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The association between gender, coping style and whiplash related symptoms in sufferers of whiplash associated disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165458
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Feb;48(1):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Allan Jones
Ask Elklit
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Aarhus, Denmark. allanj@psy.au.dk
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Feb;48(1):75-80
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adult
Denmark
Emotions - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Pain - psychology
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Whiplash Injuries - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine specifically whether the relationship between coping style and symptoms of whiplash injury change as a function of gender. A total of 1709 sufferers of whiplash associated disorder (1349 women, 360 men) belonging to the Danish Society for Polio, Traffic and Accident Victims completed questionnaires measuring demographic and psychological factors (including coping style), and symptoms of whiplash trauma (including pain). Men and women were not found to differ significantly in their use of coping strategies, however emotion focused coping strategies were related significantly more strongly to whiplash related symptoms in men compared to women. Women were found to display more symptoms related to whiplash injury compared to men. Possible reasons for the present findings are discussed in light of related research indicating mood as a potential moderating variable in the relationship between maladaptive coping style and degree of symptoms related to injury in men.
PubMed ID
17257372 View in PubMed
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Can the painDETECT Questionnaire score and MRI help predict treatment outcome in rheumatoid arthritis: protocol for the Frederiksberg hospital's Rheumatoid Arthritis, pain assessment and Medical Evaluation (FRAME-cohort) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264830
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(11):e006058
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Signe Rifbjerg-Madsen
Anton Wulf Christensen
Mikael Boesen
Robin Christensen
Bente Danneskiold-Samsøe
Henning Bliddal
Else Marie Bartels
Henning Locht
Kirstine Amris
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(11):e006058
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Chronic Pain
Cohort Studies
Contrast Media - diagnostic use
Denmark
Female
Hand Joints - drug effects - pathology
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Image Enhancement - methods
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Pain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is traditionally considered to be of inflammatory origin. Despite better control of inflammation, some patients still report pain as a significant concern, even when being in clinical remission. This suggests that RA may prompt central sensitisation-one aspect of chronic pain. In contrast, other patients report good treatment response, although imaging shows signs of inflammation, which could indicate a possible enhancement of descending pain inhibitory mechanisms. When assessing disease activity in patients with central sensitisation, the commonly used disease activity scores (eg, DAS28-CRP (C reactive protein)) will yield constant high total scores due to high tender joint count and global health assessments, whereas MRI provides an isolated estimate of inflammation. The objective of this study is, in patients with RA initiating anti-inflammatory treatment, to explore the prognostic value of a screening questionnaire for central sensitisation, hand inflammation assessed by conventional MRI, and the interaction between them regarding treatment outcome evaluated by clinical status (DAS28-CRP). For the purpose of further exploratory analyses, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is performed.
The painDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ), originally developed to screen for a neuropathic pain component, is applied to indicate the presence of central sensitisation. Adults diagnosed with RA are included when either (A) initiating disease-modifying antirheumatic drug treatment, or (B) initiating or switching to biological therapy. We anticipate that 100 patients will be enrolled, tested and reassessed after 4 months of treatment.
Clinical data, conventional MRI, DCE-MRI, blood samples and patient-reported outcomes.
This study aims at supporting rheumatologists to define strategies to reach optimal treatment outcomes in patients with RA based on chronic pain prognostics. The study has been approved by The Capital region of Denmark's Ethics Committee; identification number H-3-2013-049. The results will be published in international peer-reviewed journals.
