Skip header and navigation

Refine By

359 records – page 1 of 36.

A 4-year, cluster-randomized, controlled childhood obesity prevention study: STOPP.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99038
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
C. Marcus
G. Nyberg
A. Nordenfelt
M. Karpmyr
J. Kowalski
U. Ekelund
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, National Childhood Obesity Centre, Stockholm, Sweden. claude.marcus@ki.se
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Child
Cluster analysis
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Physical Fitness - psychology
Prevalence
Risk Reduction Behavior
School Health Services
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of a school-based intervention programme to reduce the prevalence of overweight in 6 to 10-year-old children. DESIGN: Cluster-randomized, controlled study. SUBJECTS: A total of 3135 boys and girls in grades 1-4 were included in the study. METHODS: Ten schools were selected in Stockholm county area and randomized to intervention (n=5) and control (n=5) schools. Low-fat dairy products and whole-grain bread were promoted and all sweets and sweetened drinks were eliminated in intervention schools. Physical activity (PA) was aimed to increase by 30 min day(-1) during school time and sedentary behaviour restricted during after school care time. PA was measured by accelerometry. Eating habits at home were assessed by parental report. Eating disorders were evaluated by self-report. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight and obesity decreased by 3.2% (from 20.3 to 17.1) in intervention schools compared with an increase of 2.8% (from 16.1 to 18.9) in control schools (P
PubMed ID
19290010 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activity and obesity of Colombian immigrants in Canada who use a food bank.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159910
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 2007 Oct;105(2):681-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Victor Ng
Timothy J Rush
Meizi He
Jennifer D Irwin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario.
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 2007 Oct;105(2):681-7
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Aged
Colombia - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Exercise - psychology
Female
Food Services - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Ontario
Overweight - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to provide some preliminary description of the Latin-Canadian community by reporting the socioeconomic status, physical activity, and weight status (i.e., healthy weight, overweight, or obese status) of Colombians newly immigrated to London, Ontario Canada. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on a convenience sample of 77 adult Colombian immigrant food bank users (46.8% men; mean age 39.9 yr., SD=11.8). Physical activity was gauged using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and self-report Body Mass Index, and sociodemographic data were collected. Of respondents, 47% had a university education, and 97% received social support. 61% met recommended levels of physical activity. Men were more active, being involved in about 130 min. more of exercise per week, and more men were overweight than women (63.9% versus 39.0%, respectively). Of respondents, 73% reported being less active than before coming to Canada. This pilot study indicates that Latin-Canadian immigrants are a vulnerable group in need of acculturational support. Further study is warranted.
PubMed ID
18065093 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adiposity among children in Norway by urbanity and maternal education: a nationally representative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107305
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:842
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anna Biehl
Ragnhild Hovengen
Else-Karin Grøholt
Jøran Hjelmesæth
Bjørn Heine Strand
Haakon E Meyer
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P,O, Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. anna.biehl@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:842
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mothers - education
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Public Health
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
International research has demonstrated that rural residency is a risk factor for childhood adiposity. The main aim of this study was to investigate the urban-rural gradient in overweight and obesity and whether the association differed by maternal education.
Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured in a nationally representative sample of 3166 Norwegian eight-year-olds in 2010. Anthropometric measures were stratified by area of residence (urbanity) and maternal education. Risk estimates for overweight (including obesity) and waist-to-height ratio =0.5 were calculated by log-binomial regression.
Mean BMI and WC and risk estimates of overweight (including obesity) and waist-to-height ratio =0.5 were associated with both urbanity and maternal education. These associations were robust after mutual adjustment for each other. Furthermore, there was an indication of interaction between urbanity and maternal education, as trends of mean BMI and WC increased from urban to rural residence among children of low-educated mothers (p?=?0.01 for both BMI and WC), whereas corresponding trends for children from higher educational background were non-significant (p?>?0.30). However, formal tests of the interaction term urbanity by maternal education were non-significant (p-value for interaction was 0.29 for BMI and 0.31 for WC).
In this nationally representative study, children living rurally and children of low-educated mothers had higher mean BMI and waist circumference than children living in more urban areas and children of higher educated mothers.
