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An oral Brown Norway rat model for food allergy: comparison of age, sex, dosing volume, and allergen preparation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51646
Source
Toxicology. 2004 Mar 15;196(3):247-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2004
Author
Kirsten Pilegaard
Charlotte Madsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition, Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark. kpi@fdir.dk
Source
Toxicology. 2004 Mar 15;196(3):247-57
Date
Mar-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Allergens - administration & dosage - toxicity
Animals
Disease Models, Animal
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - biosynthesis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis - biosynthesis
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
The purpose of the presented experiments was to study the possibility of using the Brown Norway rat as a model for food allergy in our laboratory. Specific serum IgE against ovalbumin (OVA) was induced after dosing male and female Brown Norway rats daily by gavage for 35 days. The influence of various preparations of allergen: OVA grade II, OVA grade V, and fresh egg white, age (4 versus 8 weeks), dosing volumes, and animal suppliers was studied. A general finding was that females had statistically significantly higher specific IgE and IgG titres and number of responders than males. Egg white preparation, age, dosing volume, and animal supplier did not statistically significantly influence the median IgE and IgG titres and number of responders. The difference between immune responses in males and females could not be attributed to variations in daily intake of OVA or exposure via the lung. In our hands, the oral Brown rat food allergy model gives rise to a moderate number of IgE responders, 13-38 and 38-75% in males and females, respectively. For further experiments with this model in our laboratory, females seem the sex of choice.
PubMed ID
15036751 View in PubMed
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Brown Norway rat ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulin E antibodies increase the human basophil expression of CD63 marker.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57432
Source
Scand J Immunol. 2003 Mar;57(3):271-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
A. Bellou
J. Saint-Laudy
L. Knippels
C. Montémont
E. Vauthier
P. Gerard
H. Pellegrom
E K Koerkamp
J F Lesesve
J L Guéant
H. Lambert
J P Mallié
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de Néphrologie Expérimentale, UPRESS-JE2165, Faculté de Médecine de Nancy, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France. abdel.bellou@voila.fr
Source
Scand J Immunol. 2003 Mar;57(3):271-8
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaphylaxis - immunology
Animals
Antigens, CD - biosynthesis - immunology
Basophils - cytology - immunology - metabolism
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Histamine Release - immunology
Humans
Immunization
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Ovalbumin - immunology
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis - immunology
Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins - biosynthesis - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Anaphylactic shock is an immunoglobulin E (IgE)-dependent hypersensitivity. Biological tests like leucocyte histamine release (LHR) and human basophil activation (HBA), frequently used in human allergy, reflect both the amount of IgE fixed on cells and the cellular reactivity. To assess whether serum-specific IgE from Brown Norway (BN) rats prepared for ovalbumin (OVA)-induced anaphylactic shocks can activate human basophils which has a potential interest in experimental allergy: such a test could rapidly assert an IgE sensitization in laboratory animals genetically T-helper 2 (Th2)-predisposed. Rats (n = 39) were immunized three times (day 0, day 5 and day 21) with OVA injected subcutaneously. One week after the third immunization, a shock was induced with an intravenous (i.v.) bolus of OVA. Sensitization was assessed by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) test and dosages of serum IgE antibodies anti-OVA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Blood basophils were counted before and during the shock. Before the shock induction (at day 21), an LHR test was performed on rat blood, and human basophils were sensitized with rat sera. HBA was demonstrated by the increase in the percentage of cells expressing CD63 antigen membrane, measured by flow cytometry. Twenty-one days after the first subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization, the rat serum induced a significant HBA. HBA was observed neither with the same serum previously heated nor with the serum from nonimmunized rats (NIRs). OVA-specific IgEs were significantly increased in immunized rat (IR) serum. The PCA test was negative when the serum was previously heated (56 degrees C). We never observed any circulating basophils, and LHR test was negative. After OVA i.v. administration, all IRs died rapidly. HBA testing strongly suggests a mediation by specific IgE in the increase of CD63 in BN rats. Thus, HBA test seems useful in assessing whether an experimental allergy was induced in animals genetically predisposed to an immune response, Th2-mediated, like BN rat. We also conclude that rat basophil activation does not participate in the histamine release during anaphylactic shock in sensitized BN rats.