Notes
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Cites: Eur J Radiol. 2013 Aug;82(8):1286-9123562303
PubMed ID
25394817 View in PubMed
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Catastrophizing as a cognitive vulnerability factor related to depression in workers' compensation patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153523
Source
J Clin Psychol Med Settings. 2008 Sep;15(3):182-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Eun-Jeong Lee
Ming-Yi Wu
Gloria K Lee
Gladys Cheing
Fong Chan
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3105 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60616, USA. elee20@iit.edu
Source
J Clin Psychol Med Settings. 2008 Sep;15(3):182-92
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Workers' Compensation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the role of catastrophizing as a mediator and moderator between life stress and depression in a sample of workers' compensation patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Pain intensity, life stress (especially work and financial stress), and catastrophizing contributed significantly to depression. Catastrophizing was found to be partially mediating the relationship between life stress and depression and a moderator between social stress and depression. The results supported the role of catastrophizing as a cognitive vulnerability-stress factor related to depression in chronic pain patients. Screening for life stress and intervening early to prevent catastrophizing from occurring in the workers' compensation rehabilitation process may reduce psychosocial distress and enhance the overall effectiveness of rehabilitation programming for workers' compensation patients with chronic pain.
PubMed ID
19104963 View in PubMed
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Development and validation of a brief, descriptive Danish pain questionnaire (BDDPQ).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13832
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2004 Apr;48(4):486-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
F M Perkins
M U Werner
F. Persson
K. Holte
T S Jensen
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. Fred.Perkins@med.va.gov
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2004 Apr;48(4):486-90
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Language
Pain - diagnosis
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A new pain questionnaire should be simple, be documented to have discriminative function, and be related to previously used questionnaires. METHODS: Word meaning was validated by using bilingual Danish medical students and asking them to translate words taken from the Danish version of the McGill pain questionnaire into English. Evaluative word value was estimated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Discriminative function was assessed by having patients with one of six painful conditions (postherpetic neuralgia, phantom limb pain, rheumatoid arthritis, ankle fracture, appendicitis, or labor pain) complete the questionnaire. RESULTS: We were not able to find Danish words that were reliably back-translated to the English words 'splitting' or 'gnawing'. A simple three-word set of evaluative terms had good separation when rated on a VAS scale ('let' 17.5+/-6.5 mm; 'moderat' 42.7+/-8.6 mm; and 'staerk' 74.9+/-9.7 mm). The questionnaire was able to discriminate among the six painful conditions with 77% accuracy by just using the descriptive words. The accuracy of the questionnaire increased to 96% with the addition of evaluative terms (for pain at rest and with activity), chronicity (acute vs. chronic), and location of the pain. CONCLUSIONS: A Danish pain questionnaire that subjects and patients can self-administer has been developed and validated relative to the words used in the English McGill Pain questionnaire. The discriminative ability of the questionnaire among some common painful conditions has been tested and documented. The questionnaire may be of use in patient care and research.
PubMed ID
15025613 View in PubMed
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Do more MRI findings imply worse disability or more intense low back pain? A cross-sectional study of candidates for lumbar disc prosthesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107747
Source
Skeletal Radiol. 2013 Nov;42(11):1593-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Linda Berg
Christian Hellum
Øivind Gjertsen
Gesche Neckelmann
Lars Gunnar Johnsen
Kjersti Storheim
Jens Ivar Brox
Geir Egil Eide
Ansgar Espeland
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Jonas Liesvei 65, 5021, Bergen, Norway, linda.berg@kir.uib.no.
Source
Skeletal Radiol. 2013 Nov;42(11):1593-602
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Causality
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Intervertebral Disc Degeneration - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Lumbar Vertebrae - surgery
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - utilization
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Total Disc Replacement - instrumentation - utilization
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine whether combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings are related to the degree of disability and low back pain (LBP) in candidates for lumbar disc prosthesis surgery.
This cross-sectional study included 170 disc prosthesis candidates (mean age 41 years; 88 women) with chronic non-radicular LBP and localized disc degeneration. Experienced radiologists rated Modic changes and disc findings at L4-S1 on pre-treatment MRIs. An MRI total score (0-10) for findings at L4/L5 plus L5/S1 was calculated for Modic type I and/or II changes, a posterior high intensity zone (HIZ) in the disc, dark/black nucleus pulposus signal, and =40 % disc height decrease. We analyzed the relationship of the MRI total score to the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) (n?=?170) and LBP intensity scores (0-100 visual analogue scale, n?=?165) using multiple linear regression and adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, smoking, and anxiety/depression.
