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Comparative sweating rates of Eskimos and Caucasians under controlled conditions. [Abstract]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2125
Source
Pages 69-70 in Science in Alaska, 1955. Proceedings, 6th Alaskan Science Conference.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1955
Author
Rodahl, K.
Rennie, D.W.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory
Source
Pages 69-70 in Science in Alaska, 1955. Proceedings, 6th Alaskan Science Conference.
Date
1955
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Basal metabolic rate
Sweating
Oxygen consumption
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 979.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 203.
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Physical fitness in terms of maximal oxygen intake of nomadic Lapps.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298661
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-53. 32 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
. Physical fitness in terms of aerobic working capacity wa.s measured in nomadic Lapps living in the northern I m. part of the Scandinavian peninsula. Forty-nine men between 10 and SS years of age and Zl girls were studied. I IV. Aerobic capacity was determined by measuring oxygen consumption during
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, K.L.
Elsner, R.E.
Saltin, B.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Work Physiology, Oslo, Norway
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-53. 32 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2250845
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Lapps (Sami)
Physical Fitness
Oxygen consumption
Abstract
Physical fitness in terms of aerobic working capacity was measured in nomadic Lapps living in the northern part of the Scandinavian peninsula. Forty-nine men between 10 and 55 years of age and 21 girls were studied. Aerobic capacity was determined by measuring oxygen consumption during exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Two or three submaximal loads were used. The maximal work lasted three to four minutes, during which time the subjects worked as hard as they could. Blood lactate taken after this heavy run showed that the oxygen requirement exceeded oxygen intake, thus indicating that maximal values for oxygen intake were achieved during this type of exercise.
The values for maximal oxygen intake of nomadic Lapps increased steadily from the age of 10 up to 18 years, from an average of 1. 4 liters/minute to about 3. 5 liters/minute . The latter value remained essentially unchanged up to the age of 30 in men. Maximum oxygen consumption then decreased to about 2. 5 liters/minute at. 50 years of age. No sex differences in maximum oxygen consumption were noted in subjects below 15 years of age.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-53
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Seasonal variations in respiratory system in healthy inhabitants of west Siberia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102311
Source
Pages 334-338 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
temperature +20"C), autumn (+2°C), winter (- l 8°C), and spring ( + 5°C) under the same conditions in a room at rest. Oxyspirography, pnemnotachography and the helium dilu- tion method were used. Oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), breathing frequency, vital capacity (VC) and inspiratory capacity were adjusted
  1 document  
Author
Gultyaeva, V.V
Shishkin, G.S
Grishin, O.V
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Functional Morphology of Lung, State Research Institute of Physiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Siberian Branch, Novosibirsk
Source
Pages 334-338 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Lung volumes
Oxygen consumption
Seasonal changes
Ventilation
Abstract
The aim of this work was to investigate seasonal variations in oxygen consumption, ventilation, lung volumes and their relationships in healthy adult inhabitants of West Siberia. The investigations were performed in Novosibirsk. Thirty healthy male adult volunteers were studied 4 times during a year: in summer (mean monthly temperature +20°C), autumn (+2°C), winter (-18°C), and spring (+ 5°C) under the same conditions in a room at rest. Oxyspirography, pneumotachography and the helium dilution method were used. Oxygen consumption (VO2), breathing frequency, vital capacity (VC), and inspiratory capacity were adjusted to be the same during the year. Minute ventilation (Ve), VO2,/Ve ratio, residual volume (RV), and expiratory reserve volume (ERV) to RV ratio had dynamics concurrent with seasonal temperature dynamics. Tidal volume, ERV, functional residual capacity, forced 1-s expired volume (FEV1), and FEV1/ VC also changed, but their dynamics were different from the previous parameters. The minimum value of these parameters was found in the spring and the maximum in the autumn, or summer and autumn. Correlations between respiratory parameters also changed during the year. We conclude that oxygen consumption is provided by reorganization of pulmonary tissue in winter.
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Comparison of response to cold in Eskimos with those of Caucasians, Alakulufe Indians, and Australian aborgines. [Abstract]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1053
Source
Page 51 in U.S. Army Medical Research Laboratory. Report 474. Fort Knox, KY.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1961
Author
Hart, J.S.
Author Affiliation
National Research Council of Canada
Source
Page 51 in U.S. Army Medical Research Laboratory. Report 474. Fort Knox, KY.
Date
1961
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Pangnirtung
Basal metabolic rate
Oxygen consumption
Skin temperature
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1021.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 296.
