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Abundance of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC2 is increased by high-fat feeding in Fischer 344 X Brown Norway (F1) rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90141
Source
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2009 Apr;296(4):F762-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Riazi Shahla
Tiwari Swasti
Sharma Nikhil
Rash Arjun
Ecelbarger C M
Author Affiliation
Associate Professor, Dept. of Medicine, Georgetown Univ., 4000 Reservoir Rd, NW, Washington, DC, 20007, USA.
Source
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2009 Apr;296(4):F762-70
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Biological Markers - urine
Blood pressure
Blotting, Western
Crosses, Genetic
Cyclic N-Oxides - pharmacology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - metabolism
Dinoprost - analogs & derivatives - urine
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Furosemide - pharmacology
Glucose Intolerance - metabolism - physiopathology
Hypertension - metabolism - physiopathology
Insulin Resistance
Kidney Medulla - drug effects - metabolism
Male
NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester - pharmacology
Natriuresis
Nitric Oxide - urine
Nitric Oxide Synthase - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Oxidative Stress
Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Sodium Potassium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors - pharmacology
Sodium-Potassium-Chloride Symporters - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase - metabolism
Spin Labels
Telemetry
Time Factors
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Insulin resistance is associated with hypertension by mechanisms likely involving the kidney. To determine how the major apical sodium transporter of the thick ascending limb, the bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) is regulated by high-fat feeding, we treated young male, Fischer 344 X Brown Norway (F344BN) rats for 8 wk with diets containing either normal (NF, 4%) or high (HF, 36%) fat, by weight, primarily as lard. HF-fed rats had impaired glucose tolerance, increased urine excretion of 8-isoprostane (a marker of oxidative stress), increased protein levels for NKCC2 (50-125%) and the renal outer medullary potassium channel (106%), as well as increased natriuretic response to furosemide (20-40%). To test the role of oxidative stress in this response, in study 2, rats were fed the NF or HF diet plus plain drinking water, or water containing N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (100 mg/l), or tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic (1 mmol/l). The combination of tempol with HF nullified the increase in medullary NKCC2, while l-NAME with HF led to the highest expression of medullary NKCC2 (to 498% of NF mean). However, neither of these drugs dramatically affected the elevated natriuretic response to furosemide with HF. Finally, l-NAME led to a marked increase in blood pressure (measured by radiotelemetry), which was significantly enhanced with HF. Mean arterial blood pressure at 7 wk was as follows (mmHg): NF, 100 +/- 2; NF plus l-NAME, 122 +/- 3; and HF plus l-NAME, 131 +/- 2. Overall, HF feeding increased the abundance of NKCC2. Inappropriately high sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb via NKCC2 may contribute to hypertension with insulin resistance.
PubMed ID
19193725 View in PubMed
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[A complex approach to evaluation of human genome instability].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168018
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2006;(4):36-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Iu A Revazova
L V Khripach
I E Sidorova
V V Iurchenko
I E Zykova
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2006;(4):36-41
Date
2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Genome, Human - genetics
Human Genome Project
Humans
Mutagenesis - genetics
Occupational Diseases - genetics
Occupational Exposure
Oxidative Stress - physiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Russia
Abstract
In this study, evaluation of genome instability in individuals exposed to chemical compounds included detection of the genetic polymorphism of some xenobiotic metabolic enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1E1, PON1, GSTM1, GSTT1), as well as measurement of oxidative state chemiluminescent variables and the level of cytogenetic damage. According to the study, the level of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes shows a strong correlation with PON54 left allele and GSTM1 null genotype, and can be described by the polynomial function of blood plasma luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. The frequencies of micronuclei in buccal epithelium displayed a weak association with GSTT1 null genotype.
PubMed ID
16889354 View in PubMed
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Activation of mu-opiate receptors as a factor of regulation of heart resistance to ischemia-reperfusion and oxidative stress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53983
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2000 Aug;130(8):752-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
T V Lasukova
T Y Rebrova
S V Tam
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Experimental Cardiology, Institute of Cardiology, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Tomsk.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2000 Aug;130(8):752-5
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Enkephalin, Ala(2)-MePhe(4)-Gly(5)- - pharmacology
In Vitro
Male
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects - physiology
Myocardial Reperfusion Injury - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Oxidative Stress
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Receptors, Opioid, mu - agonists - physiology
Abstract
Intravenous injection of the selective mu-opiate receptor agonist DAMGO (0.1 mg/kg, 15 min before isolation of the heart) improved resistance of isolated perfused rat heart to ischemia (45 min) and reperfusion (60 min) damages. In vivo administration of DAMGO prevented reperfusion-induced damages to cardiomyocytes and decreased the content of conjugated dienes in the myocardium during ischemia-reperfusion in vitro. Furthermore, stimulation of mu-opiate receptors promoted recovery of myocardial contractility during reoxygenation, but had no effect on heart resistance to free radical-induced damages during perfusion of isolated heart with a solution containing Fe2+ and ascorbic acid.