The MRI total score was not related to ODI (regression coefficient 0.12, p?=?0.79) or LBP intensity (regression coefficient 0.64, p?=?0.37). When individual MRI findings were analyzed, patients with HIZ at L5/S1 had slightly lower ODI scores (4.7 points, p?=?0.02). In post hoc analyses, results remained unchanged after adding facet arthropathy to the MRI total score and adjusting also for physical workload and physical leisure-time activity.
The combined MRI findings were not related to the degree of disability or the intensity of LBP. These degenerative MRI findings cannot explain variation in pre-treatment disability and pain in patients with chronic LBP accepted for disc prosthesis surgery.
PubMed ID
23982421 View in PubMed
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Effects of anesthesia on pain after lower-limb amputation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166034
Source
J Clin Anesth. 2006 Dec;18(8):600-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Bill Y Ong
Amarjit Arneja
Edmund W Ong
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3A 1R9. billong@mts.net
Source
J Clin Anesth. 2006 Dec;18(8):600-4
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amputation - adverse effects - methods
Amputation Stumps
Anesthesia, Epidural - methods - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, General - methods - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, Spinal - methods - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Lower Extremity - surgery
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neuralgia - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Pain, Postoperative - epidemiology
Phantom Limb - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
To evaluate the effects of epidural, spinal, and general anesthesia on pain after lower-limb amputation.
Cross-sectional survey.
Postamputation clinic.
150 patients who were evaluated one to 24 months after their lower-limb amputation.
Patients received epidural, spinal, or general anesthesia for their amputation.
Standardized questions were used to assess stump pain, phantom sensation, or phantom limb pain preoperatively and postoperatively. Pain intensity was assessed on a verbal rating scale of 0 to 10. After the interview, each patient's medical history and anesthetic record were assessed.
Patients who had received epidural anesthesia and those who had received spinal anesthesia recalled significantly less pain in the week after their surgery (P
PubMed ID
17175430 View in PubMed
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Electroencephalographic response to procedural pain in healthy term newborn infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92862
Source
Pediatr Res. 2008 Oct;64(4):429-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Norman Elisabeth
Rosén Ingmar
Vanhatalo Sampsa
Stjernqvist Karin
Okland Ove
Fellman Vineta
Hellström-Westas Lena
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Lund University Hospital, Lund SE-22185, Sweden. elisabeth.norman@med.lu.se
Source
Pediatr Res. 2008 Oct;64(4):429-34
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Cortex - physiology
Electroencephalography
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Norway
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Physical Stimulation
Abstract
The current study aimed to characterize changes in EEG-related measures after noxious stimuli in neonates and to assess their potential utility as measures of pain and/or discomfort during neonatal intensive care. Seventy-two healthy term infants were investigated: Twenty-eight had a non-skin-breaking pin-prick on the heel, randomized to receive either oral glucose (n = 16) or water (n = 12) before the stimulus. Twenty-one infants were studied during a venous blood sample from the dorsum of the hand, 23 infants during a capillary heel stick. Behavioral pain responses were assessed with the Premature Infant Pain Profile Scale. The stimulus evoked a significant increase in higher frequency components (10-30 Hz) which also correlated to behavioral measures. The frontotemporal localization of the increased activity with frequency bands similar to electromuscular artifacts and the relation to behavioral measures confirmed that this activity corresponds to an increase in muscle tone. There was no change in frontal EEG asymmetry in any of the groups. The present results indicate that responses in cortical activity recorded by EEG are not useful for clinical assessment of infants' responses to noxious stimuli.
PubMed ID
18594483 View in PubMed
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The impact of sampling and measurement on the prevalence of self-reported pain in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182534
Source
Pain Res Manag. 2003;8(3):157-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Elizabeth G Van Den Kerkhof
Wilma M Hopman
Tanveer E Towheed
Tassos P Anastassiades
David H Goldstein
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Canada. ev5@post.queensu.ca
Source
Pain Res Manag. 2003;8(3):157-63
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Patient Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Selection Bias
Abstract
Pain is an important public health problem in Canada. International estimates of general population pain prevalence range from 2% to 46%.
