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247 records – page 1 of 25.

[A bowed back will become straight and the Winter's back will become bowed].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192223
Source
Duodecim. 1998;114(23):2498-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
H. Alaranta
Author Affiliation
Invalidiliiton Käpylän kuntoutuskeskus, Koskelantie 22, 00160 Helsinki. hannu.alaranta@invalidiliitto.fi
Source
Duodecim. 1998;114(23):2498-501
Date
1998
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back
Back Pain - psychology
Finland
Humans
Language
Symbolism
PubMed ID
11757151 View in PubMed
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Accounts of pain experience in an elderly care context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146404
Source
Commun Med. 2010;7(1):55-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ulla Hellström Muhli
Author Affiliation
School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Sweden.
Source
Commun Med. 2010;7(1):55-64
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Narration
Pain - psychology
Pain Measurement
Professional-Patient Relations
Psycholinguistics
Qualitative Research
Sociometric Techniques
Sweden
Abstract
This article aims to show how a discourse and communication based approach in the context of the care of the elderly provides a basis for reflecting on pain. Based on six hours of data from talk encounters between care professionals and elderly clients, an activity analysis of institutional settings and categorization of interactional discourse was undertaken. The focus was: (a) how elderly people initiated painful accounts, and (b) how the professionals oriented to such accounts. It is found that pain-talks are governed by the institutional practice of different phases:framing; mapping troubles and symptoms; clients' self presentations; counseling, and concluding. This phase structure exemplifies knowledge of communicative activities and is part of practical knowledge which the party, or at least the professional, is expected to become acquainted with. A thematic interactional map of critical moments related to pain as (a) social death and hope, and (b) presentation of self as past and self as present emerges. The caring aspect is to support hope and to change the focus from social death to life and recovering. In foregrounding health, it is important for the elderly people to affirm their identity of themselves as being good and honest persons.
PubMed ID
21462857 View in PubMed
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Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91600
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2008 Oct;16(4):233-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Forslund Kerstin
Quell Robin
Sørlie Venke
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Orebro University, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden. kerstin.forslund@oru.se
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2008 Oct;16(4):233-40
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chest Pain - psychology
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Change Events
Loneliness
Male
Middle Aged
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation.
PubMed ID
18929341 View in PubMed
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Agency orientation and chronic musculoskeletal pain: effects of a group learning program based on the personal construct theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72029
Source
Clin J Pain. 2000 Dec;16(4):281-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
L. Haugli
E. Steen
E. Laerum
A. Finset
R. Nygaard
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, University of Oslo, Norway. liv.haugli@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
Clin J Pain. 2000 Dec;16(4):281-9
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - psychology - rehabilitation - therapy
Pain - psychology - rehabilitation - therapy
Patient Education - organization & administration
Patient satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Program Evaluation
Psychological Theory
Psychotherapy, Group - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effects of a group learning program on patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and high absenteeism and investigates what characterizes those patients who may benefit from such a program. The learning program was based on personal construct theory. The theory included the following: (1) participation in an educational program is related to a favorable outcome across the outcome measures (pain, pain coping, management of daily life, absenteeism, and use of health care), (2) patients with high agency orientation (i.e., inner-directed) cope with their pain and manage daily life in a better manner than do patients with low agency orientation (i.e., outer-directed), and (3) patients with high personal control, measured in terms of agency orientation, in terms of health locus of control, or in both terms, will benefit more from the educational program than will patients with low personal control. DESIGN: The study was a randomized controlled study. PATIENTS: One hundred and sixteen patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and high absenteeism answered a questionnaire before and after the intervention program. The intervention group (n = 61) consisted of nine subgroups geographically spread through the eastern part of Norway and met for four hours every 2 weeks from February 1997 to October 1997. A total of 12 meetings were held. RESULTS: The intervention group reported a significantly higher score for the variable "management of everyday life" (p
PubMed ID
11153782 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the perceived oral treatment need using Andersen's behavioural model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108427
Source
Community Dent Health. 2013 Jun;30(2):102-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
N. Lundegren
B. Axtelius
P-E Isberg
S. Akerman
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnostics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmd University, Sweden. nina.lundegren@mah.se
Source
Community Dent Health. 2013 Jun;30(2):102-7
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Dental Care - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Educational Status
Female
Financing, Personal
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Needs Assessment
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Pain - psychology
Self Report
Sex Factors
Social Class
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of specific components of Andersen's behavioural model on adult individuals' perceived oral treatment need.