PubMed ID
11177234 View in PubMed
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Acute hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure does not cause oxidative stress in late-copepodite stage of Calanus finmarchicus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286855
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017;80(16-18):820-829
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Bjørn Henrik Hansen
Anna Hallmann
Dag Altin
Bjørn Munro Jenssen
Tomasz M Ciesielski
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017;80(16-18):820-829
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Copepoda - drug effects
Drug resistance
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Glutathione - metabolism
Hydrogen Peroxide - toxicity
Lethal Dose 50
Malondialdehyde - metabolism
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Norway
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Seawater - chemistry
Toxicity Tests, Acute
Abstract
Use of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for removal of salmon lice in the aquaculture industry has created concern that non-target organisms might be affected during treatment scenarios. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential for H2O2 to produce oxidative stress and reduce survival in one of the most abundant zooplankton species in Norwegian coastal areas, the copepod Calanus finmarchicus. Copepods were subjected to two 96-hr tests: (1) acute toxicity test where mortality was determined and (2) treated copepods were exposed to concentrations below the No Observed Effect Concentration (0.75 mg/L) H2O2 and analyzed for antioxidant enzyme activities, as well as levels of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Compared to available and comparable LC50 values from the literature, our results suggest that C. finmarchicus is highly sensitive to H2O2. However, 96-hr exposure of C. finmarchicus to 0.75 mg H2O2/L did not significantly affect the antioxidant systems even though the concentration is just below the level where mortality is expected. Data suggest that aqueous H2O2 exposure did not cause cellular accumulation with associated oxidative stress, but rather produced acute effects on copepod surface (carapace). Further investigation is required to ensure that aqueous exposure during H2O2 treatment in salmon fish farms does not exert adverse effects on local non-target crustacean species and populations. In particular, studies on copepod developmental stages with a more permeable carapace are warranted.
PubMed ID
28777041 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent increase in oxidative stress in gastrocnemius muscle with unloading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91973
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2008 Dec;105(6):1695-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Siu Parco M
Pistilli Emidio E
Alway Stephen E
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Health Technology and Informatics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ., Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China. htpsiu@inet.polyu.edu.hk
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2008 Dec;105(6):1695-705
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Blotting, Western
Catalase - metabolism
Female
Hindlimb Suspension - physiology
Hydrogen Peroxide - metabolism
Male
Malondialdehyde - metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal - growth & development - metabolism - physiology
Organ Size - physiology
Oxidative Stress - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Superoxide Dismutase - metabolism
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
Oxidative stress increases during unloading in muscle from young adult rats. The present study examined the markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme gene and protein expressions in medial gastrocnemius muscles of aged and young adult (30 and 6 mo of age) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats after 14 days of hindlimb suspension. Medial gastrocnemius muscle weight was decreased by approximately 30% in young adult and aged rats following suspension. When muscle weight was normalized to animal body weight, it was reduced by 12% and 22% in young adult and aged rats, respectively, after suspension. Comparisons between young adult and aged control animals demonstrated a 25% and 51% decline in muscle mass when expressed as absolute muscle weight and muscle weight normalized to the animal body weight, respectively. H(2)O(2) content was elevated by 43% while Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein content was reduced by 28% in suspended muscles compared with control muscles exclusively in the aged animals. Suspended muscles had greater content of malondialdehyde (MDA)/4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HAE) (29% and 58% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively), nitrotyrosine (76% and 65% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively), and catalase activity (69% and 43% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively) relative to control muscles. Changes in oxidative stress markers MDA/4-HAE, H(2)O(2), and MnSOD protein contents in response to hindlimb unloading occurred in an age-dependent manner. These findings are consistent with the hypotheses that oxidative stress has a role in mediating disuse-induced and sarcopenia-associated muscle losses. Our data suggest that aging may predispose skeletal muscle to increased levels of oxidative stress both at rest and during unloading.
