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Abundant Trimethylornithine Lipids and Specific Gene Sequences Are Indicative of Planctomycete Importance at the Oxic/Anoxic Interface in Sphagnum-Dominated Northern Wetlands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273730
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Sep;81(18):6333-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Eli K Moore
Laura Villanueva
Ellen C Hopmans
W Irene C Rijpstra
Anchelique Mets
Svetlana N Dedysh
Jaap S Sinninghe Damsté
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Sep;81(18):6333-44
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acidobacteria - chemistry - isolation & purification
Bacteria - chemistry - genetics - isolation & purification
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Lipids - analysis - chemistry
Oxidation-Reduction
Phylogeny
RNA, Bacterial - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Russia
Soil - chemistry
Soil Microbiology
Sphagnopsida - chemistry - genetics - microbiology
Sweden
Wetlands
Abstract
Northern wetlands make up a substantial terrestrial carbon sink and are often dominated by decay-resistant Sphagnum mosses. Recent studies have shown that planctomycetes appear to be involved in degradation of Sphagnum-derived debris. Novel trimethylornithine (TMO) lipids have recently been characterized as abundant lipids in various Sphagnum wetland planctomycete isolates, but their occurrence in the environment has not yet been confirmed. We applied a combined intact polar lipid (IPL) and molecular analysis of peat cores collected from two northern wetlands (Saxnäs Mosse [Sweden] and Obukhovskoye [Russia]) in order to investigate the preferred niche and abundance of TMO-producing planctomycetes. TMOs were present throughout the profiles of Sphagnum bogs, but their concentration peaked at the oxic/anoxic interface, which coincided with a maximum abundance of planctomycete-specific 16S rRNA gene sequences. The sequences detected at the oxic/anoxic interface were affiliated with the Isosphaera group, while sequences present in the anoxic peat layers were related to an uncultured planctomycete group. Pyrosequencing-based analysis identified Planctomycetes as the major bacterial group at the oxic/anoxic interface at the Obukhovskoye peat (54% of total 16S rRNA gene sequence reads), followed by Acidobacteria (19% reads), while in the Saxnäs Mosse peat, Acidobacteria were dominant (46%), and Planctomycetes contributed to 6% of the total reads. The detection of abundant TMO lipids in planctomycetes isolated from peat bogs and the lack of TMO production by cultures of acidobacteria suggest that planctomycetes are the producers of TMOs in peat bogs. The higher accumulation of TMOs at the oxic/anoxic interface and the change in the planctomycete community with depth suggest that these IPLs could be synthesized as a response to changing redox conditions at the oxic/anoxic interface.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26150465 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active sulfur cycling in the terrestrial deep subsurface.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306964
Source
ISME J. 2020 05; 14(5):1260-1272
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
05-2020
Author
Emma Bell
Tiina Lamminmäki
Johannes Alneberg
Anders F Andersson
Chen Qian
Weili Xiong
Robert L Hettich
Manon Frutschi
Rizlan Bernier-Latmani
Author Affiliation
Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, Environmental Engineering Institute, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015, Lausanne, Switzerland. emma.bell1@ucalgary.ca.
Source
ISME J. 2020 05; 14(5):1260-1272
Date
05-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Bacteria - metabolism
Finland
Groundwater - microbiology
Microbiota
Oxidation-Reduction
Sulfates - metabolism
Sulfides - metabolism
Sulfur - metabolism
Abstract
The deep terrestrial subsurface remains an environment where there is limited understanding of the extant microbial metabolisms. At Olkiluoto, Finland, a deep geological repository is under construction for the final storage of spent nuclear fuel. It is therefore critical to evaluate the potential impact microbial metabolism, including sulfide generation, could have upon the safety of the repository. We investigated a deep groundwater where sulfate is present, but groundwater geochemistry suggests limited microbial sulfate-reducing activity. Examination of the microbial community at the genome-level revealed microorganisms with the metabolic capacity for both oxidative and reductive sulfur transformations. Deltaproteobacteria are shown to have the genetic capacity for sulfate reduction and possibly sulfur disproportionation, while Rhizobiaceae, Rhodocyclaceae, Sideroxydans, and Sulfurimonas oxidize reduced sulfur compounds. Further examination of the proteome confirmed an active sulfur cycle, serving for microbial energy generation and growth. Our results reveal that this sulfide-poor groundwater harbors an active microbial community of sulfate-reducing and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, together mediating a sulfur cycle that remained undetected by geochemical monitoring alone. The ability of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria to limit the accumulation of sulfide was further demonstrated in groundwater incubations and highlights a potential sink for sulfide that could be beneficial for geological repository safety.
