Skip header and navigation

Refine By

35 records – page 1 of 4.

Adverse childhood experiences influence development of pain during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266646
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Aug;94(8):840-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Jennifer Drevin
Jenny Stern
Eva-Maria Annerbäck
Magnus Peterson
Stephen Butler
Tanja Tydén
Anna Berglund
Margareta Larsson
Per Kristiansson
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Aug;94(8):840-6
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and pain with onset during pregnancy.
Cross-sectional study.
Eighteen antenatal clinics in southern Mid-Sweden.
Of 293 women invited to participate, 232 (79%) women agreed to participate in early pregnancy and were assessed in late pregnancy.
Questionnaires were distributed in early and late pregnancy. The questionnaires sought information on socio-demography, ACE, pain location by pain drawing and pain intensity by visual analogue scales. Distribution of pain was coded in 41 predetermined areas.
Pain in third trimester with onset during present pregnancy: intensity, location and number of pain locations.
In late pregnancy, 62% of the women reported any ACE and 72% reported any pain location with onset during the present pregnancy. Among women reporting any ACE the median pain intensity was higher compared with women without such an experience (p = 0.01). The accumulated ACE displayed a positive association with the number of reported pain locations in late pregnancy (rs = 0.19, p = 0.02). This association remained significant after adjusting for background factors in multiple regression analysis (p = 0.01). When ACE was dichotomized the prevalence of pain did not differ between women with and without ACE. The subgroup of women reporting physical abuse as a child reported a higher prevalence of sacral and pelvic pain (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.02, respectively).
Adverse childhood experiences were associated with higher pain intensities and larger pain distributions in late pregnancy, which are risk factors for transition to chronic pain postpartum.
PubMed ID
25965273 View in PubMed
Less detail

An epidemiologic study of MRI and low back pain in 13-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29799
Source
Spine. 2005 Apr 1;30(7):798-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2005
Author
Per Kjaer
Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde
Joan Solgaard Sorensen
Tom Bendix
Author Affiliation
The Back Research Center, Backcenter Funen and University of Southern Denmark, Lindevej, Denmark. pkrj@shf.fyns-amt.dk
Source
Spine. 2005 Apr 1;30(7):798-806
Date
Apr-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study of a general population. OBJECTIVE: To describe associations between "abnormal" lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and low back pain (LBP) in 13-year old children. SUMMARY AND BACKGROUND DATA: Very little is known about the distribution of lumbar MRI findings and how they are associated with LBP in youngsters. METHODS: Disc abnormalities, as well as nerve root compromise, endplate changes, and anterolisthesis were identified from MRI studies of 439 children. LBP was identified from structured interviews. Associations are presented as odds ratios (OR). RESULTS: Signs of disc degeneration were noted in approximately 1/3 of the subjects. Reduced signal intensity and irregular nucleus shape in the upper 3 lumbar discs were significantly associated with LBP within the last month (OR, 2.5-3.6), whereas reduced signal intensity and disc protrusion at L5-NS1 were associated with seeking care (OR, 2.8 and 7.7, respectively). Endplate changes in relation to the L3 discs were associated with LBP month and seeking care (OR, between 9.7 and 22.2). Anterolisthesis at L5 was associated with seeking care (OR, 4.3). There were obvious differences between genders: degenerative disc changes in the upper lumbar spine were more strongly associated with LBP in boys, while disc abnormalities in the lower lumbar spine were more strongly associated with seeking care in girls. CONCLUSIONS: In children, degenerative disc findings are relatively common, and some are associated with LBP. There appears to be a gender difference. Disc protrusions, endplate changes, and anterolisthesis in the lumbar spine were strongly associated with seeking care for LBP.
PubMed ID
15803084 View in PubMed
Less detail

