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Air contaminants in a submarine equipped with air independent propulsion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166824
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Nov;8(11):1111-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Ola Persson
Christina Ostberg
Joakim Pagels
Aleksandra Sebastian
Author Affiliation
Division of Heat Transfer, Department of Heat and Power Engineering, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, 221 00, Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Nov;8(11):1111-21
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - standards
Carbon Dioxide - analysis - standards
Ecological Systems, Closed
Environmental Monitoring - standards
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Humans
Hydrogen - analysis - standards
Life Support Systems
Organic Chemicals - analysis - standards
Oxygen - analysis - standards
Ozone - analysis - standards
Pressure
Submarine Medicine
Sweden
Temperature
Volatilization
Abstract
The Swedish Navy has operated submarines equipped with air independent propulsion for two decades. This type of submarine can stay submerged for periods far longer than other non-nuclear submarines are capable of. The air quality during longer periods of submersion has so far not been thoroughly investigated. This study presents results for a number of air quality parameters obtained during more than one week of continuous submerged operation. The measured parameters are pressure, temperature, relative humidity, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter and microbiological contaminants. The measurements of airborne particles demonstrate that air pollutants typically occur at a low baseline level due to high air exchange rates and efficient air-cleaning devices. However, short-lived peaks with comparatively high concentrations occur, several of the sources for these have been identified. The concentrations of the pollutants measured in this study do not indicate a build-up of hazardous compounds during eight days of submersion. It is reasonable to assume that a substantial build-up of the investigated contaminants is not likely if the submersion period is prolonged several times, which is the case for modern submarines equipped with air independent propulsion.
PubMed ID
17075617 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian rural communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217580
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
B R Stern
M E Raizenne
R T Burnett
L. Jones
J. Kearney
C A Franklin
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Lung - physiology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sulfates - analysis
Abstract
This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1.0), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF25-75), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V50max). The 1986 annual mean of the 1-hr daily maxima of ozone was higher in Ontario (46.3 ppb) than in Saskatchewan (34.1 ppb), with 90th percentile concentrations of 80 ppb in Ontario and 47 ppb in Saskatchewan. Summertime 1-hr daily maxima means were 69.0 ppb in Ontario and 36.1 ppb in Saskatchewan. Annual mean and 90th percentile concentrations of inhalable sulfates were three times higher in Ontario than in Saskatchewan; there were no significant differences in levels of inhalable particles (PM10) or particulate nitrates. Levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were low in both regions. After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education, and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P 0.05).
PubMed ID
8055835 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and daily mortality in a city with low levels of pollution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187142
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Sverre Vedal
Michael Brauer
Richard White
John Petkau
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colorado, USA. vedals@njc.org
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):45-52
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - classification - poisoning
Air Pollution - adverse effects
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Carbon monoxide poisoning
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Cause of Death
Databases as Topic
Humans
Linear Models
Meteorological Concepts
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - poisoning
Ozone - analysis - poisoning
Particle Size
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Seasons
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis - poisoning
Urban health
Abstract
The concentration-response relationship between daily ambient inhalable particle (particulate matter less than or equal to 10 micro m; PM(10)) concentrations and daily mortality typically shows no evidence of a threshold concentration below which no relationship is observed. However, the power to assess a relationship at very low concentrations of PM(10) has been limited in studies to date. The concentrations of PM(10) and other air pollutants in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, from January 1994 through December 1996 were very low: the 50th and 90th percentiles of daily average PM(10) concentrations were 13 and 23 micro g/m(3), respectively, and 27 and 39 ppb, respectively, for 1-hr maximum ozone. Analyses of 3 years of daily pollution (PM(10), ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide) concentrations and mortality counts showed that the dominant associations were between ozone and total mortality and respiratory and cardiovascular mortality in the summer, and between nitrogen dioxide and total mortality in the winter, although some association with PM(10) may also have been present. We conclude that increases in low concentrations of air pollution are associated with increased daily mortality. These findings may support the notion that no threshold pollutant concentrations are present, but they also raise concern that these effects may not be effects of the measured pollutants themselves, but rather of some other factor(s) present in the air pollution-meteorology mix.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12515678 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for otitis media: a case-crossover study in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141881
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Nov;118(11):1631-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Roger Zemek
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Nov;118(11):1631-6
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Alberta
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Child, Preschool
Cross-Over Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant
Inhalation Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Odds Ratio
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - analysis
Risk factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Weather
Abstract
Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common early childhood infections, resulting in an enormous economic burden to the health care system through unscheduled doctor visits and antibiotic prescriptions.
The objective of this study was to investigate the potential association between ambient air pollution exposure and emergency department (ED) visits for OM.
Ten years of ED data were obtained from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and linked to levels of air pollution: carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter (PM) of median aerometric diameter
Notes
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PubMed ID
20663739 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Loft Steffen
Author Affiliation
Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Afdeling for Miljø og Sundhed, Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet, Øster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 København K, Denmark. s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Animals
Cattle
Climate
Greenhouse Effect
Health
Humans
Methane - analysis
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Pollen
Risk factors
World Health
Abstract
Air quality, health and climate change are closely connected. Ozone depends on temperature and the greenhouse gas methane from cattle and biomass. Pollen presence depends on temperature and CO2. The effect of climate change on particulate air pollution is complex, but the likely net effect is greater health risks. Reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions by reduced livestock production and use of combustion for energy production, transport and heating will also improve air quality. Energy savings in buildings and use of CO2 neutral fuels should not deteriorate indoor and outdoor air quality.
