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145 records – page 1 of 15.

Abdominal obesity is associated with increased risk of acute coronary events in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190450
Source
Eur Heart J. 2002 May;23(9):706-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
H-M Lakka
T A Lakka
J. Tuomilehto
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General practice, Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 2002 May;23(9):706-13
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - blood supply - pathology
Acute Disease
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body constitution
Body mass index
Coronary Disease - blood - complications - epidemiology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - complications
Oxygen - blood
Risk factors
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to investigate the associations of abdominal obesity and overall obesity with the risk of acute coronary events.
Body mass index indicating overall obesity and waist-to-hip ratio and waist circumference indicating abdominal obesity were measured for 1346 Finnish men aged 42-60 years who had neither cardiovascular disease nor cancer at baseline. There were 123 acute coronary events during an average follow-up of 10.6 years. In Cox regression analyses adjusted for confounding factors, waist-to-hip ratio (P=0.009), waist circumference (P=0.010) and body mass index (P=0.013) as continuous variables were associated directly with the risk of coronary events. These associations were in part explained by blood pressure, diabetes, fasting serum insulin, serum lipids, plasma fibrinogen, and serum uric acid. Waist-to-hip ratio of > or =0.91 was associated with a nearly threefold risk of coronary events. Waist-to-hip ratio provided additional information beyond body mass index in predicting coronary heart disease, whereas body mass index did not add to the predictive value of waist-to-hip ratio. Abdominal obesity combined with smoking and poor cardiorespiratory fitness increased the risk of coronary events 5.5 and 5.1 times, respectively.
Abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease in middle-aged men and even more important than overall obesity. Since the effect of abdominal obesity was strongest in smoking and unfit men, the strategy for lifestyle modification to prevent coronary heart disease should address these issues jointly.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 2002 May;23(9):687-911977990
PubMed ID
11977996 View in PubMed
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[About the seven little devils who changed physiology. August and Marie Krogh on pulmonary gas exchange].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199676
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Dec 20;161(51):7112-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-1999

[Adaptation of children in the north and the oxygen regimen]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41481
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1979;(6):61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979

