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67 records – page 1 of 7.

Activity-induced dental modification in holocene siberian hunter-fisher-gatherers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100395
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010 Oct;143(2):266-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Andrea Waters-Rist
Vladimir I Bazaliiskii
Andrzej Weber
Olga I Goriunova
M Anne Katzenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N-1N4. awaters@ucalgary.ca
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010 Oct;143(2):266-78
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia, Central
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Fossils
Geography
History, Ancient
Humans
Male
Mandible
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupations
Paleodontology
Sex Distribution
Siberia
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth - anatomy & histology
Tooth Attrition
Abstract
The use of teeth as tools provides clues to past subsistence patterns and cultural practices. Five Holocene period hunter-fisher-gatherer mortuary sites from the south-western region of Lake Baikal, Siberia, Russian Federation, are observed for activity-induced dental modification (AIDM) to further characterize their adaptive regimes. Grooves on the occlusal surfaces of teeth are observed in 25 out of 123 individuals (20.3%) and were most likely produced during the processing of fibers from plants and animals, for making items such as nets and cordage. Regional variation in the frequency of individuals with occlusal grooves is found in riverine versus lakeshore sites. This variation suggests that production of material culture items differed, perhaps in relation to different fishing practices. There is also variation in the distribution of grooves by sex: grooves are found predominately in females, except at the Late Neolithic-Bronze Age river site of Ust'-Ida I where grooves are found exclusively in males. Occlusal grooves were cast using polyvinylsiloxane and maxillary canine impressions were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine striation patterns. Variation in striae orientation suggests that a variety of activities, and/or different manufacturing techniques, were involved in groove production. Overall, the variability in occlusal groove frequency, sex and regional distribution, and microscopic striae patterns, points to the multiplicity of activities and ways in which people used their mouths and teeth in cultural activities.
PubMed ID
20853480 View in PubMed
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Advances in the dental search for Native American origins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241352
Source
Acta Anthropogenet. 1984;8(1-2):23-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
C G Turner
Source
Acta Anthropogenet. 1984;8(1-2):23-78
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas
Anthropology, Physical
Asia - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Biological Evolution
Humans
Indians, North American
Indians, South American
Paleodontology
Population Dynamics
Tooth - anatomy & histology
Abstract
The Sinodont dental morphology pattern of NE Asia is today more complex and was so by 20,000 years ago, than the simplified Sundadonty of SE Asia-Oceania, and the very simplified pattern that evolved greater than 20,000 B.P. All Native Americans are Sinodonts. Intra--and inter-hemispheric statistical analyses of 28 dental traits in greater than 6000 N & S American and greater than 1100 NE Asian crania reveal three temporally stable American sub-patterns, suggesting prior evolution in Sino-Siberia. The hypothesized biocultural associations and migration episodes are: (1) "Upper Cave" Sinodonts with the generalized Chinese Microlithic Tradition reach the Arctic steppe via the Lena basin to become Paleo--and most later Indians. (2) Smaller-game-hunting Siberian Diuktaians cross to Alaska at forest-forming terminal land bridge times to become Paleo-Arctic and subsequent Na-Dene-speaking NW forest Indians. (3) Lower Amur basin-N Japan blade-makingfolk evolve a coastal culture on the way to the land bridge's SE terminus at Anangula-Umnak where the oldest skeletons of the dentally distinctive but variable Aleut-Eskimos have been found.
PubMed ID
6085675 View in PubMed
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Affinities between the 11th century Vivallen/Jämtland and Nordic and Saami groups based on tooth size and morphology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38693
Source
Pages 213-217 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Alexandersen, V
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Coppenhagen, Coppenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 213-217 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Child
Comparative Study
Ethnic groups - history
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, Medieval
Humans
Odontometry
Paleodontology - history
Scandinavia
Tooth - anatomy & histology
PubMed ID
3078493 View in PubMed
Documents
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Age determination of an Alaskan mummy: morphological and biochemical correlation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1587
Source
Science. 1978 Sep 1;201(4358):811-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1978
Author
Masters, P.M.