The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the potentially misleading use of overall prevalence estimates in the pain literature and to use two Canadian population-based surveys to assess the impact of sampling and measurement on prevalence.
Two of the secondary data sets used were the 1996/97 National Population and Health Survey (NPHS) and the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). This paper is based on the assessment of chronic pain in the NPHS, and the assessment of short term pain using the Medical Outcomes Trust's 36-item health survey and the Health Utilities Index, both collected by CaMos. Data are presented as frequencies and percentages overall and stratified by age and sex. CaMos prevalence estimates were age- and sex-standardized to the NPHS population.
The overall prevalence of pain was 39% for one-week pain, 66% for four-week pain and 15% for chronic pain. Women were more likely to report pain than men and the prevalence of pain increased with age.
This study yields useful information about the self-reported responses to a variety of questions assessing pain in the general population. Responses to the different questions likely represent different categories of pain, such as short term versus chronic pain, which in turn may have different epidemiological risk factors and profiles. Longitudinal studies of the epidemiology, predictors and natural history of chronic pain are urgently needed in the Canadian population.
PubMed ID
14657983 View in PubMed
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Improved quality of life, working ability, and patient satisfaction after a pretreatment multimodal assessment method in patients with mixed chronic muscular pain: a randomized-controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125580
Source
Clin J Pain. 2013 Mar;29(3):195-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Mats Georg Rothman
Monica Ortendahl
Andreas Rosenblad
Ann-Christin Johansson
Author Affiliation
Psychosomatic Medicine Clinic and Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden. mats.rothman@ltv.se
Source
Clin J Pain. 2013 Mar;29(3):195-204
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myofascial Pain Syndromes - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Work Capacity Evaluation
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
To investigate whether a pretreatment multimodal (MM) assessment of patients with chronic muscular pain has an impact on treatment outcome.
The present randomized-controlled study evaluated an MM assessment compared with routine multidisciplinary assessment given to a control group. The study population consisted of primary care patients with mixed chronic muscular pain. Variables assessed were: pain intensity, depression, life stress, quality of life (QOL), disability, working ability, and treatment satisfaction. Follow-up was performed at 15 months and 182 patients of 220 (83%) completed the study.
Univariate and multivariate logistic regression showed from baseline to 15 months a significant improvement in QOL as measured by Short-Form 36 in the MM group compared with the control group on the domains of physical function (odds ratio 2.40; 95% confidence interval 1.32-4.37), role physical (2.37; 1.10-5.09), and role emotional (2.05; 1.05-3.96). Working ability improved more significantly in the MM group (46% vs. 35%) and impairment was less (1% vs. 15%) compared with the control group (P=0.016). Satisfaction with the assessment was, on average, higher (P
PubMed ID
22469637 View in PubMed
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Measurement Properties of the Nordic Questionnaire for Psychological and Social Factors at Work: A Rasch Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285092
Source
J Appl Meas. 2016;17(2):227-238
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Roe
K. Myhre
G H Marchand
B. Lau
G. Leivseth
E. Bautz-Holter
Source
J Appl Meas. 2016;17(2):227-238
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Computer simulation
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Models, Statistical
Neck Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Psychology
Psychometrics - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Risk Assessment - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The main aim of this study was to evaluate the measurement properties of the Nordic Questionnaire for Psychological and Social Factors at Work (QPS Nordic) and the domains of demand, control and support. The Rasch analysis (RUMM 2030) was based on responses from 226 subjects with back pain who completed the QPS Nordic dimensions of demand, control, and social support (30 items) at one year follow up. The Rasch analysis revealed disordered thresholds in a total of 25 of the 30 items. The domains of demand, control and support fit the Rasch model when analyzed separately. The demand domain was well targeted, whereas patients with current neck and back pain had lower control and higher support than reflected by the questions. Two items revealed DIF by gender, otherwise invariance to age, gender, occupation and sick-leave was documented. The demand, control support domains of QPS Nordic comprised unidimensional constructs with adequate measurement properties.
PubMed ID
28009586 View in PubMed
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