PubMed ID
32047278 View in PubMed
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[Activity of enzymatic antioxidant system in the rat tissues under conditions of over- and restricted nutrition]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97370
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2009 Nov-Dec;81(6):104-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu V Nikitchenko
V M Dziuba
A S Popovych
V V Bondar
H O Sheremet
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2009 Nov-Dec;81(6):104-10
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Antioxidants - metabolism
Caloric Restriction
Glutathione Peroxidase - metabolism
Lipid Peroxides - blood - metabolism
Liver - enzymology - metabolism
Male
Overnutrition - blood - enzymology
Oxidation-Reduction
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Abstract
The state of enzymatic antioxidant system and thyroid status in the rat tissues under early postnatal overnutrition leading to shortening of life-span and calorie-restricted diet extending lifespan have been studied. It was found that the concentration of thyroxine, body weight and content of lipid hydroperoxides in the blood serum and liver post-mitochondrial fraction of rats had been reliably increased. At the same time the concentration of GSH and GSSG, superoxide dismutase, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GP) activities in the liver and GP activity in the blood serum of experimental rats were reduced. The use of calorie-restricted diet for 2 months showed considerable decrease of thyroxine and triiodothyronine concentration, body weight and the content of lipid hydroperoxides in the blood serum of experimental rats compared with control. At the same time GP activity in the liver, Se-dependent GP activity and content of ceruloplasmin in blood of experimental rats were essentially enhanced. The obtained results allow to conclude that from all studied indices the activity of GSH-dependent antioxidant system (especially Se-dependent GP activity) and thyroid status revealed the most sensible changes in response to the used kind of nutrition. Unlike hypocaloric diet overnutrition results in a decrease of Se-dependent GP activity in the liver and blood of rats. That may be the most crucial moment in the maintenance of prooxidant-antioxidant balance of tissues.
PubMed ID
20387664 View in PubMed
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Aerobic power declines with aging in rat skeletal muscles perfused at matched convective O2 delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49786
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2003 Feb;94(2):744-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Russell T Hepple
Jason L Hagen
Daniel J Krause
Cory C Jackson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Kinesiology and Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4. hepple@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2003 Feb;94(2):744-51
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerobiosis
Aging - physiology
Animals
Biological Availability
Hindlimb
Muscle Contraction
Muscle, Skeletal - blood supply - metabolism - physiology
Oxidation-Reduction
Oxygen - blood
Oxygen consumption
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Although it is well established that maximal O(2) uptake (Vo(2 max)) declines from adulthood to old age, the role played by alterations in skeletal muscle is unclear. Specifically, because during whole body exercise reductions in convective O(2) delivery to the working muscles from adulthood to old age compromise aerobic performance, this obscures the influence of alterations within the skeletal muscles. We sought to overcome this limitation by using an in situ pump-perfused hindlimb preparation to permit matching of muscle convective O(2) delivery in young adult (8 mo; muscle convective O(2) delivery = 569 +/- 42 micromol O(2) x min(-1) x 100 g(-1)) and late middle-aged (28-30 mo; 539 +/- 62 micromol O(2) x min(-1) x 100 g(-1)) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats. The distal hindlimb muscles were electrically stimulated for 4 min (60 tetani/min), and Vo(2 max) was determined. Vo(2 max) normalized to the contracting muscle mass was 22% lower in the 28- to 30-mo-old (344 +/- 17 micromol O(2). min(-1) x 100 g(-1)) than the 8-mo-old (441 +/- 20 micromol O(2) x min(-1) x 100 g(-1); P
PubMed ID
12391069 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alterations in intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and redox potential modulate mast cell function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14273
Source
Eur J Immunol. 1997 Jan;27(1):297-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
K. Wolfreys
D B Oliveira
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Addenbrooke's Hospital, GB.