A questionnaire was sent to a randomly selected sample of 9,690 individuals, 20 to 89 years old, living in Skåne, Sweden. The 58 questions, some with follow-up questions, were answered by 6,123 individuals; a 63% response rate. Selected for inclusion in the multivariate logistic regression analysis were those questions relating to Andersen's behavioural model, phase five. Responses to "How do you rate your oral treatment need today?" were used as a dependent variable. The 62 questions chosen as independent variables represented the components: individual characteristics, health behaviour and outcomes in the model.
Of the independent variables, 24 were significant at the p
PubMed ID
23888540 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of low back-pain-related content in Canadian newspaper media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157684
Source
J Spinal Disord Tech. 2008 Feb;21(1):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Douglas P Gross
Jasmine Field
Kurt Shanski
Robert Ferrari
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada. dgross@ualberta.ca
Source
J Spinal Disord Tech. 2008 Feb;21(1):1-3
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Attitude to Health
Bed Rest
Canada
Culture
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Low Back Pain - psychology - therapy
Mass Media - statistics & numerical data - trends
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data - trends
Patient Education as Topic
Rest - psychology
Abstract
Review of newspaper articles.
To assess the content of newspaper articles in 2 provinces in Canada to determine if rest or avoidance of activity is being recommended for back pain.
Inaccurate back pain beliefs in the general public may arise due to messages in the mass media. One persisting belief in Canada is that rest or activity avoidance is needed until back pain resolves.
We searched newspapers in 2 Canadian provinces via an electronic database for articles discussing back pain. Two trained raters used an article review template to indicate whether the article's main recommendation was to stay active, rest, was neutral (indicating a balance between rest and activity), or did not provide advice on level of activity during an episode of back pain.
One hundred 29 articles were identified. The primary advice provided related to level of activity during an episode of back pain was stay active in 24% of articles, whereas no articles primarily recommended rest or avoidance of activity. Sixteen percent of articles were rated as neutral, indicating the authors suggested a balance between rest and activity.
Back-pain-related newspaper articles do not carry messages that advocate rest or avoidance of activity, but rather highlight the importance of staying active during an episode or participating in exercise.
PubMed ID
18418128 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and health-related quality of life in patients awaiting elective coronary angiography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179209
Source
Heart Lung. 2004 Jul-Aug;33(4):237-48
Publication Type
Article
Author
Wynne J De Jong-Watt
Heather M Arthur
Author Affiliation
Roge Valley Health System, Centenary Health Center Site and Cardiac Care Network of Ontario, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Heart Lung. 2004 Jul-Aug;33(4):237-48
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Angina Pectoris - psychology - radiography
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Canada
Chest Pain - psychology - radiography
Coronary Angiography - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Severity of Illness Index
Sickness Impact Profile
Uncertainty
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to document the impact of waiting for first-time elective coronary angiography (CA) on patients' anxiety and health-related quality of life (HRQL).
A prospective, observational inception cohort pretest and posttest design was used.
The study was conducted in a tertiary community cardiac center in Toronto, Canada.
Disease-specific HRQL was measured using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire at baseline (Time 1 [T1]) and 1 week before CA (Time 2 [T2]). The association between time on the waiting list and subjects' perceived anxiety was analyzed.
Paired-sample t tests comparing mean anxiety levels at T1 and T2 indicated a statistically significant increase in anxiety levels at T2 that did not seem to be related to the waiting time for CA (P =.000). Comparison of mean Seattle Angina Questionnaire scores at T1 and T2 indicated a trend toward deterioration in HRQL over time.
Waiting for elective CA may have a negative impact on patients' psychologic status and HRQL. Nursing and clinical interventions to reduce anxiety and improve HRQL are indicated for this population.