Catastrophizing as a cognitive vulnerability factor related to depression in workers' compensation patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153523
Source
J Clin Psychol Med Settings. 2008 Sep;15(3):182-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Eun-Jeong Lee
Ming-Yi Wu
Gloria K Lee
Gladys Cheing
Fong Chan
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3105 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60616, USA. elee20@iit.edu
Source
J Clin Psychol Med Settings. 2008 Sep;15(3):182-92
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Workers' Compensation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the role of catastrophizing as a mediator and moderator between life stress and depression in a sample of workers' compensation patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Pain intensity, life stress (especially work and financial stress), and catastrophizing contributed significantly to depression. Catastrophizing was found to be partially mediating the relationship between life stress and depression and a moderator between social stress and depression. The results supported the role of catastrophizing as a cognitive vulnerability-stress factor related to depression in chronic pain patients. Screening for life stress and intervening early to prevent catastrophizing from occurring in the workers' compensation rehabilitation process may reduce psychosocial distress and enhance the overall effectiveness of rehabilitation programming for workers' compensation patients with chronic pain.
PubMed ID
19104963 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Chronic pain management in non-cancer patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141286
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2010 May-Jun;(3):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
O I Zagorul'ko
L A Medvedeva
A V Gnezdilov
V V Nikoda
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2010 May-Jun;(3):34-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Government Regulation
Humans
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Clinics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - trends
Pain Management
Quality of Life
Russia
Abstract
Chronic non-cancer pain management is an urgent global problem. To set up pain clinics is a promising and economically sound approach. There are pain clinics operating in Russia; however, there are no unified approaches to solving their organizational, therapeutic, and educational-and-methodological problems. An antipain care model is proposed for patients with chronic non-cancer pain, which makes it possible to optimize the treatment of the patients, to train pain specialists, and to enhance the economic efficiency of management.
PubMed ID
20737700 View in PubMed
Less detail

