Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

Comparison of user assessed needs for care between psychiatric inpatients and supported community residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71501
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2002 Dec;16(4):406-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
D. Brunt
L. Hansson
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden. david.brunt@ivosa.vxu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2002 Dec;16(4):406-13
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Deinstitutionalization
Female
Halfway Houses - standards
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Psychiatric - standards
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Outpatients - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residential Treatment - standards
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare user assessed needs for care for psychiatric patients in inpatient settings with that of residents in supported community residences. The Camberwell Assessment of Need was administered to 75 patients and residents in different housing settings. Residents in supported community settings had more needs for care (8.1), than patients in inpatient settings (5.8), partly because of differences in duration of illness. A greater proportion of those living in supported community residences reported needs in the areas of psychotic symptoms, accommodation, food, daytime activities, sexual expression and looking after the home. There were no differences in numbers of unmet needs. Relatives and friends provided emotional and social support predominantly in the areas of company and psychological distress. In conclusion, living in supported community residences does not imply more unmet needs, or less adequate response to needs from services, despite a greater number of needs being reported. In some areas of need, relatives and friends play an important role in the provision of support.
PubMed ID
12445111 View in PubMed
Less detail

The construct validity of a self-report questionnaire focusing on health promotion interventions in mental health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83607
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2007 Sep;14(6):566-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Svedberg P.
Svensson B.
Arvidsson B.
Hansson L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. petra.svedberg@lthalland.se
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2007 Sep;14(6):566-72
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Helping Behavior
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Needs Assessment
Outpatients - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Regression Analysis
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Health promotion has become a widespread concept, although little empirical research as to its importance and outcome has been performed in the mental health field. The aim of the present study was to investigate the construct validity of a newly developed Health Promotion Intervention Questionnaire, intended to measure patients' subjectively experienced health-promoting interventions within mental health services. A total of 135 participants responded to the questionnaire and to validation measures assessing psychiatric symptoms, empowerment, helping alliance and satisfaction with care. Bivariate correlations showed that overall perceived health-promoting interventions were positively correlated to, helping alliance, client satisfaction with care and empowerment. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the strongest relationship was found between perceived health promotion intervention and helping alliance. In conclusion, the construct validity of the scale was satisfactory, except for one of its subscales where further investigations are needed.
PubMed ID
17718729 View in PubMed
Less detail

COPE-ICD: patient experience of participation in an ICD specific rehabilitation programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135035
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2012 Jun;11(2):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Selina Kikkenborg Berg
Birthe D Pedersen
Jesper Hastrup Svendsen
Ann-Dorthe Zwisler
Louise Kristensen
Preben Ulrich Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, The Heart Center, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2012 Jun;11(2):207-15
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Defibrillators, Implantable - psychology
Denmark
Exercise Therapy - nursing - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Outpatients - psychology
Patient Participation - psychology
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Rehabilitation Centers - organization & administration
Rehabilitation Nursing - organization & administration
Abstract
Evaluating rehabilitation programmes from the patient's perspective is much needed, as the patients are the most important stakeholders in the health care system. A comprehensive rehabilitation programme, COPE-ICD programme, consists of exercise training and nursing consultations during a one year period post ICD implantation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the experience and meaning of participating in a comprehensive ICD-specific rehabilitation programme.
Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 patients representing the participating population, and later transcribed. The analysis was inspired by Ricoeur's theory of interpretation, which consists of three levels: naive reading, structured analysis and critical interpretation and discussion.
The overall concept was that participating in the COPE-ICD programme meant feeling inspired and secure through individualized care. Four themes emerged: Knowledge: patients gained much needed understanding; Physical attention: patients interpreted body signals and adjusted their exercise behaviour; Trust: patients regained trust, felt secure and dared to live again; Strategies of living: patients' coping was supported through reflection and professional dialogue, and they dealt with the risk of shock or death.
Participating in an ICD-specific rehabilitation programme can make patients feel inspired and secure through individualized care. They discover that they have to rethink some of their strategies of living and they gain support in the reflection and coping needed for that. Patients gain insight and they develop a special physical attention whereby they continue healthy activities through interpreting body signals and adjusting exercise behaviour. They learn to trust their body again.
PubMed ID
21514891 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differences in adherence and motivation to HIV therapy--two independent assessments in 1998 and 2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80062
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2006 Aug;28(4):248-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Södergård Björn
Halvarsson Margit
Lindbäck Stefan
Sönnerborg Anders
Tully Mary P
Lindblad Asa Kettis
Author Affiliation
Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research Group, Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Box 580, Uppsala 751 23, Sweden. bjorn.sodergard@farmaci.uu.se
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2006 Aug;28(4):248-56
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - psychology
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Motivation
Outpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation - methods
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the level of adherence and motivation in two independent cross-sectional samples of HIV-infected patients conducted in 1998 and 2002, and to investigate the relationship between adherence and motivation. METHOD: Consecutive HIV-infected patients on treatment at a Swedish clinic were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire. In 1998, 60 patients participated and in 2002, 53 participated. In 2002, the 9-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) was added to the questionnaire set. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Self-reported adherence and motivation. RESULTS: In 1998, 28.1% of the respondents were considered adherent, while the corresponding proportion was 57.4% in 2002 (P = 0.002). The mean summary score for MMAS was 10.7 in 2002 (13 = perfect adherence). The proportion considered motivated were 22.4% in the 1998 survey and 41.3% in 2002 (P = 0.038). Of the respondents considered motivated in the 2002 survey, 46.7% scored the maximum summary score on the MMAS, while 8.7% of the non-motivated respondents did so (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: The respondents in 2002 were more adherent and motivated than the respondents in 1998 and a relationship between motivation and adherence was found. The difference in adherence and motivation might be due to a new treatment model at the clinic.
PubMed ID
17066240 View in PubMed
Less detail

