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Agreement, reliability and validity in 3 shoulder questionnaires in patients with rotator cuff disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157177
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008;9:68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Ole M Ekeberg
Erik Bautz-Holter
Einar K Tveitå
Anne Keller
Niels G Juel
Jens I Brox
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. o.m.ekeberg@medisin.uio.no
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008;9:68
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - methods - standards
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires - standards
Rotator Cuff - pathology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Self-report questionnaires play an important role as outcome measures in shoulder research. Having an estimate of the measurement error of these questionnaires is of importance when assessing follow-up results after treatment and when planning intervention studies. The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt the Norwegian version of the OSS and WORC questionnaire and examine and compare agreement, reliability and construct validity of the disease-specific shoulder questionnaire WORC with two commonly used shoulder questionnaires, SPADI and OSS, in patients with rotator cuff disease.
74 patients with rotator cuff disease were recruited from the outpatient clinic of the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at Ullevaal University Hospital in Oslo, Norway. A test-retest design was used, and the questionnaires were filled out by the patients at the clinic, with a one week interval between test administrations. Agreement (repeatability coefficient), reliability (ICC) and construct validity were examined and compared for WORC, SPADI and OSS.
Reliability analysis was restricted to the 55 patients (51 +/- 10 yrs) who reported no change between test administrations according to scoring on a global scale. The agreement, reliability and construct validity was moderate for all three questionnaires with ICC ranging from 0.83 to 0.85, repeatability coefficient from 16.1 to 19.7 and Spearman rank correlations between total scores from r = 0.57 to 0.69. There was a lower degree of floor and ceiling effects in SPADI compared to WORC and OSS.
We conclude that the agreement and reliability of the three shoulder questionnaires examined, WORC index, SPADI and OSS are acceptable and that differences between scores were small. The Norwegian version of the questionnaires is acceptable for assessing Norwegian-speaking patients with rotator cuff disease. The moderate agreement and construct validity should be taken into consideration when assessing follow-up results after treatment and in the planning of prospective studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18482438 View in PubMed
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An application of pain rating scales in geriatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196307
Source
Aging (Milano). 2000 Oct;12(5):380-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
I. Bergh
B. Sjöström
A. Odén
B. Steen
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. ingrid.bergh@geriatrik.gu.se
Source
Aging (Milano). 2000 Oct;12(5):380-7
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Geriatrics - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Pain - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pain Measurement - methods
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
This study examined the applicability of three different pain rating scales, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Graphic Rating Scale (GRS) and the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), in geriatric patients. Data collection was performed in a geriatric clinic at a university hospital. A structured interview was conducted with 167 patients (mean age = 80.5 years). Patients rated their current experience of pain twice with a 5-minute pause in-between on the VAS, GRS and NRS, and were then asked if they experienced pain, ache or hurt (PAH) or other symptoms. The correlations were high and significant both between the ratings of the VAS, GRS and NRS (r = 0.78-0.92; p
PubMed ID
11126525 View in PubMed
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An open-source, self-explanatory touch screen in routine care. Validity of filling in the Bath measures on Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Function Index, the Health Assessment Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales in comparison with paper versions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147317
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2010 Jan;49(1):99-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
David B Schefte
Merete L Hetland
Author Affiliation
The DANBIO Registry, Copenhagen University Hospital at Hvidovre, Kettegaard alle 30, 2650 Hvidovre, Denmark.
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2010 Jan;49(1):99-104
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement - methods
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Software
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - diagnosis
User-Computer Interface
Young Adult
Abstract
The Danish DANBIO registry has developed open-source software for touch screens in the waiting room. The objective was to assess the validity of outcomes from self-explanatory patient questionnaires on touch screen in comparison with the traditional paper form in routine clinical care.
Fifty-two AS patients and 59 RA patients completed Visual Analogue Scales (VASs) for pain, fatigue and global health, and Bath measures on Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Function Index (BASFI) (AS patients) or HAQs (RA patients) on touch screen and paper form in random order with a 1-h interval. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs), 95% CIs and smallest detectable differences (SDDs) were calculated.