Source
Eur J Immunol. 1997 Jan;27(1):297-306
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Catalase - pharmacology
Cell Survival
Deferoxamine - pharmacology
Glutathione - metabolism
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Mast Cells - physiology
Oxidation-Reduction
Peritoneal Cavity - cytology
Rats
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin - metabolism
Spleen - cytology
Sulfhydryl Reagents - pharmacology
Abstract
The administration of mercuric chloride (HgCl2), gold compounds, or D-penicillamine to Brown Norway (BN) rats causes a T helper (Th)2 cell-associated autoimmune syndrome characterized by the production of a number of autoantibodies, marked elevation of serum IgE concentration, and tissue injury in the form of a vasculitis and arthritis. We have recently shown that the same compounds in vitro sensitize BN rat peritoneal mast cells for IgE-triggered mediator release and interleukin-4 mRNA production. We wished to test the hypothesis that these agents influence mast cell function via an effect on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production/redox balance. Mast cells were obtained from BN rats by peritoneal washout. Incubation with HgCl2, gold compounds or D-penicillamine (the latter only in the presence of copper ions) led to the intracellular production of ROS as shown by the oxidative production of the fluorescent compound 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein. Mast cells were more sensitive than splenocytes to this effect. Direct oxidative stress (exposure to H2O2) produced a similar sensitization for mediator release to that caused by HgCl2. Inhibition of ROS formation by desferrioxamine or catalase diminished the enhancement of IgE-mediated serotonin release caused by HgCl2, as did replenishment of intracellular glutathione. 2-Mercaptoethanol exacerbated the toxicity of HgCl2, perhaps due to the formation of a lipophilic complex that enhanced HgCl2 uptake. Blocking of glutathione synthesis increased the toxicity of HgCl2, but also abolished any sensitizing effect on mediator release. These results support three main predictions of our hypothesis: (1) the compounds known to influence mast cell function all lead to the generation of ROS within the mast cell; (2) direct oxidative stress causes sensitization for mediator release by the mast cell; and (3) modulation of ROS production/redox balance within the mast cell modulates the effects of these compounds on mast cell function. The balance of oxidative/antioxidative influences may play an important role in the modulation of mast cell function, particularly in the context of chemically induced autoimmunity.
PubMed ID
9022032 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternative waste residue materials for passive in situ prevention of sulfide-mine tailings oxidation: a field evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257398
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2014 Feb 28;267:245-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2014
Author
Peter Nason
Raymond H Johnson
Clara Neuschütz
Lena Alakangas
Björn Öhlander
Author Affiliation
Division of Geosciences and Waste Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleå, Sweden. Electronic address: peter.nason@ltu.se.
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2014 Feb 28;267:245-54
Date
Feb-28-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coal Ash - chemistry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Industrial Waste - analysis
Metals - analysis - chemistry
Mining
Oxidation-Reduction
Sewage - analysis
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Sulfides - chemistry
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Novel solutions for sulfide-mine tailings remediation were evaluated in field-scale experiments on a former tailings repository in northern Sweden. Uncovered sulfide-tailings were compared to sewage-sludge biosolid amended tailings over 2 years. An application of a 0.2m single-layer sewage-sludge amendment was unsuccessful at preventing oxygen ingress to underlying tailings. It merely slowed the sulfide-oxidation rate by 20%. In addition, sludge-derived metals (Cu, Ni, Fe, and Zn) migrated and precipitated at the tailings-to-sludge interface. By using an additional 0.6m thick fly-ash sealing layer underlying the sewage sludge layer, a solution to mitigate oxygen transport to the underlying tailings and minimize sulfide-oxidation was found. The fly-ash acted as a hardened physical barrier that prevented oxygen diffusion and provided a trap for sludge-borne metals. Nevertheless, the biosolid application hampered the application, despite the advances in the effectiveness of the fly-ash layer, as sludge-borne nitrate leached through the cover system into the underlying tailings, oxidizing pyrite. This created a 0.3m deep oxidized zone in 6-years. This study highlights that using sewage sludge in unconventional cover systems is not always a practical solution for the remediation of sulfide-bearing mine tailings to mitigate against sulfide weathering and acid rock drainage formation.
