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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Publication Type
Report
Date
Apr-2009
  1 website  
Author
Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP)
Arctic peoples
Climate change
Communication
Community action
Environmental contaminants
Health promotion
Health Research
Human health
International Polar Year (IPY)
International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH)
Outreach
Prevention strategies
Abstract
The International Polar Year (IPY) represents a unique opportunity to focus world attention on Arctic human health and to further stimulate circumpolar cooperation on emerging Arctic human health concerns. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI) is an Arctic Council IPY initiative that aims to build and expand on existing Arctic Council and International Union for Circumpolar Health?s human health research activities. The human health legacy of the IPY will be increased visibility of the human health concerns of arctic communities, revitalization of cooperative arctic human health research focused on those concerns, the development of health policies based on research findings, and the subsequent implementation of appropriate interventions, prevention and control measures at the community level.
Online Resources
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Brain injuries in Alaska: 10-year TBI plan

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100733
Publication Type
Report
Date
Oct-2008
  1 website  
Author
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority
Alaska Brain Injury Network
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Acute rehabilitation
Advocacy
Alaska
Children and youth
Identification
Long-Term Care
Outreach
Planning and policies
Post-acute rehabilitation
Prevention
Referral
Service coordination
Service delivery system
TBI
Traumatic brain injury
Vocational rehabilitation
Abstract
The ABIN and partners recognize that a strong system of services that are timely and efficient will be dependent on interagency collaboration, common goals, and defined outcomes. Data across systems will be needed to assess progress toward the overall goal of this plan, which is to improve existing systems and expand services.
Online Resources
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Continuous and integrated health care services in rural areas: A literature study

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101090
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2007 Jul-Sep;7(3):766
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-Sep 2007
Author
Rygh, EM
Hjortdahl, P
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Telemedicine, Tromsoe, Norway
Department of General Practice/Family Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2007 Jul-Sep;7(3):766
Date
Jul-Sep 2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to care
Care pathways
Coherent services
Continuity and coordination of care
Definition of rurality
Equity
Healthcare services
Literature review
Outreach programs
Primary healthcare system
Rural areas
Shared care
Telemedicine
Abstract
This article presents the result of a literature review examining possible ways to improve healthcare services in rural areas. While there is abundant literature on making healthcare programs integrated, interdisciplinary and managed in order to reduce fragmentation and improve continuity and coordination of care, only some part of this relates to rural issues. An added challenge is the lack of a generally accepted international definition of rurality, which makes it difficult to generalise from one region to another, and to develop an evidence-based understanding of rural health care. In evaluating the literature it was found that the development of new forms of interaction is particularly relevant in rural regions - such as interdisciplinary and team-based work with flexibility of roles and responsibilities, delegation of tasks and cultural adjustments. In addition, programs such as integrated and managed care pathways, outreach programs , shared care and telemedicine were relevant initiatives. These may be associated with greater equity in access to care, and more coherent services with greater continuity, but they are not necessarily linked to reduced costs; they may, in some cases, entail additional expenses. Such endeavours are, to a large degree, dependent on a well-functioning primary healthcare system as a base.
PubMed ID
17650058 View in PubMed
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Knowledgeable, consistent, competent care: Meeting the challenges of delivering quality cancer care in remote northern communities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102302
Source
Pages 196-204 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Bay. Ontario Canada, 2Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada lntanatiooal Journal of Circumpolar Health ABSTRACT The Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre (NWORCC) has created outreach services that provide chemotherapy and sup- portive care to
  1 document  
Author
Minore, B
Hill, M.E
Kurm, M.J
Vergidis, D
Author Affiliation
Centre for Rural and Northern Health Research, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
Source
Pages 196-204 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Chemotherapy
Competency
Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre (NWORCC)
Oncology services
Outreach services
Resources
Staffing
Supportive care
Abstract
The Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre (NWORCC) has created outreach services that provide chemotherapy and supportive care to clients in thirteen small, remote communities. Located 100-600 km from NWORCC, these satellite oncology services are staffed by local physicians, specially prepared nurses, and support staff. The present paper reports selected findings from an evaluation of the service, based on two rounds of site visits, interviews, and surveys of providers and clients. Although the consensus was that quality care was being delivered, local hospitals and other organizations had to address a variety of challenges. Those discussed in the paper include: maintaining provider competency, strengthening supportive care networks, and adjusting staffing and other resources to meet increased demands for care.
Documents
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The Northern Mental Health Outreach Project: Evaluation results, issues and recommendations

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102219
Source
Pages 483-490 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
/l/CtU Medical Research Wll. 53: Suppl. 2, pp. 483-490, 1994 The Northern Mental Health Outreach Project: Evaluation Results, Issues and Recommendations J Rogers, SJJ Freeman, J Cochrane and P Goering The Health Systems Research Unit, Clarke Institute of Psychiatry and University of Toronto
  1 document  
Author
Rogers, J
Freeman, S.J.J
Cochrane, J
Goering, P
Author Affiliation
The Health Systems Research Unit, Clarke Institute of Psychiatry and University of Toronto, Canada
Source
Pages 483-490 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Manitoba
Mental health
Native communities
Nurse practitioners
Nurses
Outreach
Services
Abstract
The authors are outside evaluators for an innovative program which uses experienced mental health nurse practitioners to provide a range of mental health services to remote Native communities in Manitoba. Native and local representatives are involved in designing and implementing the program, which aims to transfer skills, knowledge, and decision-making about mental health services to local communities. This paper describes evaluation methods and mid-term findings. Impediments to evaluation (funding restraints, distance, and trust issues) are discussed together with approaches used to deal with them. Results to date provide strong indications that the program is fulfilling its goals and objectives and is having a positive impact on the communities involved. The evaluation has been a useful tool for identifying areas for improvement and future service directions and priorities.
Documents
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The Northern Mental Health Outreach Project (NMHOP): Historical and conceptual background for a demonstration project in northern community mental health outreach

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102216
Source
Pages 467-473 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Aldic Utdical Research rtJI. 53 Suppl. 2, pp. 467-473, 1994 The Northern Mental Health Outreach Project (NMHOP): Historical and Conceptual Background for a Demonstration Project in Northern Community Mental Health Outreach Barry Miller IA ffildcs N~rn Medical Unit, University of Manitoba
  1 document  
Author
Miller, B
Author Affiliation
J.A. Hildes Northern Medical Unit, University of Manitoba, Canada
Source
Pages 467-473 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Aboriginal peoples
Canada
Colonialism
Community
Empowerment
First Nations
Health Policy
Health programs
Mental health
NMHOP
Outreach
Self-determination
Abstract
NMHOP planning was undertaken in the aftermath of memorable 1990 Canadian sociopolitical events which aligned First Nations against the Conservative majority government. Canadian colonial history restricted Native people to unequal marginal participation in the socioeconomic benefits bestowed on other Canadian citizens. This paper discusses the theoretical bases undergirding NMHOP's architecture, including: the history of colonialism and its disempowering effects on individual and community; tile cultural clash of aboriginal/Euro-Canadian worldviews; the historic neglect of a Canadian Native mental health policy; and the importance of fundamental equality and freedom of choice as minimal structural conditions upon which the mental health of individuals depends. The paper concludes with extraction or inference of eight general grounding principles for a Native community mental health outreach project, with "empowerment" the architectonic one implicit in each of the others.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.