase of stroke, rehabilitation phase, and palliative phase. Caring for patients with such a large variety in condition and symptoms might be an extra challenge for the team. Today, there is a lack of knowledge in team experiences of the dilemmas that appear and the consequences that emerge. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to study ethical dilemmas, different approaches, and what consequences they had among healthcare professionals working with the dying patients with stroke in acute stroke units. Forty-one healthcare professionals working in a stroke team were interviewed either in focus groups or individually. The data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. The ethical dilemmas that appeared were depending on "nondecisions" about palliative care or discontinuation of treatments. The lack of decision made the team members act based on their own individual skills, because of the absence of common communication tools. When a decision was made, the healthcare professionals had "problems holding to the decision." The devised and applied plans could be revalued, which was described as a setback to nondecisions again. The underlying problem and theme was "communication barriers," a consequence related to the absence of common skills and consensus among the value system. This study highlights the importance of palliative care knowledge and skills, even for patients experiencing severe stroke. To make a decision and to hold on to that is a presupposition in creating a credible care plan. However, implementing a common set of values based on palliative care with symptom control and quality of life might minimize the risk of the communication barrier that may arise and increases the ability to create a healthcare that is meaningful and dignified.
PubMed ID
24796473 View in PubMed
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Does a half-day course about palliative care matter? A quantitative and qualitative evaluation among health care practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114602
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 May;16(5):496-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Maria Friedrichsen
Per-Anders Heedman
Eva Åstradsson
Maria Jakobsson
Anna Milberg
Author Affiliation
Palliative Education and Research Center in the County of Östergötland, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden. maria.friedrichsen@liu.se
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 May;16(5):496-501
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Educational Measurement
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To date there has been a paucity of research examining whether a course in palliative care influences the clinical work. Therefore a half-day course was started for different professionals.
The aims of this study were to quantitatively and qualitatively explore professionals' experience of the usefulness and importance of such a course.
An evaluation study was used with two measurement points in the quantitative part; qualitative focus group interviews were conducted three times.
Data was collected in Sweden through structured and open-ended questions (n=355) and in focus group discussions (n=40).
The majority of participants were allied professionals (86%). Course evaluation immediately after the intervention showed high scores. At three months, 78% of the 86 participants who had cared for a dying patient since the course claimed that the course had been useful in their work. In addition, there were improvements regarding symptom management (37%), support to family members (36%), more frequent break point conversations (31%), and improved cooperation in the teams (26%). The qualitative analysis showed that the course made participants start to compare their own working experiences with the new knowledge. When returning to work, the participants feel strengthened by the the newly acquired knowledge, but the will to improve the care also led to frustration, as some of the participants described that they wanted to change routines in the care of the dying, but felt hindered.
The course was appreciated and useful in the professionals' work, but it also created problems.
PubMed ID
23600332 View in PubMed
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Towards improving the co-ordination of supportive cancer care services in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178827
Source
Health Policy. 2004 Oct;70(1):125-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Kevin Brazil
Tim Whelan
Mary Ann O'Brien
Jonathan Sussman
Nancy Pyette
Daryl Bainbridge
Author Affiliation
The Supportive Cancer Care Research Unit, Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ont., Canada. brazilk@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Policy. 2004 Oct;70(1):125-31
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Efficiency, Organizational
Health Services Research
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Ontario
Palliative Care
Abstract
In this paper an evaluation approach to assess the co-ordination of supportive community cancer care is presented. The aim of the study was to identify current gaps in co-ordination of services in a selected region in the province of Ontario, Canada, determine how consistent these gaps were across the province of Ontario, and develop service design considerations for improving the co-ordination of supportive cancer care services in the province of Ontario. The study addressed services required by two populations -clients who had been recently diagnosed and those in the palliative stages of cancer. The evaluation was theory-driven and incorporated evidence from three methods: a systematic literature review, a community case study and a provincial scan. The results revealed the absence of a formal supportive cancer care system and a complex community care system. Supportive cancer care was shown to be delivered by a range of generalist programs that lacked specialisation in addressing the unique needs of cancer clients. In addition, there was no clear evidence of leadership for co-ordinating supportive cancer care, where client care was most often provided by multiple programs at any given point in time. The study generated recommendations to improve co-ordination of supportive cancer care at both the administrative as well as direct care level.
PubMed ID
15312714 View in PubMed
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Gender differences among Canadian spousal caregivers at the end of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152107
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2009 Mar;17(2):159-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Kevin Brazil
Lehana Thabane
Gary Foster
Michel Bédard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics & Division of Palliative Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. brazilk@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2009 Mar;17(2):159-66
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Caregivers
Confidence Intervals
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Odds Ratio
Palliative Care
Psychometrics
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Spouses
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in spousal caregiving at the end of life. The primary research question was to determine gender differences in caregiver strain among spousal caregivers. Secondary research questions investigated included (i) the presence of gender differences among spousal caregivers in the duration of care provided; (ii) gender differences among spousal caregivers in formal service use and unmet service needs; and (iii) whether support to care recipients in activities of daily living varied according to the gender of the spousal caregiver. The study was conducted over a 2-year period (2000-2002) in south-central Ontario, Canada. The study sample included 283 informal spousal caregivers (198 females, 85 males) each of whom were caring for a terminally ill spouse at the time they participated in a cross-sectional telephone survey. The analysis showed that females reported a significantly greater level of caregiving strain than males (t = -2.12, d.f. = 281, P = 0.035). When considering source of support in activities of daily living for the care recipient, differential assistance was noted on the basis of caregiver gender. Female caregivers had almost twice the odds of providing support in toileting-related tasks than male caregivers (odds ratio (OR) = 1.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-3.85, P = 0.044), while male caregivers had approximately twice the odds of providing support in mobility-related tasks (OR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.21-0.81, P = 0.011). Care recipients who had a female caregiver had lower odds of receiving support from family and friends in tasks associated with personal care (OR = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.05-0.53, P = 0.002). To address gender differences in caregiving, a realistic home-based palliative care approach must take into account the importance of informal caregivers.