Zimmerman, M.R.
Author Affiliation
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Source
Science. 1978 Sep 1;201(4358):811-2
Date
Sep-1-1978
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Trauma
Age at death
Tattoos
Atherosclerosis
Aspartic Acid
Bicuspid
Female
History, Ancient
Humans
Middle Aged
Mummies
Paleodontology
Stereoisomerism
Abstract
Aspartic acid racemization analysis of a tooth from an Alaskan mummy yielded an age at death of 53 (+/- 5) years, which correlates well with earlier estimates based on morphological features. This study illustrates the value of integrative approaches to paleopathologic problems and the importance of preserving rare specimens for the application of new techniques.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 179.
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Analysis of dental attrition and mortality in the Medieval village of Tirup, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70905
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2005 Feb;126(2):169-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Jesper L Boldsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, Department of Anthropology (ADBOU), University of Southern Denmark, DK 5000 Odense C, Denmark. Jboldsen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2005 Feb;126(2):169-76
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
History, Medieval
Humans
Male
Mortuary Practice
Paleodontology
Tooth Attrition - history - mortality - pathology
Abstract
New directions and new questions raised in the study of health in the past justify this reanalysis of the pattern of dental attrition in the Medieval Danish population of Tirup. Dental attrition was scored on all permanent molars from the Tirup skeletal sample. Scores were analyzed by means of logistic regression of the probability of having entered a given stage of wear for a given tooth in a way that is very similar to transition analysis. The primary determinant of dental attrition was age at death. In addition to age, the effects of sex, side, and dating were analyzed. In order to assess the homogeneity of the process of wearing teeth down, a third-order polynomial in age-at-death was also fitted to the transition probabilities. It was found that age is the single most important determinant of dental attrition, and that sex or side did not differentiate the rate of attrition. In several transitions, there was evidence of heterogeneity, indicating both random and systematic interpersonal differences in the rate of attrition and an association between the rate of attrition and age-at-death. It was found that attrition proceeded more quickly after AD 1300 than prior to that date. It is suggested that this was due to a possible general deterioration of living conditions in Northern Europe and an increased reliance on grain for food during the first half of the 14th century. The temporal effect on attrition rate accounts for some but not all the observed heterogeneity wear.
PubMed ID
15386219 View in PubMed
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An assessment of health and disease in the prehistoric inhabitants of the Mariana Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206993
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1997 Nov;104(3):315-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
M. Pietrusewsky
M T Douglas
R M Ikehara-Quebral
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Hawai'i-Manoa, Honolulu 96822, USA. mikep@hawaii.edu
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1997 Nov;104(3):315-42
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - history - pathology
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - history
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Life tables
Male
Micronesia - epidemiology
Osteoarthritis - epidemiology - history
Paleodontology
Paleopathology
Prevalence
Tooth Diseases - epidemiology - history - pathology
Abstract
Using a variety of skeletal and dental stress indicators, an assessment of the health and disease of the indigenous inhabitants of the Mariana Islands, the Chamorro, is made. The major hypothesis to be tested is that the Chamorro were relatively healthy and that deviations from the expected, as well as inter-island variation, may reflect environmental, ecological, and cultural differences. The major skeletal series surveyed include sites on Guam (N = 247 individuals), Rota (N = 14), Tinian (N = 20), and Saipan (N = 102). The majority of the specimens are from the transitional pre-Latte (AD 1-1000) and Latte (AD 1000-1521) periods. These data derive primarily from unpublished osteological reports. The indicators of health and disease surveyed include mortality and paleodemographic data, stature, dental paleopathology, cribra orbitalia, limb bone fractures, degenerative osteoarthritis, and infectious disease (including treponemal infection). Where appropriate, tests of significance are calculated to determine the presence of any patterning in the differences observed within and between the skeletal series. Information recorded in prehistoric Hawaiians provides a standard for external comparisons. Several of the larger skeletal series surveyed have paleodemographic features that are consistent with long-term cemetery populations. Females