PubMed ID
18801960 View in PubMed
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[Age features of cytogenetic effects of spring-summer encephalitis among residents of northern western Siberia in connection with polymorphism for genes of glutathione-S-transferase].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290013
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2016; 29(5):756-759
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
N N Ilyinskikh
E N Ilyinskikh
Author Affiliation
Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050, Russian Federation; nauka-tomsk@yandex.ru.
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2016; 29(5):756-759
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - metabolism
Chromosome Aberrations
Cytogenetic Analysis - methods
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Female
Glutathione Transferase - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Male
Mouth Mucosa - pathology
Oxidative Stress - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this work was a comparative study of the effects of spring diseases cytogenetic years of tick-borne encephalitis in elderly and young age due to differences in genes of glutathione-S-transferase. Surveyed by routine cytogenetics 120 patients with tick-borne encephalitis residents North of Tomsk region. We have taken in the study persons aged 20-35 years (Group 1) and 65-85 years old (Group 2). Material for study (buccal epithelium) was taken from each subject 3-5 times: 1st-2nd day after hospitalization, in 1 week, 1, 3 and 6 months. Tick-borne encephalitis infection causes a significantly large changes in cytogenetic regimens using buccal epithelium in the elderly than in younger patients. Restoring cytogenetic norms observed in a group of young in 3 months after hospitalization, in the elderly - in 6 months. When comparing cytogenetic effects of encephalitis shows: the young patients tick-borne encephalitis level by routine cytogenetics abnormal cells was significantly higher in carriers of inactive forms of gene GSTM1 (0)/GSTT1 (0) than containing active homozygous variants of these genes. Such patterns have not been noted in a group of elderly patients.
????? ????????? ?????? ??????? ????????????? ???????? ???????????????? ??????????? ???????-??????? ????????? ?????????? ? ??? ???????? ? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ? ?????????? ?? ????? ?????????-S-???????????. ???????????????? ???????????? ???? ????????? ? 120 ??????? ???????? ??????????? ??????? ?????? ??????? ??????? - 20-35 ??? (1-? ??????) ? 65-85 ??? (2-? ??????). ???????? ??? ???????????? (?????????? ????????) ??? ???? ? ??????? ???????????? 3-5 ???: 1-2-? ???? ????? ??????????????, ????? 1 ???, 1, 3 ? 6 ???. ???????????, ??? ???????? ????????? ???????? ??????? ??????? ???????????????? ????????? ? ?????????? ???????? ? ???????, ??? ? ??????? ???????. ?????????????? ???????????????? ????? ????????? ? ?????? ??????? ????? 3 ??? ????? ??????????????, ? ? ??????? - ????? 6 ???. ??? ????????? ???????????????? ??????????? ????????? ?????????? ????????: ? ??????? ??????? ??????? ??????????????? ?????????? ?????? ??? ??????????? ???? ? ????????? ?????????? ????? ????? GSTM1(0)/GSTT1(0) ?? ????????? ? ????????, ? ??????? ???? ???????? ???????????? ???????? ???? ?????. ? ??????? ????????? ????? ?????????????? ?? ????????.
PubMed ID
28556645 View in PubMed
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Aging influences multiple incidices of oxidative stress in the aortic media of the Fischer 344/NNiaxBrown Norway/BiNia rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82960
Source
Free Radic Res. 2006 Feb;40(2):185-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Rice K M
Preston D L
Walker E M
Blough E R
Author Affiliation
Marshall University, Department of Biological Sciences, Huntington, WV 2755-1090, USA.
Source
Free Radic Res. 2006 Feb;40(2):185-97
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Aorta - metabolism
Cell Proliferation
Ethidium - chemistry
Genes, src
JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - metabolism
Ki-67 Antigen - metabolism
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - metabolism
Multienzyme Complexes
NF-kappa B - genetics - metabolism
Oxidative Stress
Phenanthridines - chemistry
Phosphorylation
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
Proteins - chemistry - metabolism
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 2 - metabolism
bcl-2-Associated X Protein - metabolism
Abstract
Here, we determine the influence of aging on multiple markers of oxidative stress in the aorta of adult (6-month), aged (30-month) and very aged (36-month) Fischer 344/NNiaHSdxBrown Norway/BiNia (F344/NxBN) rats. Compared to adults, increases in as determined by oxidation of hydroethidine (HE) to ethidium (Et) were increased 79.7+/-7.0% in 36-month aortae and this finding was highly correlated with increases in medal thickness (r=0.773, p
PubMed ID
16390828 View in PubMed
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Aging influences multiple indices of oxidative stress in the heart of the Fischer 344/NNia x Brown Norway/BiNia rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83665
Source
Redox Rep. 2007;12(4):167-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Asano Shinichi
Rice Kevin M
Kakarla Sunil
Katta Anjaiah
Desai Devashish H
Walker Ernest M
Wehner Paulette
Blough Eric R
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia 25755-1090, USA.