PubMed ID
24462894 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An Acidophilic Desulfosporosinus Isolated from the Oxidized Mining Wastes in the Transbaikal Area].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273469
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2015 Sep-Oct;84(5):595-605
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Karnachuk
I A Kurganskaya
M R Avakyan
Y A Frank
O P Ikkert
R A Filenko
E V Danilovac
N V Pimenov
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2015 Sep-Oct;84(5):595-605
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clostridium - classification - drug effects - genetics - metabolism
Copper - chemistry - metabolism - pharmacology
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Microbial Consortia - genetics
Mining
Oxidation-Reduction
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Siberia
Sulfates - chemistry - metabolism
Waste Products
Abstract
Dissimilatory sulfate reduction plays an important role in removal of dissolved metals from acidic mine waters. Although this process was convincingly shown to occur in acidic waste of metal recovery, few isolates of acid-tolerant sulfate rducers are known. We isolated a new acidophilic sulfidogen, strain BG, from the oxidized acidic waste of the Bom-Gorkhon tungsten deposit, Transbaikalia, Russia. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence made it possible to identify it as a member of the genus Desulfosporosinus. Unlike other known acidophilic sulfate reducers of this genus, strain BG was tolerant to high copper concentrations (up to 5 g/L), could grow on organic acids at low ambient pH, and formed crystalline copper sulfides (covellite and chalcopyrite). Molecular analysis of the phenotypes predominating in oxidized waste and in enrichment cultures confirmed the presence of various Desulfosporosinus strains.
PubMed ID
27169248 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anaerobic methanotrophic communities thrive in deep submarine permafrost.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296101
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 01 22; 8(1):1291
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-22-2018
Author
Matthias Winkel
Julia Mitzscherling
Pier P Overduin
Fabian Horn
Maria Winterfeld
Ruud Rijkers
Mikhail N Grigoriev
Christian Knoblauch
Kai Mangelsdorf
Dirk Wagner
Susanne Liebner
Author Affiliation
GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, Section 5.3 Geomicrobiology, 14473, Potsdam, Germany. mwinkel@gfz-potsdam.de.
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 01 22; 8(1):1291
Date
01-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anaerobiosis - physiology
Archaea - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Carbon - metabolism
DNA, Archaeal - genetics
Geologic Sediments - microbiology
Methane - metabolism
Nitrogen - metabolism
Oceans and Seas
Oxidation-Reduction
Permafrost - microbiology
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Russia
Abstract
Thawing submarine permafrost is a source of methane to the subsurface biosphere. Methane oxidation in submarine permafrost sediments has been proposed, but the responsible microorganisms remain uncharacterized. We analyzed archaeal communities and identified distinct anaerobic methanotrophic assemblages of marine and terrestrial origin (ANME-2a/b, ANME-2d) both in frozen and completely thawed submarine permafrost sediments. Besides archaea potentially involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) we found a large diversity of archaea mainly belonging to Bathyarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, and Euryarchaeota. Methane concentrations and d13C-methane signatures distinguish horizons of potential AOM coupled either to sulfate reduction in a sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) or to the reduction of other electron acceptors, such as iron, manganese or nitrate. Analysis of functional marker genes (mcrA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) corroborate potential activity of AOM communities in submarine permafrost sediments at low temperatures. Modeled potential AOM consumes 72-100% of submarine permafrost methane and up to 1.2?Tg of carbon per year for the total expected area of submarine permafrost. This is comparable with AOM habitats such as cold seeps. We thus propose that AOM is active where submarine permafrost thaws, which should be included in global methane budgets.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29358665 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anaerobic microbial Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) reduction in coastal marine sediments controlled by organic carbon content.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285578
Source
Environ Microbiol. 2016 Sep;18(9):3159-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Katja Laufer