PubMed ID
15252414 View in PubMed
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Appraisal and coping processes among chronic low back pain patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70480
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Dec;19(4):396-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Hillevi Busch
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Stockholm, Sweden. hbh@psychology.su.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Dec;19(4):396-402
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Chronic Disease
Defense Mechanisms
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Low Back Pain - psychology - rehabilitation
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Appraisals and coping play important roles in musculoskeletal disorders, but how these aspects develop over time remains unknown. The aim of the current study was to examine the development of pain-related appraisals, coping and well behaviours among chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. METHODS: Twenty-two outpatients (15 women, 7 men) of working age were interviewed about past and present experiences of CLBP. The interviews were analysed using Grounded theory. RESULTS: The majority of the participants used disregarding processes in response to CLBP. The disregarding process developed from a psychological defence into a conscious coping strategy, the transition mediated by a crisis. This defence seemed to protect the participants' self-concept and reduce emotional discomfort, although it did not promote rehabilitation. The disregarding strategy was usually employed in later phases of the disorder and was consistent with active attempts at changing pain-related behaviours. Study limitation: Most of the participants had experienced CLBP for several years, thus the risk of memory bias cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, the sample was composed of relatively healthy subjects, thus the findings may not apply to chronic low back patients in general. CONCLUSION: Acceptance of CLBP favoured rehabilitation and helped participants change pain-related behaviours.
PubMed ID
16324065 View in PubMed
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Aspects of reliability and validity of the Swedish version of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale for older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106941
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2014 Feb;30(2):131-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Elisabeth Rydwik
Frida Hovmöller
Carina Boström
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit, Jakobsberg's Hospital, Stockholm City Council , Järfälla , Sweden and.
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2014 Feb;30(2):131-7
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - psychology
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Male
Motivation
Pain - psychology
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to test aspects of reliability and validity of a Swedish version of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale (SEE-SV) for older people. Floor and ceiling effects, item-total correlation, internal consistency, test--retest reliability, content and construct validity were tested on 39 older people, mean age 72 years (SD 3.3). Content validity was also tested on five physical therapists. The results showed no floor and ceiling effects. The ICC for the total score was 0.79 (95% CI 0.61-0.89). The median weighted kappa coefficients square for the individual items was 0.63. Item-to-total correlation varied between 0.64 and 0.86 and Cronbach's Alpha for all items was >0.92. The correlations between SEE-SV and the SF-36 Mental Health and Bodily Pain subscales were r(s)?=?0.50 and r(s)?=?0.30 (ns), respectively. The correlation between SEE-SV and self-assessed physical activity was r(s)?=?0.13 (ns). Eighty-nine percent responded that the items were relevant and 92% that no item should be excluded. All physical therapists considered the items relevant, but the written instructions could be improved. In conclusion, SEE-SV has good item-to-total correlation, satisfactory internal consistence and substantial test--retest reliability. Our results show satisfactory content validity; however, studies are needed to further evaluate construct validity and to evaluate other aspects such as predicitve validity and responsiveness.
PubMed ID
24083621 View in PubMed
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Assessment and further development of RDC/TMD Axis II biobehavioural instruments: a research programme progress report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141617
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2010 Oct;37(10):784-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
R. Ohrbach
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA. ohrbach@buffalo.edu
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2010 Oct;37(10):784-98
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bruxism - psychology
Checklist
Congresses as topic
Consensus
Depression - diagnosis
Facial Pain - psychology
Humans
Ontario
Pain Measurement
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis
Range of Motion, Articular
Reference Standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sickness Impact Profile
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
A symposium was held in Toronto, 2008, in which research progress regarding the biobehavioural dimension of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) was presented. An extended workshop was held in April 2009 in which further recommendations were made from an expert panel, using the 2008 symposium material as a base. This paper is a summary of the 2008 symposium proceedings with elaborations based on further developments. Seven studies were conducted between 2001 and 2008, in which the following were investigated: (i) basic properties of Axis II instruments, (ii) reliability and criterion validity of Axis II instruments, (iii) expansion of predictors, (iv) metric equivalence of the depression and non-specific physical symptoms subscales in the RDC/TMD, (v) laboratory investigation of oral behaviours, (vi) field data collection of oral behaviours, and (vii) functional limitation of the jaw. Methods and results for each of these studies are described. Based on the results of these studies that have been published, as well as the direction of interim results from the few studies that await completion and publication, the biobehavioural domain of the RDC/TMD, as published in 1992, is reliable and valid. These results also provide strong evidence supporting the future growth of the biobehavioural domain as the RDC/TMD matures into subsequent protocols for both clinical and research applications.
PubMed ID
20701668 View in PubMed
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247 records – page 1 of 25.