PubMed ID
12641656 View in PubMed
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Children with newly diagnosed IDDM have increased levels of antibodies to bovine serum albumin but not to ovalbumin. Childhood Diabetes in Finland Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217402
Source
Diabetes Care. 1994 Sep;17(9):970-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
T. Saukkonen
E. Savilahti
O. Vaarala
E T Virtala
J. Tuomilehto
H K Akerblom
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1994 Sep;17(9):970-6
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies - analysis - immunology
Antibody formation
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoblotting
Immunoglobulin A - analysis - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - analysis - immunology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Ovalbumin - immunology
Serum Albumin, Bovine - immunology
Abstract
To study the humoral immune response to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OA) in children with newly diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).
We examined serum samples from 505 children 0.8-14.9 years of age with newly diagnosed IDDM for antibodies to BSA and OA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We also had two control groups: 85 unrelated control children (0.8-7.1 years of age) and 395 nondiabetic siblings (3.0-14.9 years of age). The specificity of antibodies detected in ELISA was confirmed by immunoblotting in a subset of sera with varying levels of antibodies.
Diabetic children
PubMed ID
7988317 View in PubMed
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Comparison of antibody responses to hen's egg and cow's milk proteins in orally sensitized rats and food-allergic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32397
Source
Allergy. 2000 Mar;55(3):251-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
L M Knippels
H P van der Kleij
S J Koppelman
G F Houben
A H Penninks
Author Affiliation
TNO Nutrition and Food Research Institute, Zeist, The Netherlands.
Source
Allergy. 2000 Mar;55(3):251-8
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Blotting, Western
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Dietary Proteins - immunology
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Food Hypersensitivity - immunology
Humans
Immune system
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Infant
Male
Milk - adverse effects
Milk Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Milk Proteins - immunology
Ovalbumin - immunology
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: No adequate enteral sensitization models are available to study food allergy and the allergenicity of food proteins. To further validate an enteral brown Norway (BN) rat sensitization model under development, we studied specific protein recognition to determine whether a comparable pattern of proteins is recognized by the rat immune system and the human immune system. METHODS: The animals were exposed to either ovalbumin as a positive reference control, hen's egg-white-protein extract, or a cow's milk preparation by daily gavage dosing (0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, or 15 mg protein per rat/day) for 9 weeks. No adjuvants were used during the sensitization studies. The specificities of antibodies against hen's egg-white proteins or cow's-milk proteins in sera from orally sensitized rats and food-allergic patients were studied and compared by immunoblotting. RESULTS: The IgG and IgE antibodies to hen's egg-white proteins and cow's-milk proteins present in sera from orally sensitized rats and food-allergic patients showed a comparable pattern of protein recognition. CONCLUSIONS: Upon daily intragastric exposure to food allergens, the specificities of the induced antibody responses in the BN rat resemble those found in food-allergic patients. These studies add further support to the hypothesis that the BN rat may provide a suitable animal model for food allergy research and research on the allergenicity of food proteins.
PubMed ID
10753016 View in PubMed
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Effect of TEI-9874, an inhibitor of immunoglobulin E production, on allergen-induced asthmatic model in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15560
Source
Eur J Pharmacol. 2000 Aug 25;402(3):287-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-2000
Author
T. Nonaka
H. Mitsuhashi
K. Takahashi
H. Sugiyama
T. Kishimoto
Author Affiliation
Teijin Institute for Bio-Medical Research, 4-3-2, Asahigaoka, Hino, 191-8512, Tokyo, Japan.