The adaptation of polar fishes to climatic changes: Structure, function and phylogeny of haemoglobin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86911
Source
IUBMB Life. 2008 Jan;60(1):29-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Verde Cinzia
Giordano Daniela
di Prisco Guido
Author Affiliation
Institute of Protein Biochemistry, CNR, Via Pietro Castellino 111, Naples, Italy.
Source
IUBMB Life. 2008 Jan;60(1):29-40
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Antarctic Regions
Antifreeze Proteins - genetics
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Evolution, Molecular
Fishes - physiology
Hemoglobins - chemistry - genetics - physiology
Oxygen - blood
Phylogeny
Abstract
In the Antarctic, fishes of dominant suborder Notothenioidei have evolved in a unique thermal scenario. Phylogenetically related taxa of the suborder live in a wide range of latitudes, in Antarctic, sub-Antarctic and temperate oceans. Consequently, they offer a remarkable opportunity to study the physiological and biochemical characters gained and, conversely, lost during their evolutionary history. The evolutionary perspective has also been pursued by comparative studies of some features of the heme protein devoted to O(2) transport in fish living in the other polar region, the Arctic. The two polar regions differ by age and isolation. Fish living in each habitat have undergone regional constraints and fit into different evolutionary histories. The aim of this contribution is to survey the current knowledge of molecular structure, functional features, phylogeny and adaptations of the haemoglobins of fish thriving in the Antarctic, sub-Antarctic and Arctic regions (with some excursions in the temperate latitudes), in search of insights into the convergent processes evolved in response to cooling. Current climate change may disturb adaptation, calling for strategies aimed at neutralising threats to biodiversity.
PubMed ID
18379990 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness influences the response of maximal oxygen uptake and lactate threshold in acute hypobaric hypoxia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50162
Source
Int J Sports Med. 1995 Feb;16(2):78-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
P. Koistinen
T. Takala
V. Martikkala
J. Leppäluoto
Author Affiliation
Health Centre Hospital of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Sports Med. 1995 Feb;16(2):78-81
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aerobiosis
Altitude
Anaerobic Threshold - physiology
Anoxia - blood - physiopathology
Exercise Test
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Hockey - physiology
Humans
Lactates - blood
Male
Oxygen - blood
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Respiration - physiology
Skiing - physiology
Ventilation-Perfusion Ratio
Abstract
We studied 12 highly trained athletes, 6 male ice-hockey players and 6 cross-country skiers (2 females, 4 males). All of them participated in a maximal electrically braked bicycle ergometer test in a hypobaric chamber at the simulated altitude of 3000m (520 mmHg) and in normobaric conditions two days apart in random order. The maximal oxygen uptake was 57.4 +/- 7.1 (SD) ml/kg/min in normobaria (VO2maxnorm) and 46.6 +/- 4.9 (SD) ml/kg/min in hypobaric hypoxia (VO2maxhyp). The decrease in maximal oxygen uptake (delta VO2max) at the simulated altitude of 3000m correlated significantly (p
PubMed ID
7751080 View in PubMed
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Aerobic power declines with aging in rat skeletal muscles perfused at matched convective O2 delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49786
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2003 Feb;94(2):744-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Russell T Hepple
Jason L Hagen
Daniel J Krause
Cory C Jackson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Kinesiology and Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4. hepple@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2003 Feb;94(2):744-51
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerobiosis
Aging - physiology
Animals
Biological Availability
Hindlimb
Muscle Contraction
Muscle, Skeletal - blood supply - metabolism - physiology
Oxidation-Reduction
Oxygen - blood
Oxygen consumption
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Although it is well established that maximal O(2) uptake (Vo(2 max)) declines from adulthood to old age, the role played by alterations in skeletal muscle is unclear. Specifically, because during whole body exercise reductions in convective O(2) delivery to the working muscles from adulthood to old age compromise aerobic performance, this obscures the influence of alterations within the skeletal muscles. We sought to overcome this limitation by using an in situ pump-perfused hindlimb preparation to permit matching of muscle convective O(2) delivery in young adult (8 mo; muscle convective O(2) delivery = 569 +/- 42 micromol O(2) x min(-1) x 100 g(-1)) and late middle-aged (28-30 mo; 539 +/- 62 micromol O(2) x min(-1) x 100 g(-1)) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats. The distal hindlimb muscles were electrically stimulated for 4 min (60 tetani/min), and Vo(2 max) was determined. Vo(2 max) normalized to the contracting muscle mass was 22% lower in the 28- to 30-mo-old (344 +/- 17 micromol O(2). min(-1) x 100 g(-1)) than the 8-mo-old (441 +/- 20 micromol O(2) x min(-1) x 100 g(-1); P
PubMed ID
12391069 View in PubMed
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[Age peculiarities of cardiorespiratory system reaction to hypoxia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82763
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(6):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Korkushko O V
Pysaruk A V
Lyshnevs'ka V Iu
Asanov E O
Chebotar'ov M D
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(6):11-7
Date
2005
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adult
Aged
Aging - blood - physiology
Anoxia - blood - physiopathology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Oxygen - blood
Respiratory Mechanics - physiology
Abstract
Age peculiarities of cardiorespiratory system reactions on isocapnic hypoxia (inhalation of gas mixture of 12% O2) have been investigated. It has been stated that breathing with hypoxic mixture resulted in more significant shift of O2 blood saturation, AP and autonomic balance in the elderly people (p
PubMed ID
16485848 View in PubMed
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Arctic adaptation in reindeer. The energy saving of a hemoglobin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230968
Source
FEBS Lett. 1989 Apr 10;247(1):135-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1989
Author
B. Giardina
O. Brix
M. Nuutinen
S. el Sherbini
A. Bardgard
G. Lazzarino
S G Condò
Author Affiliation
Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, II University of Rome, Italy.
Source
FEBS Lett. 1989 Apr 10;247(1):135-8
Date
Apr-10-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
2,3-Diphosphoglycerate
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Chlorides - blood
Cold Temperature
Diphosphoglyceric Acids - blood
Energy Metabolism
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Oxygen - blood
Protein Conformation
Reindeer - physiology
Temperature
Thermodynamics
Abstract
Previous results [(1988) Arct. Med. Res. 47, 83-88] have shown that hemoglobin from reindeer is characterized by a low overall heat of oxygenation. This particular aspect has been investigated further in a series of precise oxygen equilibrium experiments. The results obtained show a peculiar dependence of the temperature effect on the fractional saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen, which could be regarded as a very interesting case of molecular adaptation to extreme environmental conditions.
PubMed ID
2707444 View in PubMed
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Are patients on long-term oxygen therapy followed up properly? Data from the Danish Oxygen Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52350
Source
J Intern Med. 2001 Aug;250(2):131-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
T J Ringbaek
P. Lange
K. Viskum
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark. ringbaek@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Intern Med. 2001 Aug;250(2):131-6
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Female
Home Care Services - standards
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - blood - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Oximetry
Oxygen - blood - therapeutic use
Predictive value of tests
Quality of Health Care
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Therapy - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to assess the extent and quality of follow-up of patients on LTOT. SETTING: The Danish Oxygen Register. SUBJECTS: A total of 890 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients who were on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) during the period from 1 November 1994 to 31 August 1995. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The extent and quality of follow-up. RESULTS: Only 38.5% of the patients were followed up in the study period, and only 17.5% had a 'sufficient follow-up' defined as at least one follow-up visit within 10 months which included measurement of arterial blood gases or pulsoximetry with oxygen supply, verification that the patient used oxygen > or =15 h day-1 and was nonsmoker. Female gender, LTOT initiated 3-12 months ago, LTOT started by a chest physician at pulmonary department and LTOT prescribed > or =15 h day-1 were found to be significant predictors of 'sufficient follow-up' (odds ratio (OR): 1.7, 2.0, 3.7 and 1.9, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The extent and the quality of follow-up of patients on LTOT were poor, especially if a nonpulmonary physician initiated LTOT. We recommend that more attention should be paid on proper monitoring of LTOT, and that only chest physicians should be able to prescribe and re-evaluate LTOT.
PubMed ID
11489062 View in PubMed
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145 records – page 1 of 15.