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Physical, physiological and performance differences between Canadian national team and universiade volleyball players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224025
Source
J Sports Sci. 1992 Apr;10(2):131-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
D J Smith
D. Roberts
B. Watson
Author Affiliation
Human Performance Laboratory, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Sports Sci. 1992 Apr;10(2):131-8
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Canada
Exercise
Humans
Male
Oxygen consumption
Sports
Abstract
Volleyball has been described as an 'interval' sport with both anaerobic and aerobic components. At the higher skill levels, technical performance may be limited by physical characteristics as well as physical fitness, and performance characteristics such as speed and vertical jump. This investigation compared teams at the two uppermost levels of men's volleyball in Canada for differences in physical, physiological and performance characteristics. The subjects were members of the national (n = 15) and universiade teams (n = 24). The parameters examined included percent body fat, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max), anaerobic power, bench press, 20-m sprint time and vertical jumping ability. The only significant difference in physical characteristics between the two teams was in age. Despite similarities in standing and reach height, the national team players had significantly higher block (3.27 vs 3.21 m) and spike (3.43 vs 3.39 m) jumps. An evaluation of anaerobic power measures produced similar power outputs during a modified Wingate test, yet the national team members had higher scores (P less than 0.05) for spike and block jump differences as well as 20-m sprint time. The large aerobic component of elite volleyball play was supported by the high VO2 max value recorded for the national team players (56.7 vs 50.3 ml kg-1 min-1). The results suggest that either years of specific physical conditioning and playing or the selection of individuals for the national team who possess more desirable characteristics as a consequence of genetic endowment, plays a significant role in the preparation of international calibre volleyball players.
PubMed ID
1588683 View in PubMed
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Re: "A simple, valid step test for estimating maximal oxygen uptake in epidemiologic studies ".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237177
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Apr;123(4):757
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1986
Author
T. Stephens
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Apr;123(4):757
Date
Apr-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Oxygen consumption
Physical Exertion
PubMed ID
3953556 View in PubMed
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Effects of decerebration and decortication on shivering in the cat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298674
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-15. 17 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1962
appreciable rise in the oxygen consumption rate of chronic decerebrate c a t s I V. during rapid cooling. The intermittent somatomotor VI activity that was induced by rapid cooling was occasion- ally tremulous but i t was also evoked by rapid warming and was abs ent during s low cooling and warming. This
  1 document  
Author
Stuart, D.G.
Freeman, W.J.
Hemingway, A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-15. 17 p.
Date
September 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1801784
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Cats
Shivering
Cold Temperature
Brain
Oxygen consumption
Abstract
The effects of decerebration and decortication on the metabolic intensity of shivering in cats were determined. There was neither shivering nor an appreciable rise in the oxygen consumption rate of chronic decerebrate cats during rapid cooling. The intermittent somatomotor activity that was induced by rapid cooling was occasionally tremulous but it was also evoked by rapid warming and was absent during slow cooling and warming. This suggested that the motor activity of decerebrate cats during rapid cooling was more a generalized avoidance response to nociceptive stimulation than a temperature regulating mechanism. In decorticate cats shivering was depressed three days after surgery, the mean shivering to nonshivering ratio in oxygen consumption rate being 1.6 ± 0.12 (S. D. ), while the same ratio before operation was 2.6 ± 0.48 (S. D. ). One month after decortication shivering had returned to its pre-operative intensity. This suggested that the net telencephalic influences on shivering could hardly be suppresive, as suggested by some earlier investigators.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-15
Documents
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Source
Pages 136-147 in V.W. Bladen, ed. Canadian population and northern colonization. Symposium presented to the Royal Society of Canada in 1961. Studia Varia Series 7. University of Toronto Press.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1962
Author
Brown, G.M.
Source
Pages 136-147 in V.W. Bladen, ed. Canadian population and northern colonization. Symposium presented to the Royal Society of Canada in 1961. Studia Varia Series 7. University of Toronto Press.
Date
1962
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Cold adaptation
Peripheral circulation
Basal metabolic rate
Oxygen consumption
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1010.
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Activity patterns of the Canadian Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature945
Source
Pages 180-210 in International Biological Programme. Human Adaptability Project (Igloolik, N.W.T.). Physiology Section report 2. University of Toronto, Toronto. Anthropological Series 15.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973
Author
Godin, G.
Shephard, R.J.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Pages 180-210 in International Biological Programme. Human Adaptability Project (Igloolik, N.W.T.). Physiology Section report 2. University of Toronto, Toronto. Anthropological Series 15.
Date
1973
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Igloolik
Energy cost
Energy consumption
Oxygen consumption
Fitness
Nutrition
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1063.
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Activity patterns of the Canadian Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature946
Source
Pages 193-215 in O.G. Edholm and E.K.E. Gunderson, eds. Polar human biology. Proceedings of the SCAR/IUPS/IUBS Symposium on Human Biology and Medicine in the Antarctic. William Heinemann Medical Books Publication, Chicago, IL.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974
Author
Godin, G.
Shephard, R.J.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Pages 193-215 in O.G. Edholm and E.K.E. Gunderson, eds. Polar human biology. Proceedings of the SCAR/IUPS/IUBS Symposium on Human Biology and Medicine in the Antarctic. William Heinemann Medical Books Publication, Chicago, IL.
Date
1974
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Igloolik
Exercise testing
Energy cost
Oxygen consumption
Methodology
Fitness
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1065.
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676 records – page 1 of 68.