ICC ranged from 0.922 to 0.988 (P
PubMed ID
19920097 View in PubMed
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[Anterior lumbar intercorporal spondylodesis. Radiological and functional therapeutic results]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46528
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Sep 12;156(37):5285-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-12-1994
Author
F B Christensen
B K Nielsen
E S Hansen
S. Pilgaard
C E Bünger
Author Affiliation
Arhus Kommunehospital, rygsektionen, ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling E.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Sep 12;156(37):5285-9
Date
Sep-12-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intervertebral Disk Displacement - diagnosis - psychology - surgery
Lumbar vertebrae - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement - methods
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Fusion - adverse effects - methods
Spondylolisthesis - diagnosis - psychology - surgery
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was to identify risk factors in relation to non-union following lumbar intercorporal spondylodesis and to correlate this result with the functional outcome as assessed by the Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ). This comprises questions concerning daily activities, work-leisure activities, anxiety-depression and social interest, measured on visual analog scales. During the period 1979-87 a total of 132 patients were operated with spondylodesis, diagnosed as suffering from spondylolisthesis or disc degeneration. Minimal follow-up was one year. Radiological graft incorporation was complete in 52% of the cases, partial in 24% and lacking in 24%. The rate of functional outcome follow-up was 72%. Seventy percent claimed an improvement in three out of four categories. Thirty percent claimed no improvement or worsened condition. The DPQ showed signs of poor prognosis for age groups above 45 (p
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Nov 21;156(47):7063-47817418
PubMed ID
7941067 View in PubMed
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Assessment and management of children's pain in community hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214158
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1995 Oct;22(4):638-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
S. Caty
J. Tourigny
I. Koren
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Laurentian University, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1995 Oct;22(4):638-45
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Decision Making
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Inservice training
Judgment
Narcotics - therapeutic use
Nonverbal Communication
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Ontario
Pain - drug therapy - nursing
Pain Management
Pain Measurement - methods
Pain, Postoperative - drug therapy
Parents
Social Support
Abstract
Registered nurses (n = 72) working in 10 paediatric units in community hospitals in north-eastern Ontario, Canada, participated in a descriptive study investigating how nurses assess and manage pain in children. A four-part questionnaire was used to collect the self-reported data. Twenty-five (36%) of the respondents defined pain as an individual and personal experience and another 25 (36%) respondents defined pain as a more or less localized sensation or discomfort resulting from the stimulation of specialized nerve endings. In response to three different clinical situations, the subjects' mean pain ratings were: 5.72 for an infant; 7.34 for a 3-year-old; and 7.29 for a 12-year-old child. The criterion 'nurses' judgment' was cited as being used frequently in both the assessment and decision making process; however, there was indication that some of the current knowledge in the assessment and management of pain in children was not known or being used.
PubMed ID
8708181 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of pain sensitivity in neonates with surgical pathology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101737
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2011 Jan-Feb;(1):50-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
N I Mel'nikova
E Iu Dzemeshko
I A Strogonov
V V Vorob'ev
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2011 Jan-Feb;(1):50-2
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, General
Hemodynamics - physiology
Humans
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - psychology - surgery
Pain Measurement - methods
Pain Threshold - physiology
Respiration, Artificial
Surgical Procedures, Operative - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Definition of pain in newborns with surgical pathology in the traditional way (change the child's behavior, skin color, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, body temperature, blood gas parameters) is subjective. The "Med-Storm" pain stress detector, manufactured by "Med-Storm Innovation AS" (Norway) allows the quantification of pain during and after surgery in infants. For a small sample, specificity was 76%, sensitivity--89%. Important indicator was the peak skin conductance. The change in the area under the curve was less often, but indicated the need of analgesia dose change.
PubMed ID
21513070 View in PubMed
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Assessments of pain in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: a retrospective population-based registry study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284103
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2017 Aug;59(8):858-863
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Lena Westbom
Amanda Rimstedt
Eva Nordmark
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2017 Aug;59(8):858-863
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cerebral Palsy - classification - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Pain Measurement - methods
Prevalence
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore pain screening in CPUP, a follow-up surveillance programme for people with cerebral palsy (CP), specifically to describe reported pain prevalence, localizations, patterns of distribution; to compare with studies using psychometrically sound assessment instruments; and to assess agreement between pain documented in CPUP and medical records.
Registry study of a population with CP, born 1993 to 2008, living in Skåne, Sweden in 2013. Descriptive data, cross-tabulations, and chi-square tests to characterize and compare the study groups. Kappa analysis to test the concordance between register and medical record reports on pain.
Pain was reported by 185 out of 497 children (37%; females 40%, males 35%). Level V in both Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) was associated with highest prevalence of pain (50% and 54%), and level I with lowest prevalence of pain (30% and 32%). Pain was most frequent in dyskinetic CP (46%) and least frequent in unilateral spastic CP (33%). Feet and knees were the dominant localizations. Fair-moderate agreement (kappa 0.37, prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa [PABAK] 0.44) was found between documented pain in CPUP and medical records, although more seldom recognized in medical records.