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 2000 May 6;320(7244):1240-310797032
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013;13:14623413839
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Mar 15;155(6):516-911882525
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Aug 10;360(9331):473-8212241736
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(12):1307-1212578286
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Mar 22;326(7390):62412649234
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 1995;854:1-4528594834
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Mar;44(6):809-199080564
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 1999 May-Jun;26(3):219-2710355493
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Feb;29(2):163-915570312
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(3):215-2116040463
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Jan;30(1):23-3016344845
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Jun;30(6):988-9216432546
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2006 Nov;65(4):385-9217181905
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Sep;15(9):2348-5617890504
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2007 Sep;85(9):660-718026621
Cites: J Pediatr. 2008 Feb;152(2):207-1318206690
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Feb;16(2):275-8418239633
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Jun;32(6):1028-3018414423
Cites: J Public Health (Oxf). 2008 Sep;30(3):258-6518467431
Cites: J Rural Health. 2008 Fall;24(4):407-1519007396
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3(4):205-1118608637
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:38919828037
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2010 Jun;99(6):900-520175763
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2010 Aug;5(4):351-6020053147
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2010 Nov;38(5 Suppl):19-2721062836
Cites: Obes Rev. 2011 May;12(5):305-1421348925
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Feb;66(2):143-820724285
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Jan;35(1):128-3320567240
Cites: J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):234-4121761250
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 May 15;132(9):1080-322614305
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2012 Jul;36(7):969-7622614053
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2013 Apr;8(2):79-9723001989
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2000 Jul-Aug;27(4):407-2110942348
PubMed ID
24028668 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adiposity, physical activity and risk of diabetes mellitus: prospective data from the population-based HUNT study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287957
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 01 16;7(1):e013142
Publication Type
Article
Date
01-16-2017
Author
Kirsti Vik Hjerkind
Jo S Stenehjem
Tom I L Nilsen
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 01 16;7(1):e013142
Date
01-16-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Exercise
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Overweight - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Physical activity may counteract the adverse effects of adiposity on cardiovascular mortality; however, the evidence of a similar effect on diabetes is sparse. This study examines whether physical activity may compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk.
The study population consisted of 38 231 individuals aged 20 years or more who participated in two consecutive waves of the prospective longitudinal Nord-Trøndelag Health Study in Norway: in 1984-1986 and in 1995-1997. A Poisson regression model with SEs derived from robust variance was used to estimate adjusted risk ratios of diabetes between categories of body mass index and physical activity.
Risk of diabetes increased both with increasing body mass (Ptrend
Notes
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2006 Dec;13(6):909-1517143122
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Oct 2;288(13):1622-3112350193
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1997 Apr;20(4):537-449096977
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Jun;41(6):1206-1119461547
Cites: J Appl Physiol (1985). 2005 Sep;99(3):1205-1316103523
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1994 Sep;17(9):961-97988316
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1992 Oct;46(5):537-421479327
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Mar;69(3):373-8010075319
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Jun;32(6):959-6618283284
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Feb 12;277(6):472-79020271
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2003 May;6(3):299-30512740079
Cites: Obes Rev. 2010 Mar;11(3):202-2119744231
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Aug;32 Suppl 3:S56-918695655
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Apr 1;159(7):702-615033648
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Jan;30(1):53-817192333
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1995 Apr 1;122(7):481-67872581
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Aug;64(8):690-519666634
Cites: Diabetologia. 1991 Dec;34(12):891-81778354
Cites: Exp Physiol. 2013 Jan;98(1):7-1822872658
Cites: Diabetes. 1994 Jan;43(1):63-78262318
Cites: Lancet. 1991 Sep 28;338(8770):774-81681160
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2003 Jun;37(3):197-206; discussion 20612782543
Cites: J Women Aging. 2006;18(1):21-4016635948
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jan;36(1):52-6118426785
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;42(4):968-7722879362
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Aug 1;166(3):260-217493951
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Sep 8;292(10):1188-9415353531
Cites: Diabetologia. 2006 Dec;49(12):2983-9217019595
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Dec 21;44(12):2375-8215607401
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Jul 18;325(3):147-522052059
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 May 3;344(18):1343-5011333990
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Feb 7;346(6):393-40311832527
Cites: Lancet. 2014 Jan 4;383(9911):69-8223890997
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2006 Dec 15;119(12):2943-717019717
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Dec 23;351(26):2694-70315616204
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Sep 13;345(11):790-711556298
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Sep 12;286(10):1218-2711559268
Cites: Sports Med. 1997 Nov;24(5):321-369368278
PubMed ID
28093432 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjusting divergences between self-reported and measured height and weight in an adult Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107533
Source
Am J Health Behav. 2013 Nov;37(6):841-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Marguerite L Sagna
Donald Schopflocher
Kim Raine
Candace Nykiforuk
Ronald Plotnikoff
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. msagna@ualberta.ca
Source
Am J Health Behav. 2013 Nov;37(6):841-50
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Anthropometry
Bias (epidemiology)
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Prevalence
Self Report
Abstract
To develop algorithm equations that could be used to adjust self-reported height and weight to elicit better estimates of actual BMI.