Source
Eur J Pharmacol. 2000 Aug 25;402(3):287-95
Date
Aug-25-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - pharmacology
Asthma - chemically induced - prevention & control
Benzeneacetamides
Benzoic Acids - pharmacology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - chemically induced - prevention & control
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - biosynthesis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis - biosynthesis
Indicators and Reagents
Methacholine Chloride - pharmacology
Naphthalenes - pharmacology
Ovalbumin - immunology - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Respiratory Mechanics - drug effects
Abstract
As TEI-9874, 2-(4-(6-cyclohexyloxy-2-naphtyloxy)phenylacetamide)ben zoic acid reduces allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro, we evaluated its potency on an allergen-induced asthmatic model in Brown-Norway rats. Inhaled ovalbumin induced the immediate-phase asthmatic response, the late-phase asthmatic response, the infiltration of leukocytes into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and an increase of serum anti-ovalbumin IgE. These parameters were suppressed by the treatment with TEI-9874 (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg p.o.). The ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was prevented by TEI-9874 (30 mg/kg p.o.). Furthermore, the suppression of the immediate-phase asthmatic response and the late-phase asthmatic response by TEI-9874 was almost completely extinguished by the exogenous administration of rat anti-ovalbumin antiserum. These results indicate that the efficacy of TEI-9874 on the asthmatic response is mainly mediated by the suppression of allergen-specific IgE production and TEI-9874 appears to be a good candidate as therapy for IgE-mediated allergic asthma.
PubMed ID
10958896 View in PubMed
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Experimental immune-mediated blepharoconjunctivitis in rats induced by immunization with ragweed pollen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50871
Source
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2000 Apr;238(4):346-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
H. Iwamoto
K. Nishino
T M Magone
S M Whitcup
O. Yoshida
H. Yoshida
A. Ozaki
A. Fukushima
H. Ueno
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Kochi Medical School, Nankoku, Japan.
Source
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2000 Apr;238(4):346-51
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - adverse effects - immunology
Aluminum Hydroxide - adverse effects
Animals
Blepharitis - chemically induced - immunology - pathology
Comparative Study
Conjunctivitis - chemically induced - immunology - pathology
Emulsions
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Eosinophils - immunology
Freund's Adjuvant - adverse effects
Immunization - methods
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Interferon Type II - biosynthesis
Lymphocyte Activation - immunology
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis - immunology
Plant Proteins - adverse effects - immunology
Pollen - adverse effects - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Th1 Cells - immunology
Th2 Cells - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A study was performed to compare the effects of immunization with ragweed pollen (RW) in two different adjuvants on the characteristics of a previously described model of experimental immune-mediated blepharoconjunctivitis (EC) in rats. METHODS: Lewis or Brown Norway (BN) rats were immunized with 100 microg of RW in emulsion with aluminum hydroxide [Al(OH)3] or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Three weeks later, the animals were challenged with eye drops containing RW in PBS. Twenty-four hours after topical challenge, eyes, blood, and lymph nodes were obtained for histology, measurement of antigen-specific antibodies, and proliferation or cytokine assays, respectively. In addition to active immunization, recipients of RW-primed lymph node cells were challenged and evaluated as above. RESULTS: RW in both adjuvants induced infiltration with predominantly mononuclear cells in Lewis rats and eosinophils in BN rats. As well as active immunization, eosinophils were detected only in BN rats by adoptive transfer of cells. Lymphocyte proliferative responses to RW were high in immunized Lewis rats when CFA was used as an adjuvant. In contrast, proliferative responses in BN rats were higher when Al(OH)3 was used. RW-specific IgE was detected only in BN rats. There were no significant differences in RW-specific IgG1/IgG2a ratio among the four groups. Lewis rats had higher level of RW-specific interferon-gamma in the culture supernatant. CONCLUSIONS: The characteristics of EC are different in Lewis and BN rats, dependent on the genetic background of the rat strains. The response to RW was similar to other previously used antigens, such as ovalbumin.
PubMed ID
10853935 View in PubMed
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Genetic background determines the nature of immune responses and experimental immune-mediated blepharoconjunctivitis (EC).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50932
Source
Curr Eye Res. 1999 Feb;18(2):117-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
O. Yoshida
H. Yoshida
H. Iwamoto
K. Nishino
A. Fukushima
H. Ueno
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Kochi Medical School, Japan.