The co-occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and pain: is depression a mediator?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166822
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2006 Oct;19(5):747-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Joaquin Poundja
Deniz Fikretoglu
Alain Brunet
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology-Université de Montréal and Douglas Hospital Research Center, Montréal, Canada.
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2006 Oct;19(5):747-51
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Combat Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Statistics as Topic
Veterans - psychology
Abstract
Although recent studies suggest that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and pain may be related, the possible mediational role of depression in this relationship has not been examined. This study sought to examine this question in a sample of 130 male veterans seeking assessment or treatment for deployment-related PTSD. Results suggest that PTSD and pain are moderately related (r = .29) but that this relationship is fully mediated by depression. Our findings have important clinical implications: Treatment of PTSD and pain in veteran populations should include careful assessment and regular monitoring of depression.
PubMed ID
17075919 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do psychological and behavioral factors classified by the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (Swedish version) predict the early clinical course of low back pain in patients receiving chiropractic care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277299
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2016 Feb 12;17:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-2016
Author
Andreas Eklund
Gunnar Bergström
Lennart Bodin
Iben Axén
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2016 Feb 12;17:75
Date
Feb-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Early Diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Male
Manipulation, Chiropractic - psychology
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement - psychology
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate if psychological and behavioral factors (as determined by the Swedish version of the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory, MPI-S) can predict the early clinical course of Low Back Pain (LBP).
MPI-S data from patients (18-65 years of age) seeking chiropractic care for recurrent and persistent LBP were collected at the 1(st) visit. A follow-up questionnaire was administered at the 4(th) visit. The predictive value of the MPI-S subgroups Adaptive Copers (AC), Interpersonally Distressed (ID) and Dysfunctional (DYS) was calculated against the subjective improvement at the 4(th) visit and clinically relevant difference in pain intensity between the 1(st) and 4(th) visit.
Of the 666 subjects who were included at the 1(st) visit, 329 completed the questionnaire at the 4(th) visit. A total of 64.7 % (AC), 68.0 % (ID) and 71.3 % (DYS) reported a definite improvement. The chance of "definite improvement", expressed as relative risk (95 % CI) with the AC group as reference, was 1.05 (.87-1.27) for the ID and 1.10 (.93-1.31) for the DYS groups, respectively. The DYS and ID groups reported higher values in pain intensity both at the 1(st) and the 4(th) visit. The proportion of subjects who reported an improvement in pain intensity of 30 % or more (clinically relevant) were 63.5 % AC, 72.0 % ID and 63.2 % DYS. Expressed as relative risk (95 % CI) with the AC group as reference, this corresponded to 1.26 (.91-1.76) for the ID and 1.09 (.78-1.51) for the DYS groups, respectively.
The MPI-S instrument could not predict the early clinical course of recurrent and persistent LBP in this sample of chiropractic patients.
Clinical trials.gov; NCT01539863 , February 22, 2012.
Notes
Cites: Pain. 1998 Feb;74(2-3):247-569520239
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 1998 Jan;57(1):13-99536816
Cites: Clin J Pain. 1998 Sep;14(3):209-159758070
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 1999 Feb;37(2):167-829990748
Cites: Pain. 1999 Mar;80(1-2):113-910204723
Cites: Clin J Pain. 2005 Jan-Feb;21(1):44-55; discussion 69-7215599131
Cites: J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2005 Mar-Apr;28(3):153-815855901
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2005 Apr;76(2):275-8416097556
Cites: J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2005 Sep;28(7):472-816182020
Cites: Eur Spine J. 2006 Mar;15 Suppl 2:S169-9116550447
Cites: J Occup Rehabil. 2009 Mar;19(1):25-4019127345
Cites: BMJ. 2009;338:b180519502217
Cites: BMJ. 2009;339:b382919808766
Cites: Eur Spine J. 2010 Apr;19(4):533-919921522
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2010 Apr;14(4):426-3319683950
Cites: Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2010 Nov;21(4):659-7720977955
Cites: Pain. 2010 Dec;151(3):790-720932646
Cites: Pain. 2011 May;152(5):1044-5121306826
Cites: Eur Spine J. 2011 May;20(5):744-5221193932
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:8121521502
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2010 Dec;24(6):769-8121665125
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Oct 29;378(9802):1560-7121963002
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2012 Apr;26(2):263-8022794098
Cites: Pain. 2013 Aug;154(8):1237-4423664654
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2013 Oct;27(5):591-60024315141
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2013 Oct;27(5):601-1224315142
Cites: Trials. 2014;15:10224690201
Cites: Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2014 Apr;73(4):122-624765562
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2014 Jun;73(6):968-7424665116
Cites: Clin J Pain. 2015 Feb;31(2):123-3224681821
Cites: Phys Ther. 2015 Feb;95(2):e1-e1825639530
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2015;16:30626483193
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2000 Aug 15;25(16):2114-2510954644
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2000 Aug 1;25(15):1950-610908939
Cites: Man Ther. 2016 Feb;21:120-726144686
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2001 Jan;39(1):75-8711125725
Cites: Pain. 2001 Nov;94(2):149-5811690728
Cites: Clin J Pain. 2003 Mar-Apr;19(2):80-612616177
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2003 May;25(5):406-1112727037
Cites: Spine J. 2004 May-Jun;4(3):335-5615125860
Cites: J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2004 Oct;27(8):493-50215510092
Cites: Science. 1965 Nov 19;150(3699):971-95320816
Cites: Science. 1977 Apr 8;196(4286):129-36847460
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1980 May;137(5):535-447369396
Cites: Pain. 1985 Dec;23(4):345-564088697
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1988 Apr;56(2):233-83372831
Cites: Pain. 1990 Oct;43(1):27-352148974
Cites: Anesth Prog. 1990 Mar-Jun;37(2-3):155-602085195
Cites: Headache. 1991 Jul;31(7):476-91774166
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1995 Mar 15;20(6):722-87604349
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1996 Jul;23(7):1255-628823701
Cites: J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1997 Oct;20(8):507-109345678
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Apr 15;163(8):754-6116495468
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2007 Oct 2;147(7):478-9117909209
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2008 Jan 15;33(2):219-2318197110
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2008 May 15;59(5):632-4118438893
Cites: Pain Med. 2008 Jul-Aug;9(5):572-8018565009
PubMed ID
26867930 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do Work-Related Mechanical and Psychosocial Factors Contribute to the Social Gradient in Low Back Pain?: A 3-Year Follow-Up Study of the General Working Population in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281178
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2016 Jul 01;41(13):1089-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-01-2016
Author
Tom Sterud
Håkon A Johannessen
Tore Tynes
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2016 Jul 01;41(13):1089-95
Date
Jul-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Psychology
Random Allocation
Risk factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
A prospective cohort study.
The aim of the study was to investigate the extent to which work-related factors contribute to the social gradient in low back pain (LBP).
A social gradient in LBP is well established, but only a few studies have examined the extent to which exposure to mechanical and psychosocial work environment factors is a pathway for this gradient.
A randomly drawn cohort from the general population in Norway aged 18 to 66 years was followed up for 3 years (n?=?12,550, response rate at baseline?=?67%). Eligible respondents were in paid work during 2006 and 2009 (n?=?6819). Based on administrative register data respondents were coded into five educational levels (university/college =4 years was set as the reference group). Outcome of interest was self-reported moderate or severe LBP at follow-up adjusted for baseline LBP.
In total, 11.2% (397 individuals) men and 14.5% (461 individual) women reported LBP at follow-up. There was a strong social gradient ranging from 16.4% (elementary) to 6.4% (university/college =4 years). The corresponding figures among women were 22.4% and 7.5%. Corrected for age, LBP at baseline and working hours, educational level was a significant predictor of LBP at follow-up (odds ratios 1.8-2.3 in men and 1.7-3.1 in women). Adjusting for mechanical factors reduced the gradient by 39% to 43% in men and 28% to 34% in women. Adjusting for psychosocial factors reduced the gradient by 5% to 12% in men and increased the gradient by 7% to 11% in women.
Work-related mechanical factors contributed substantially to the social gradient in LBP among both men and women. The impact of psychosocial factors was modest among men and contributed to an increased gradient among women.
3.
PubMed ID
27340766 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Aug 28;128(16):1841-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-2008
Author
Linn-Heidi Lunde
Inger Hilde Nordhus
Ståle Pallesen
Rae Frances Bell
Author Affiliation
Smerteklinikken Haukeland Universitetssykehus 5021 Bergen. liheilu@hotmail.com
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Aug 28;128(16):1841-2
Date
Aug-28-2008
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Clinics
Pain Management
Risk factors
Abstract
Chronic pain is a serious and frequent health problem in elderly people. We have assessed main characteristics of chronic pain in elderly patients referred to a Norwegian multidisciplinary pain clinic.
Medical records were assessed for patients with chronic pain who were at least 60 years old (n = 48) and treated at the Pain clinic, Haukeland University hospital in 2004. Pain was assessed in relation to sociodemographic, somatic and psychosocial factors.
Pain in the lower extremities and various types of back pain were most frequently reported. Somatic and psychiatric comorbidity (including sleep disturbances) was prevalent.
The results confirm findings from a number of studies on main characteristics of chronic pain conditions in the elderly. It is important that regular general practitioners emphasize psychosocial factors when assessing and treating chronic pain in the elderly.
PubMed ID
18787596 View in PubMed
Less detail