Source
Redox Rep. 2007;12(4):167-80
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Aldehydes - metabolism
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Blood Pressure - physiology
Female
Heart - physiopathology
Heat-Shock Proteins - metabolism
Immunoblotting
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - metabolism
Myocardium - metabolism - pathology
Oxidative Stress
Phosphorylation
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Regression Analysis
Signal Transduction - physiology
Superoxides - metabolism
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
We report the influence of aging on multiple markers of oxidative-nitrosative stress in the heart of adult (6-month), aged (30-month) and very aged (36-month) Fischer 344/NNiaHSd x Brown Norway/BiNia (F344/NXBN) rats. Compared to adult (6-month) hearts, indices of oxidative (superoxide anion [O2*-], 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [4-HNE]) and nitrosative (protein nitrotyrosylation) stress were 34.1 +/- 28.1%, 186 +/- 28.1% and 94 +/- 5.8% higher, respectively, in 36-month hearts and these findings were highly correlated with increases in left ventricular wall thickness (r > 0.669; r > 0.710 and P
PubMed ID
17705987 View in PubMed
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Aldehyde-protein adducts in the liver as a result of ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10666
Source
Front Biosci. 1999 Jun 1;4:D506-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1999
Author
O. Niemelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, University of Oulu, FIN-90220 Oulu, and EP Central Hospital Laboratory, Seinäjoki, Finland. onni.niemela@epshp.fi
Source
Front Biosci. 1999 Jun 1;4:D506-13
Date
Jun-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aldehydes - immunology - metabolism
Animals
Biological Markers - analysis - blood
Disease Models, Animal
Ethanol - metabolism
Extracellular Matrix Proteins - metabolism
Humans
Liver - chemistry - metabolism
Liver Diseases - immunology - metabolism
Oxidative Stress
Protein Binding
Proteins - immunology - metabolism
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Swine
Abstract
A number of systems that generate oxygen free radicals and reactive aldehydic species are activated by excessive ethanol consumption. Recent studies from human alcoholics and from experimental animals have indicated that acetaldehyde and aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation, which are generated in such processes, can bind to proteins forming stable adducts. Adduct formation may lead to several adverse consequences, such as interference with protein function, stimulation of fibrogenesis, and induction of immune responses. The presence of protein adducts in the centrilobular region of the liver in alcohol abusers with an early phase of histological liver damage indicates that adduct formation is one of the key events in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Dietary supplementation with fat and/or iron strikingly increases the amount of aldehyde-derived epitopes in the liver together with promotion of fibrogenesis.
PubMed ID
10352137 View in PubMed
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Altered plasma adipokines and markers of oxidative stress suggest increased risk of cardiovascular disease in First Nation youth with obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152924
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2009 Jun;10(4):269-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Danielle M Stringer
Elizabeth A C Sellers
Laura L Burr
Carla G Taylor
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2009 Jun;10(4):269-77
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipokines - blood
Adolescent
Antioxidants - analysis
Biological Markers - blood
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Obesity - blood - complications - epidemiology
Oxidative Stress - physiology
Risk factors
Abstract
To evaluate cardiovascular disease risk in First Nation youth with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or obesity by comparing pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines, markers of oxidative stress and the plasma phospholipid fatty acid profile.
Self-declared First Nation youth (12-15 yr) with T2DM (n = 24) as well as age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched controls (obese group; n = 19) and unmatched controls (control group; n = 34) were recruited from a pediatric diabetes clinic.
Plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha, ultrasensitive C-reactive protein, resistin, and total antioxidant status were not different among the three groups. Plasma total leptin, soluble leptin receptor, and free leptin were significantly higher in the T2DM group than the control group (p
PubMed ID
19175895 View in PubMed
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251 records – page 1 of 26.