and subadults are typically underrepresented. Most subadult deaths occur in the 2-5 year age interval. Life expectancy at birth ranges from 26.4 to 33.7 years. A healthy fertility rate is indicated for these series. The prehistoric inhabitants of the Mariana Islands were relatively tall, exceeding living Chamorros measured in the early part of the present century. The greater prevalence of developmental defects in the enamel suggests that the Chamorro were exposed to more stress than prehistoric Hawaiians. The low frequency of cribra orbitalia further indicates iron deficiency anemia was not a problem. There are generally low frequencies of dental pathology in the remains from the Mariana Islands. Betel-nut staining is relatively common in all series which may help to explain the relatively low prevalence of dental pathology. Healed limb bone fractures are rare in these skeletal series; the frequency and patterns of fractures suggest accidental injury as the main cause. Greater physical demands involving the lower back region are indicated by a high frequency of spondylolysis, or stress fracture in the lumbar vertebrae in the Chamorro. Likewise, advanced degenerative bone changes, while of low occurrence, are significantly greater in the Chamorro than Hawaiians. The prevalence of skeletal and dental indicators of stress was generally higher in the smaller islands of the Mariansas chain (e.g., Rota), islands with fewer resources to buffer environmental catastrophe. Bony changes suggestive of treponemal (probably yaws) disease are common in most of these Marianas Islands skeletal series.
PubMed ID
9408539 View in PubMed
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An enigmatic hypoplastic defect of the deciduous canine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237799
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1986 Jan;69(1):59-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1986
Author
M F Skinner
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1986 Jan;69(1):59-69
Date
Jan-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Cuspid - abnormalities
Dental Enamel Hypoplasia - epidemiology
Fossils
History, Ancient
Humans
India
Paleodontology
Tooth, Deciduous - abnormalities
Abstract
A roughly circular hypoplastic defect restricted to the labial enamel surface of the deciduous canine is described. This pathology is quite common in available samples of Upper Paleolithic and Neolithic children and a cadaver sample of recent Calcuttans, affecting 44% to 70% of individuals. It is rare in a Neanderthal sample and in children from a clinical practice in Vancouver. The lesion occurs twice as commonly in the lower jaw. The defect appears to commence at or after birth owing to localized pressure on thin or nonexistent alveolar bone overlying the bulging crypt of the deciduous canine. Population differences in the incidence of the pathology probably reflect innate and acquired variation in hard and soft tissue thicknesses in this region.
PubMed ID
3511731 View in PubMed
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Aspects of teeth from archaelogic sites in Sweden and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33952
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):14-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
V. Alexandersen
J G Norén
I. Hoyer
W. Dietz
G. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, Panum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):14-9
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids - adverse effects
Burial
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Dental Enamel - anatomy & histology - embryology - ultrastructure
Dentin - anatomy & histology - ultrastructure
Environment
Food Habits
Gestational Age
History, Ancient
Humans
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Microscopy, Polarization
Molar - anatomy & histology - ultrastructure
Paleodontology
Porosity
Postmortem Changes
Sweden
Tooth Abrasion - pathology
Tooth, Deciduous - anatomy & histology - embryology - ultrastructure
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine ground sections of primary second molars and permanent first molars from the same jaws. Teeth from 11 individuals were collected from archaeologic sites in Sweden and Denmark. Longitudinal buccolingual sections were examined in a polarization light microscope and in a Philips scanning electron microscope (SEM). The seven teeth from Sweden appeared to have been subjected to environmental influences at their burial site, which had affected both the dentin and the enamel. The teeth from the Danish sites had a normal color, and no disintegration of the dentin was seen. The general morphologic appearance was normal in all primary and permanent teeth. The position of the neonatal line indicated a normal full-term gestational age. The observed accentuated incremental lines in both the primary and permanent enamel suggested periods of dietary changes, possibly related to periods of illness. SEM images of the surface area of the Swedish teeth showed an extremely porous enamel surface with severe changes in the prism structure as an effect of acid penetration. The Danish teeth did not show any marked changes in the enamel.
PubMed ID
9537729 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.