PubMed ID
19857393 View in PubMed
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Ambient ozone and emergency department visits for cellulitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138755
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 Nov;7(11):4078-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Eugeniusz Porada
Gilaad G Kaplan
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Population Studies Division, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9, Canada. mietek.szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 Nov;7(11):4078-88
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Cellulitis - etiology - therapy
Cross-Over Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Ozone - analysis
Seasons
Abstract
Objectives were to assess and estimate an association between exposure to ground-level ozone and emergency department (ED) visits for cellulitis. All ED visits for cellulitis in Edmonton, Canada, in the period April 1992-March 2002 (N = 69,547) were examined. Case-crossover design was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR, and 95% confidence interval) per one interquartile range (IQR) increase in ozone concentration (IQR = 14.0 ppb). Delay of ED visit relating to exposure was probed using 0- to 5-day exposure lags. For all patients in the all months (January-December) and lags 0 to 2 days, OR = 1.05 (1.02, 1.07). For male patients during the cold months (October-March): OR = 1.05 (1.02, 1.09) for lags 0 and 2 and OR = 1.06 (1.02, 1.10) for lag 3. For female patients in the warm months (April-September): OR = 1.12 (1.06, 1.18) for lags 1 and 2. Cellulitis developing on uncovered (more exposed) skin was analyzed separately, observed effects being stronger. Cellulitis may be associated with exposure to ambient ground level ozone; the exposure may facilitate cellulitis infection and aggravate acute symptoms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21139878 View in PubMed
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Ambient ozone concentrations and the risk of perforated and nonperforated appendicitis: a multicity case-crossover study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108785
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Aug;121(8):939-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Gilaad G Kaplan
Divine Tanyingoh
Elijah Dixon
Markey Johnson
Amanda J Wheeler
Robert P Myers
Stefania Bertazzon
Vineet Saini
Karen Madsen
Subrata Ghosh
Paul J Villeneuve
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Environmental Health Research Group, Institute of Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ggkaplan@ucalgary.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Aug;121(8):939-43
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Appendicitis - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cities
Cross-Over Studies
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Ozone - analysis - toxicity
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Young Adult
Abstract
Environmental determinants of appendicitis are poorly understood. Past work suggests that air pollution may increase the risk of appendicitis.
We investigated whether ambient ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations were associated with appendicitis and whether these associations varied between perforated and nonperforated appendicitis.
We based this time-stratified case-crossover study on 35,811 patients hospitalized with appendicitis from 2004 to 2008 in 12 Canadian cities. Data from a national network of fixed-site monitors were used to calculate daily maximum O3 concentrations for each city. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate city-specific odds ratios (ORs) relative to an interquartile range (IQR) increase in O3 adjusted for temperature and relative humidity. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to derive a pooled risk estimate. Stratified analyses were used to estimate associations separately for perforated and nonperforated appendicitis.
Overall, a 16-ppb increase in the 7-day cumulative average daily maximum O3 concentration was associated with all appendicitis cases across the 12 cities (pooled OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.13). The association was stronger among patients presenting with perforated appendicitis for the 7-day average (pooled OR = 1.22; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.36) when compared with the corresponding estimate for nonperforated appendicitis [7-day average (pooled OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.09)]. Heterogeneity was not statistically significant across cities for either perforated or nonperforated appendicitis (p > 0.20).
Higher levels of ambient O3 exposure may increase the risk of perforated appendicitis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23842601 View in PubMed
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Assessment of long-term exposure to air pollution in a longitudinal national health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142360
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;21(4):337-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mireille Guay
David M Stieb
Marc Smith-Doiron
Author Affiliation
Population Studies Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9.
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;21(4):337-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Child
Cities - epidemiology
Demography
Environmental Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Health Surveys
Humans
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-reported data on the municipality of residence were used to assess long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution from 1980 to 2002 in the longitudinal Canadian National Population Health Survey. Exposure to carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter was determined using data obtained from fixed-site air pollution monitors operated principally in urban areas. Four different methods of attributing pollution exposure were used based on residence in (1) 1980, (2) 1994, (3) 1980 and 1994, and (4) at all locations between 1980 and 2002. Between 1,693 and 4,274 of 10,515 members of the cohort could be assigned exposures to individual pollutants using these methods. On average, subjects spent 71.4% of the 1980-2002 period in the census subdivision where they lived in 1980. A single exposure measure in 1980 or 1994 or a mean of the two measures was highly correlated (r>0.7, P
PubMed ID
20606704 View in PubMed
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Assessment of ozone exposures in the greater metropolitan Toronto area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215440
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 1995 Apr;45(4):223-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
L J Liu
P. Koutrakis
J. Leech
I. Broder
Author Affiliation
Harvard University, School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 1995 Apr;45(4):223-34
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Ozone - analysis
Abstract
An ozone (O3) exposure assessment study was conducted in Toronto, Ontario, Canada during the winter and summer of 1992. A new passive O3 sampler developed by Harvard was used to measure indoor, outdoor, and personal O3 concentrations. Measurements were taken weekly and daily during the winter and summer, respectively. Indoor samples were collected at a total of 50 homes and workplaces of study participants. Outdoor O3 concentrations were measured both at home sites using the passive sampler and at 20 ambient monitoring sites with continuous monitors. Personal O3 measurements were collected from 123 participants, who also completed detailed time-activity diaries. A total of 2,274 O3 samples were collected. In addition, weekly air exchange rates of homes were measured.
PubMed ID
7743405 View in PubMed
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58 records – page 1 of 6.