The distribution of pain between CP subtypes, functional levels, sex, and age in CPUP is concordant with previous population-based studies, indicating the validity of the CPUP pain screening. Despite this, further clinical evaluation with extended pain assessments and pain management were largely neglected in children reporting chronic pain.
PubMed ID
28509356 View in PubMed
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The association between a lifetime history of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and future neck pain: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144991
Source
Eur Spine J. 2010 Jun;19(6):972-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Paul S Nolet
Pierre Côté
J David Cassidy
Linda J Carroll
Author Affiliation
Centre of Research Expertise in Improved Disability Outcomes, University Health Network Rehabilitation Solutions, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Canada. pnolet@rogers.com
Source
Eur Spine J. 2010 Jun;19(6):972-81
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Injuries - epidemiology - physiopathology
Neck Pain - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pain Measurement - methods
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Time
Abstract
The objective of this population-based cohort study was to investigate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury from a motor vehicle collision and the development of troublesome neck pain. The current evidence suggests that individuals with a history of neck injury in a traffic collision are more likely to experience future neck pain. However, these results may suffer from residual confounding. Therefore, there is a need to test this association in a large population-based cohort with adequate control of known confounders. We formed a cohort of 919 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild neck pain in September 1995. At baseline, participants were asked if they ever injured their neck in a motor vehicle collision. Six and twelve months later, we asked about the presence of troublesome neck pain (grade II-IV) on the chronic pain grade questionnaire. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain while controlling for known confounders. The follow-up rate was 73.5% (676/919) at 6 months and 63.1% (580/919) at 1 year. We found a positive association between a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain after controlling for bodily pain and body mass index (adjusted HRR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.12-4.10). Our analysis suggests that a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision is a risk factor for developing future troublesome neck pain. The consequences of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision can have long lasting effects and predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of neck pain.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20213298 View in PubMed
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The association between gender, coping style and whiplash related symptoms in sufferers of whiplash associated disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165458
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Feb;48(1):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Allan Jones
Ask Elklit
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Aarhus, Denmark. allanj@psy.au.dk
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Feb;48(1):75-80
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adult
Denmark
Emotions - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Pain - psychology
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Whiplash Injuries - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine specifically whether the relationship between coping style and symptoms of whiplash injury change as a function of gender. A total of 1709 sufferers of whiplash associated disorder (1349 women, 360 men) belonging to the Danish Society for Polio, Traffic and Accident Victims completed questionnaires measuring demographic and psychological factors (including coping style), and symptoms of whiplash trauma (including pain). Men and women were not found to differ significantly in their use of coping strategies, however emotion focused coping strategies were related significantly more strongly to whiplash related symptoms in men compared to women. Women were found to display more symptoms related to whiplash injury compared to men. Possible reasons for the present findings are discussed in light of related research indicating mood as a potential moderating variable in the relationship between maladaptive coping style and degree of symptoms related to injury in men.
PubMed ID
17257372 View in PubMed
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Associations between biopsychosocial factors and chronic upper limb pain among slaughterhouse workers: cross sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277294
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2016 Feb 27;17:104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-27-2016
Author
Emil Sundstrup
Markus D Jakobsen
Mikkel Brandt
Kenneth Jay
Per Aagaard
Lars L Andersen
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2016 Feb 27;17:104
Date
Feb-27-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Adult
Chronic Pain - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pain Measurement - methods - psychology
Psychology
Upper Extremity - pathology
Abstract
Knowledge of factors associated with chronic pain is necessary for preventive strategies. The present study investigates biopsychosocial differences, with specific focus on rate of force development (RFD) and work ability, between workers with and without chronic upper limb pain.
Eighty-two male slaughterhouse workers, 49 with chronic upper limb pain and 33 pain-free controls participated in the study. Maximal muscle strength, RFD, and muscle activity was determined from fast and forceful maximal voluntary contractions for the shoulder and hand. Participants filled out a questionnaire on work ability (work ability index), work disability (Work module of DASH questionnaire), fear avoidance, and self-rated health. Additionally, pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured in muscles of the arm, shoulder and lower leg.
Muscle strength and RFD (determined within time intervals of 30, 50, 100, and 200 ms relative to onset of contraction) was 28 % and 58-78 % lower, respectively, in workers with chronic pain compared with pain-free controls, and paralleled by reduced muscle activity (all p 0.4).
Chronic upper limb pain was paralleled by reduced neuromuscular function of the shoulder and hand along with impaired work ability, work disability and general health. Future studies on chronic pain management at the workplace should carefully consider the biopsychosocial nature of pain when designing and implementing preventive strategies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26919829 View in PubMed
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257 records – page 1 of 26.