Linear regression analyses were performed to generate equations that could predict actual height and weight from self-reported data collected through telephone interviews on a representative sample of Canadians aged 18 years or older.
There were systematic biases in self-reported height and weight, leading to an underestimation of BMI. The application of our calibration equations to self-reported data produced closer estimates to actual rates of overweight and obesity.
We advocate the use of our correction equation whenever dealing with self-reported height and weight from telephone surveys to avoid potential distortions in estimating obesity prevalence.
PubMed ID
24001633 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age and time effects on children's lifestyle and overweight in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267916
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:355
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lotta Moraeus
Lauren Lissner
Linda Olsson
Agneta Sjöberg
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:355
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Beverages
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
High physical activity, low sedentary behavior and low consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages can be markers of a healthy lifestyle. We aim to observe longitudinal changes and secular trends in these lifestyle variables as well as in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in 7-to-9-year-old schoolchildren related to gender and socioeconomic position.
Three cross-sectional surveys were carried out on schoolchildren in grades 1 and 2 (7-to-9-year-olds) in 2008 (n = 833), 2010 (n = 1085), and 2013 (n = 1135). Information on children's level of physical activity, sedentary behavior, diet, and parent's education level was collected through parental questionnaires. Children's height and weight were also measured. Longitudinal measurements were carried out on a subsample (n = 678) which was included both in 2008 (7-to-9-year-olds) and 2010 (9-to-11-year-olds). BMI was used to classify children into overweight (including obese) and obese based on the International Obesity Task Force reference. Questionnaire reported maternal education level was used as a proxy for socioeconomic position (SEP).
Longitudinally, consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages = 4 days/week increased from 7% to 16% in children with low SEP. Overall, sedentary behavior > 4 hours/day doubled from 14% to 31% (p
Notes
Cites: Obes Rev. 2010 Jul;11(7):489-9120331510
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Jan;34(1):41-719884892
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Feb;109(2):308-1219167959
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Oct;32(10):1525-3018626485
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2014 Dec;103(12):1277-8425164863
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;17(9):643-5317553702
Cites: Obes Rev. 2007 Mar;8 Suppl 1:23-917316297
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2000 Nov;154(11):1148-5211074858
Cites: BMJ. 2000 May 6;320(7244):1240-310797032
Cites: Obes Rev. 2011 May;12(5):305-1421348925
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2011 Sep;100(9):1249-5221592225
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:9821936895
Cites: Nutr J. 2011;10:10321962086
Cites: Nutr J. 2011;10:10621978299
Cites: Prev Med. 2011 Dec;53(6):402-722001687
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):379-8521835086
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2012 Jul;36(7):969-7622614053
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2012 Dec;7(6):413-2222899658
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2012 Dec;51(6 Suppl):S16-2123283154
Cites: BMJ. 2013;346:e749223321486
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2013 Apr;8(2):79-9723001989
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2013 Jun;44(6):605-1123683978
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014;14:64024958251
Cites: Obes Rev. 2014 Jul;15(7):541-5424629126
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Feb;68(2):223-824253759
Cites: J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Dec;113(12):1683-9423916972
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Feb;16(2):275-8418239633
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2013 Dec;28(6):954-6923969630
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Oct;98(4):1084-10223966427
Cites: Acad Pediatr. 2013 Jul-Aug;13(4):364-7023688439
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jul;98(1):180-823676424
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013;13:84224028668
PubMed ID
25884997 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alarming overweight and obesity figures in Sweden and in the world].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125606
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Dec 7-13;108(49):2566-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Martin Neovius
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Enheten för klinisk epidemiologi, institutionen för medicin (Solna), Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. martin.neovius@ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Dec 7-13;108(49):2566-8
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
World Health
PubMed ID
22468391 View in PubMed
Less detail

An exploratory spatial analysis of overweight and obesity in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150797
Source
Prev Med. 2009 Apr;48(4):362-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Theodora Pouliou
Susan J Elliott
Author Affiliation
School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. pouliot@mcmaster.ca
Source
Prev Med. 2009 Apr;48(4):362-7
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The identification of spatial clusters of overweight and obesity can be a key indicator for targeting scarce public health resources. This paper examines sex-specific spatial patterns of overweight/obesity in Canada as well as investigates the presence of spatial clusters.