Source
Curr Eye Res. 1999 Feb;18(2):117-24
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum Hydroxide - immunology
Animals
Antibody Formation - genetics
Blepharitis - genetics - immunology
Conjunctivitis - genetics - immunology
Cytokines - metabolism
Disease Models, Animal
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Freund's Adjuvant - immunology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - immunology
Immunity, Cellular
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Lymph Nodes - cytology
Lymphocyte Activation - immunology
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN - genetics - immunology
Rats, Inbred Lew - genetics - immunology
Th1 Cells - immunology
Th2 Cells - immunology
Abstract
PURPOSE: Experimental immune-mediated blepharoconjunctivitis (EC) was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with ovalbumin (OVA) in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or aluminum hydroxide [Al(OH)3]. To investigate the affect of genetic factors on the susceptibility of EC, we tested different strains of rats for the development of EC. METHODS: Lewis and Brown Norway (BN) rats were immunized once with 100 microg of OVA in CFA or Al(OH)3. Three weeks later they were challenged with OVA in eye drops; 24 hours after the challenge they were sacrificed and their eyes, blood, and lymph nodes were harvested for histological studies, measurement of OVA-specific antibodies (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgE), and proliferation or cytokine assay, respectively. ELISA was used to detect OVA-specific IgG; passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was used for detecting IgE. RESULTS: EC, OVA-specific IgG, and cellular immunity were induced in Lewis rats by using either adjuvant, whereas IgE was not produced by either adjuvant. In contrast, IgE was produced in BN rats using either adjuvant, whereas cellular immunity was evoked only when CFA was used. Less cellular infiltration as well as cellular proliferation was detected in BN rats immunized with Al(OH)3. In both strains, Al(OH)3 induced a higher IgG1/IgG2a ratio than did CFA. More interferon-gamma by stimulation with OVA was noted in Lewis rats compared to BN rats, whereas interleukin-4 was detected only in BN rats. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of EC evaluated by cellular infiltration was dependent on OVA-specific cellular immunity. Genetic background is more important than adjuvants in determining the nature of EC and immunity.
PubMed ID
10223655 View in PubMed
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Hyposensitization attenuates airway inflammation and antigen-induced proliferative response by lymphocytes in a rat model of bronchial asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15701
Source
Respiration. 1998;65(6):469-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
N. Ohnuma
E. Yamaguchi
M. Oguri
Y. Kawakami
Author Affiliation
First Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
Source
Respiration. 1998;65(6):469-75
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylcholine - pharmacology
Animals
Antigens - immunology
Asthma - immunology - therapy
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Desensitization, Immunologic
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Lung - pathology
Lymphocyte Activation
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Abstract
The mechanism of hyposensitization in bronchial asthma has not been fully elucidated. We established a hyposensitization model of bronchial asthma in rats and examined airway responses and immunological parameters. Brown Norway rats were sensitized by a subcutaneous injection of ovalbumin (OA) at day 1 and by the inhalation of 2% OA aerosol at day 15. Animals were hyposensitized by intraperitoneal injections of OA from day 17 to day 22. They were challenged with OA or acethylcholine (Ach) aerosol at day 23 and changes in intratracheal pressure were recorded. Lungs were lavaged and OA-induced proliferative responses by blood lymphocytes were examined for animals without aerosol challenge at day 23. OA-specific serum IgE levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hyposensitization significantly reduced the OA-induced immediate airway response, accumulation of CD4+ lymphocytes and eosinophils recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage, and the OA-induced proliferative response by blood lymphocytes. The airway responses to Ach and serum OA-specific IgE levels in hyposensitized group were not significantly different from those in the sensitized group. These results indicate that amelioration of airway inflammation and hyporesponsiveness of lymphocytes against OA are involved in the attenuated immediate antigen-induced airway response following hyposensitization.
PubMed ID
9817961 View in PubMed
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Immune-mediated effects upon oral challenge of ovalbumin-sensitized Brown Norway rats: further characterization of a rat food allergy model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57546
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1999 May 1;156(3):161-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1999
Author
L M Knippels
A H Penninks
J J Smit
G F Houben
Author Affiliation
TNO Nutrition and Food Research Institute, Zeist, The Netherlands.