James M Byrne
Clemens Glombitza
Caroline Schmidt
Bo Barker Jørgensen
Andreas Kappler
Source
Environ Microbiol. 2016 Sep;18(9):3159-74
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Carbon - analysis - metabolism
Denmark
Ferric Compounds - metabolism
Ferrous Compounds - metabolism
Geologic Sediments - chemistry - microbiology
Nitrates - metabolism
Oxidation-Reduction
Abstract
Coastal marine sediments contain varying concentrations of iron, oxygen, nitrate and organic carbon. It is unknown how organic carbon content influences the activity of nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers and microbial Fe-redox cycling in such sediments. Therefore, microcosms were prepared with two coastal marine sediments (Kalø Vig and Norsminde Fjord at Aarhus Bay, Denmark) varying in TOC from 0.4 to 3.0 wt%. The microcosms were incubated under light/dark conditions with/without addition of nitrate and/or Fe(II). Although most probable number (MPN) counts of phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers were five times lower in the low-TOC sediment, phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation rates were higher compared with the high-TOC sediment. Fe(III)-amended microcosms showed that this lower net Fe(II) oxidation in the high-TOC sediment is caused by concurrent bacterial Fe(III) reduction. In contrast, MPN counts of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers and net rates of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation were comparable in low- and high-TOC sediments. However, the ratio of nitratereduced :iron(II)oxidized was higher in the high-TOC sediment, suggesting that a part of the nitrate was reduced by mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers and chemoorganoheterotrophic nitrate-reducers. Our results demonstrate that dynamic microbial Fe cycling occurs in these sediments and that the extent of Fe cycling is dependent on organic carbon content.
PubMed ID
27234371 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic oxidation of methane and associated microbiome in anoxic water of Northwestern Siberian lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305762
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2020 Sep 20; 736:139588
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-20-2020
Author
Léa Cabrol
Frédéric Thalasso
Laure Gandois
Armando Sepulveda-Jauregui
Karla Martinez-Cruz
Roman Teisserenc
Nikita Tananaev
Alexander Tveit
Mette M Svenning
Maialen Barret
Author Affiliation
Aix-Marseille University, Univ Toulon, CNRS, IRD, M.I.O. UM 110, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography, Marseille, France; Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity IEB, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Escuela de Ingeniería Bioquímica, Pontificia Universidad de Valparaiso, Av Brasil 2085, Valparaiso, Chile.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2020 Sep 20; 736:139588
Date
Sep-20-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Arctic Regions
Lakes
Methane - analysis
Microbiota
Oxidation-Reduction
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
Russia
Water
Abstract
Arctic lakes emit methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. The magnitude of this flux could increase with permafrost thaw but might also be mitigated by microbial CH4 oxidation. Methane oxidation in oxic water has been extensively studied, while the contribution of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) to CH4 mitigation is not fully understood. We have investigated four Northern Siberian stratified lakes in an area of discontinuous permafrost nearby Igarka, Russia. Analyses of CH4 concentrations in the water column demonstrated that 60 to 100% of upward diffusing CH4 was oxidized in the anoxic layers of the four lakes. A combination of pmoA and mcrA gene qPCR and 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding showed that the same taxa, all within Methylomonadaceae and including the predominant genus Methylobacter as well as Crenothrix, could be the major methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in the anoxic water of the four lakes. Correlation between Methylomonadaceae and OTUs within Methylotenera, Geothrix and Geobacter genera indicated that AOM might occur in an interaction between MOB, denitrifiers and iron-cycling partners. We conclude that MOB within Methylomonadaceae could have a crucial impact on CH4 cycling in these Siberian Arctic lakes by mitigating the majority of produced CH4 before it leaves the anoxic zone. This finding emphasizes the importance of AOM by Methylomonadaceae and extends our knowledge about CH4 cycle in lakes, a crucial component of the global CH4 cycle.
PubMed ID
32497884 View in PubMed
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