Finnish version of the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia: Reference values in the Finnish general population and associations with leisure-time physical activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269899
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2015 Mar;47(3):249-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Petteri Koho
Katja Borodulin
Hannu Kautiainen
Urho Kujala
Timo Pohjolainen
Heikki Hurri
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2015 Mar;47(3):249-55
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Fear
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Leisure Activities
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - methods
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychometrics
Reference Values
Sex Characteristics
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To create reference values for the general Finnish population using the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK-FIN), to study gender differences in the TSK-FIN, to assess the internal consistency of the TSK-FIN, to estimate the prevalence of high levels of kinesiophobia in Finnish men and women, and to examine the association between kinesiophobia and leisure-time physical activity and the impact of co-morbidities on kinesiophobia.
The study population comprised 455 men and 579 women. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire about their socio-demographic factors, leisure-time physical activity, co-morbidities and kinesiophobia.
The mean TSK-FIN score was significantly higher for men (mean 34.2, standard deviation (SD) 6.9) compared with women (mean 32.9, SD 6.5), with an age-adjusted p?=?0.004 for the difference between men and women. Cronbach's alpha was 0.72, indicating substantial internal consistency. Men over 55 years of age and women over 65 years of age had a higher (p?
PubMed ID
25483309 View in PubMed
Less detail