Using data on Body Mass Index (BMI) from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey (20 years and older) cycle 3.1, a cross-sectional ecological-level study was conducted. Sex-specific prevalence of overweight and obesity were first mapped to explore spatial patterns. In order to assess the degree of spatial dependence, exploratory spatial data analysis was performed using the Moran's I statistic and the Local Indicator of Spatial Association (LISA).
Results revealed marked geographical variation in overweight/obesity prevalence with higher values in the Northern and Atlantic health-regions and lower values in the Southern and Western health-regions of Canada. Significant positive spatial autocorrelation was found for both males and females, with significant clusters of high values or 'hot spots' of obesity in the Atlantic and Northern health-regions of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario.
Findings reveal overweight/obesity clusters and underscore the importance of geographically focused prevention strategies informed by population-specific needs.
PubMed ID
19463485 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anthropometric changes in Sweden during the obesity epidemic--increased overweight among adolescents of non-Nordic origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136806
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Aug;100(8):1119-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Agneta Sjöberg
Lena Hulthén
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Public Health Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. agneta.sjoberg@allmed.gu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Aug;100(8):1119-26
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height - ethnology
Body mass index
Body Weight - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Overweight - epidemiology - ethnology
Prevalence
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To compare overweight, obesity and thinness prevalences in adolescents born in 1979 and 1985 and to evaluate the influence of parental migration background.
A total of 2306 15- to 16-year-old girls and boys in Gothenburg, Sweden, participated in two cross-sectional surveys (1994 and 2000). Height and weight were measured and interviews about parental origin were conducted. Overweight and obesity were classified according to International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) and WHO. Thinness was classified according to Cole.
Among girls, the prevalence of thinness decreased, 8.4% vs. 4.7%. The prevalence of overweight, including obesity, according to IOTF criteria, was 11.8% and 13.7% in 1994 and 2000, respectively. The corresponding figures according to WHO criteria were 14.5% and 17.5%. No significant changes occurred between cohorts in prevalences of overweight and obesity. However, when interaction between survey year and origin was tested, there was a significant difference in overweight according to WHO criteria (p=0.022).
A shift entailing increased risk for overweight in adolescents of non-Nordic origin was observed, while no changes occurred in the general population. Individual background factors are important to consider both for correct conclusions about health development in the population and for identification of target groups for health-promoting interventions.
PubMed ID
21342259 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are Canadian pediatric nephrology patients really overweight?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123077
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2012 Nov;78(5):359-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Abeer Yasin
Andréanne Benidir
Guido Filler
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Children's Hospital, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, London ON, Canada.
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2012 Nov;78(5):359-64
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Nephrology
Overweight - epidemiology
Pediatrics
Abstract
To assess the influence of height age and short stature on BMI z-scores in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in view of the pandemic increase of childhood obesity.
Pediatric nephrology patients older than 2 years of age from 2 tertiary centers in Ontario and age- and gender matched controls from a local reference population.
We estimated height, weight and body mass index (BMI) z-scores of 705 nephrology patients (319 female) and 4,196 controls aged 2.01 - 19.92 years with chronological and height-adjusted age (corresponding age for a given height plotted on the 50th percentile). The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) was used for the z-score Estimation.
Chronological age-based patient weight z-scores were significantly heavier than in the NHANES data (median weight z-score +0.29, BMI z-score +0.51; significantly non-zero), not significantly different from height-adjusted age-based BMI z-score (+0.51). The children with kidney problems were shorter (-0.10 SD) than controls.
The proportion of overweight nephrology patients was similar to matched controls and BMI z-score diminished with worsening GFR.
PubMed ID
22735363 View in PubMed
Less detail

359 records – page 1 of 36.