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1999 May 1;156(3):161-9
Date
May-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood pressure
Disease Models, Animal
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Food Hypersensitivity - immunology - metabolism - physiopathology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Intestinal Absorption
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Mechanics
Abstract
Although several in vivo antigenicity assays using parenteral immunization are operational, no full validated enteral models are available to study food allergy and allergenicity of food proteins. To further validate a developed enteral Brown Norway (BN) rat food allergy model, systemic and local immune-mediated reactions were studied upon oral challenges. The animals were exposed to ovalbumin (OVA) by daily gavage dosing (1 mg OVA/rat/day) for 6 weeks, without the use of an adjuvant, or by intraperitoneal injections with OVA together with AL(OH)3. Subsequently, effects on breathing frequency, blood pressure, and gastrointestinal permeability were investigated upon an oral challenge with 10 to 100 mg OVA in vivo. In both parenterally and orally sensitized rats, an increase in gut permeability (increased passage of beta-lactoglobulin as bystander protein) was determined between 0.5 and 1 h after an oral OVA challenge was given. An oral challenge with OVA did not induce a clear effect on the respiratory system or blood pressure in the majority of the animals. However, some animals demonstrated a temporary decrease in breathing frequency or systolic blood pressure. Upon oral challenge with OVA of orally and parenterally sensitized animals, local effects were observed in all animals whereas systemic effects were observed at a low frequency, which reflects the situation in food allergic patients after an oral challenge. These studies show that the BN rat provides a suitable animal model to study oral sensitization to food proteins as well as immune-mediated effects after oral challenge with food proteins.
PubMed ID
10222308 View in PubMed
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Mast-cell activation augments the late phase reaction in experimental immune-mediated blepharoconjunctivitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50704
Source
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2003 May;241(5):394-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Akemi Ozaki
Atsuki Fukushima
Kazuyo Fukata
Hisayuki Ueno
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Kochi Medical School, Kohasu, Oko-cho, 783-8505 Nankoku-city, Japan.
Source
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2003 May;241(5):394-402
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blepharitis - chemically induced - immunology - pathology
Cell Movement
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - chemically induced - immunology - pathology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Eosinophilia - immunology
Eosinophils - physiology
Flow Cytometry
Hypersensitivity, Delayed - immunology - pathology
Lymphocyte Activation
Male
Mast Cells - physiology
Ovalbumin - immunology
RANTES - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
p-Methoxy-N-methylphenethylamine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: How the early phase allergic reaction affects the late phase reaction remains unclear. We examined this issue with an experimental model of allergic conjunctivitis that permits the two reactions to be disconnected from each other. METHODS: Experimental immune-mediated blepharoconjunctivitis (EC) was initiated in Brown Norway rats by transferring ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells and then challenging with OVA-containing eye drops. To induce early phase reaction, a mast-cell activator, C48/80, was challenged together with or without OVA. Rats were evaluated clinically and eyes were harvested for histologic examination and for evaluation of chemokine expression by reverse-transcriptase PCR. RESULTS: The rats challenged with OVA alone developed the T-cell-mediated late phase reaction histologically, but not clinically, in the absence of early phase reaction. While rats challenged with C48/80 with or without OVA exhibited clinical signs of the early phase reaction, the clinical late phase reaction was observed only in the OVA+C48/80 group. Eosinophilic infiltration into the conjunctiva during the late phase reaction of the OVA+C48/80 group markedly exceeded that of rats challenged with either OVA or C48/80 alone. RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), an eosinophil attractant, was expressed both in the OVA+C48/80 and OVA groups, while eotaxin was expressed at equivalent levels in all three groups. CONCLUSION: The mast-cell-mediated early phase reaction potentiates the T-cell-mediated late phase reaction, and RANTES is involved in eosinophilic infiltration induced by antigen-specific T cells. Other molecules induced by allergen-specific T cells activated in an as yet unknown manner by the mast cells may be responsible for the infiltration of eosinophils.
PubMed ID
12682842 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.