Frequent pain in older people with and without diabetes - Finnish community based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294408
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 03 15; 18(1):73
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-15-2018
Author
M Karjalainen
J Saltevo
M Tiihonen
M Haanpää
H Kautiainen
P Mäntyselkä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, General Practice, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 03 15; 18(1):73
Date
03-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Male
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement - methods - psychology
Primary Health Care - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The association between pain and diabetes in older people has been largely unexplored. The aim of this survey was to analyze the prevalence and characteristics of pain among Finnish men and women 65 or older with and without diabetes in primary care.
All home-dwelling persons 65 years or older with diabetes (N?=?527) and age and gender matched controls (N?=?890) were identified from electronic patient records. Frequent pain was regarded as any pain experienced more often than once a week, and it was divided into pain experienced several times a week but not daily and pain experienced daily or continuously. The Numeric Rating Scale (0-10) (NRS) was used to assess the intensity and interference of the pain.
The number of subjects who returned the questionnaire was 1084 (76.5%). The prevalence of frequent pain in the preceding week was 50% among women without diabetes and 63% among women with diabetes (adjusted, p?=?0.22). In men, the corresponding proportions were 42% without diabetes and 47% with diabetes (adjusted, p?=?0.58). In both genders, depressive symptoms and the number of comorbidities were associated with pain experienced more often than once a week and with daily pain. Diabetes was not associated with pain intensity or pain interference in either women or men.
Pain in older adults is associated with depressive symptoms and the number of comorbidities more than with diabetes itself.
Notes
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 Feb;32(2):531-9 PMID 10694143
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 Jan;34(1):71-6 PMID 20929992
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Nov 12;290(18):2435-42 PMID 14612480
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2009 Feb;36(2):371-7 PMID 19012358
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):258-63 PMID 26647094
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1988 Jul 1;109 (1):18-24 PMID 3377350
Cites: Lancet. 2016 Apr 9;387(10027):1513-30 PMID 27061677
Cites: Ann Acad Med Singapore. 1994 Mar;23(2):129-38 PMID 8080219
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2012 Dec;27(12):1674-81 PMID 22854982
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2015 Nov 20;16:364 PMID 26589716
Cites: Diabet Med. 2010 May;27(5):578-84 PMID 20536955
Cites: Duodecim. 2016;132(9):881-2 PMID 27319085
Cites: Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2009 Jan;21(1):50-4 PMID 19077719
Cites: Pain. 2013 Dec;154(12):2649-57 PMID 24287107
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-804 PMID 8329970
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2005 Jul;32(7):1341-8 PMID 15996075
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2006 Jul;29(7):1518-22 PMID 16801572
Cites: Pain. 2008 Jul;137(1):34-40 PMID 17869422
Cites: Pain. 1998 Sep;77(3):231-9 PMID 9808348
Cites: BMJ Open. 2016 Jun 20;6(6):e010364 PMID 27324708
Cites: Muscles Ligaments Tendons J. 2016 May 19;6(1):26-34 PMID 27331029
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Sep 22;323(7314):662-5 PMID 11566829
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2006 Mar;29(3):725-31 PMID 16505540
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Jun 11;167(11):1137-44 PMID 17563021
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2012 Dec;35(12):2650-64 PMID 23100048
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Oct 15;61(10):1328-36 PMID 19790111
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 Oct;34(10 ):2220-4 PMID 21852677
PubMed ID
29544464 View in PubMed
Less detail

35 records – page 1 of 4.