PubMed ID
19281516 View in PubMed
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Correlates of health status for family caregivers in bereavement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185942
Source
J Palliat Med. 2002 Dec;5(6):849-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Kevin Brazil
Michel Bédard
Kathleen Willison
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. brazilk@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Palliat Med. 2002 Dec;5(6):849-55
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bereavement
Caregivers - psychology
Female
Health status
Home Nursing
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario
Palliative Care
Retrospective Studies
Terminal Care - methods
Abstract
The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to identify aspects of caregiving associated with health status among family caregivers in bereavement. Study participants included 151 family caregivers of terminally ill patients who had died, on average, 294 days prior to the study telephone interview. The interview covered two main areas: patient characteristics and caregiver characteristics. Multivariate linear regressions revealed that as the age of the care recipient (regression coefficient [b] = -0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.48,-0.15) and caregiver (b = -0.14; 95% CI = -0.25, -0.02) increased, caregivers experienced a decline in their physical health during bereavement. Furthermore, caregivers who reported that caregiving interrupted their usual activities (b = -5.97; 95% CI = -9.79, -2.15) had a decline in physical health during bereavement. A poorer mental health status during bereavement was seen in caregivers who reported poor physical health during caregiving (b = -4.31; 95% CI = -8.17, -0.45); and that they received insufficient family support in caregiving (b = -6.01; 95% CI = -9.75, -2.27). It was also revealed that a home death was associated with higher mental health of the caregiver (b = 3.55; 95% CI = 0.26, 6.84). The practice implications of these findings are discussed in this paper.
PubMed ID
12685531 View in PubMed
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Moral distress experienced by health care professionals who provide home-based palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140887
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Nov;71(9):1687-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Kevin Brazil
Sharon Kassalainen
Jenny Ploeg
Denise Marshall
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Kevin Brazil, 105 Main Street East, Level P1, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 1G6, Canada. brazilk@mcmaster.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Nov;71(9):1687-91
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers
Delivery of Health Care
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Home Care Services
Humans
Middle Aged
Morals
Ontario
Palliative Care - psychology
Qualitative Research
Role
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Health care providers regularly encounter situations of moral conflict and distress in their practice. Moral distress may result in unfavorable outcomes for both health care providers and those in their care. The purpose of this study was to examine the experience of moral distress from a broad range of health care occupations that provide home-based palliative care as the initial step of addressing the issue. A critical incident approach was used in qualitative interviews to elicit the experiences on moral distress from 18 health care providers drawn from five home visiting organizations in south central Ontario, Canada. Most participants described at least two critical incidents in their interview generating a total of 47 critical incidents. Analyses of the critical incidents revealed 11 issues that triggered moral distress which clustered into three themes, (a) the role of informal caregivers, b) challenging clinical situations and (c) service delivery issues. The findings suggest that the training and practice environments for health care providers need to be designed to recognize the moral challenges related to day-to-day practice.
PubMed ID
20832923 View in PubMed
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Dying cancer patients' own opinions on euthanasia: an expression of autonomy? A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134773
Source
Palliat Med. 2012 Jan;26(1):34-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Marit Karlsson
Anna Milberg
Peter Strang
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. marit.karlsson@ki.se
Source
Palliat Med. 2012 Jan;26(1):34-42
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Decision Making
Euthanasia - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care
Personal Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
Deliberations on euthanasia are mostly theoretical, and often lack first-hand perspectives of the affected persons.
Sixty-six patients suffering from cancer in a palliative phase were interviewed about their perspectives of euthanasia in relation to autonomy. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis with no predetermined categories.
The informants expressed different positions on euthanasia, ranging from support to opposition, but the majority were undecided due to the complexity of the problem. The informants' perspectives on euthanasia in relation to autonomy focused on decision making, being affected by (1) power and (2) trust. Legalization of euthanasia was perceived as either (a) increasing patient autonomy by patient empowerment, or (b) decreasing patient autonomy by increasing the medical power of the health care staff, which could be frightening. The informants experienced dependence on others, and expressed various levels of trust in others' intentions, ranging from full trust to complete mistrust.
Dying cancer patients perceive that they cannot feel completely independent, which affects true autonomous decision making. Further, when considering legalization of euthanasia, the perspectives of patients fearing the effects of legalization should also be taken into account, not only those of patients opting for it.
PubMed ID
21543526 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.