The experience of fatigue among elderly women with chronic heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93648
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Dec;7(4):290-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Hägglund Lena
Boman Kurt
Lundman Berit
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.hagglund@nurs.umu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Dec;7(4):290-5
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease
Fatigue - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Heart Failure - complications
Humans
Intention
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Outpatients - psychology
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Support
Sweden
Women - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common and distressing symptom in chronic heart failure (CHF). Most of the current methods for evaluating patients' symptoms fail to consider the meaning or importance that these symptoms have for the patient. AIM: To illuminate the lived experience of fatigue among elderly women with CHF. METHOD: Narrative interviews were conducted with 10 women with CHF, aged 73-89 years. Interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The findings are presented in two themes and five subthemes. The first theme, 'living with the loss of physical energy', was based on three subthemes describing the experience of fatigue: 'experiencing a substantial presence of feebleness and unfamiliar bodily sensations', 'experiencing unpredictable variations in physical ability', and 'needing help from others in daily life'. The second theme, 'striving for independence while being aware of deteriorating health', describes how the women managed their life situation; it was based on two subthemes: 'acknowledging one's remaining abilities', and 'being forced to adjust and struggle for independence'. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue was experienced as loss of physical energy, leading to discrepancies between intention and capacity. The will to reduce dependency on others involved a daily struggle against fatigue.
PubMed ID
18262844 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fear in children with cancer: observations at an outpatient visit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92642
Source
J Child Health Care. 2008 Sep;12(3):191-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Anderzén Carlsson Agneta
Sørlie Venke
Gustafsson Karin
Olsson Maria
Kihlgren Mona
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Care Sciences, Orebro University Hospital and Institution of Clinical Medicine, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. agneta.anderzen-karlsson@orebroll.se
Source
J Child Health Care. 2008 Sep;12(3):191-208
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Ambulatory Care - methods - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Child, Preschool
Empathy
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Outpatients - psychology
Parents - psychology
Personnel, Hospital - psychology
Professional Role - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe interactions within the family and between them and professionals on a routine visit at a paediatric oncology outpatient clinic where the visiting child was likely to be fearful. Observations were performed. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The behaviours most frequently observed as expressing fear were being quiet, withdrawn or providing detailed descriptions of experiences. Within the theme ;Recognition of the fear', an attentive attitude to the fear was traced; fear was confirmed and cooperation was seen. Although many efforts were made to meet the fear, this was not always successful. Within the theme ;Lack of attention to the fear', the fear was not in focus due to parental worries and concerns about the child's health, and organizational disturbances. The results can serve as a basis for collegial reflections of how to handle fear in children with cancer.
PubMed ID
18678582 View in PubMed
Less detail

Global perceived health and health-related quality of life in elderly primary care patients with symptoms of heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93679
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Dec;7(4):269-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Johansson Peter
Broström Anders
Dahlström Ulf
Alehagen Urban
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Dec;7(4):269-76
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Echocardiography, Doppler
Female
Health status
Heart Failure - psychology - ultrasonography
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Nursing Assessment - methods
Outpatients - psychology
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care
Prognosis
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires - standards
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke Volume
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim was to examine whether a single question about global perceived health (GPH) is associated with the domains of health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) as assessed by the SF-36, and whether the scores in these domains differ from the different scores of the GPH in relation to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). METHOD: The study included 412 elderly outpatients with symptoms of heart failure (HF). Echocardiography was used to determine their LVEF, and GPH was assessed by the first question on the SF-36. RESULTS: The correlations between GPH and the different domains in SF-36 ranged from 0.33 to 0.64 in patients with LVEF>or=50% and was between 0.29 and 0.59 in patients with LVEF
PubMed ID
18249036 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intermittent care for old patients--when should it be offered?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73937
Source
Compr Gerontol [B]. 1988 Dec;2(3):135-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988
Author
H. Berthold
S. Landahl
A. Svanborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric and Long-Term Care Medicine, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Compr Gerontol [B]. 1988 Dec;2(3):135-40
Date
Dec-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Intermediate Care Facilities
Male
Nursing Homes
Outpatients - psychology
Patient transfer
Sweden
Abstract
An inventory was made among 229 elderly individuals in out- and in-patient care, community care and social welfare. The aim was to investigate the patients' possibilities and interest for intermittent nursing home care in order to avoid or postpone permanent institutional care. The patients were assessed as to physical and mental health and social conditions. Intermittent care was thought to be appropriate for 81 of these patients (35%). After an interview of the patients and cohabiting relatives, 21 patients (9%), mainly out-patients, took a positive interest in this form of care. The in-patients were mostly too ill, and patients in community care found intermittent care interesting but were not prepared for this form of rehabilitation and preferred to wait despite risk of acute deterioration. The most suitable and interested patients and relatives were found among those in day hospital and those on the waiting list for geriatric care.
PubMed ID
3228808 View in PubMed
Less detail

Olfactory changes among patients receiving chemotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91131
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2009 Feb;13(1):9-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Bernhardson Britt-Marie
Tishelman Carol
Rutqvist Lars Erik
Author Affiliation
Department NVS, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. britt-marie.bernhardson@ki.se
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2009 Feb;13(1):9-15
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - drug therapy
Nursing Methodology Research
Olfaction Disorders - chemically induced - epidemiology - psychology
Outpatients - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Taste Disorders - chemically induced - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Taste and smell changes (TSCs) are known side effects of chemotherapy, but smell changes (SCs) in the absence of taste changes are understudied. This study aims to explore SCs occurring without taste changes during chemotherapy, to better understand the characteristics of such changes, and how these experiences affect patients in their daily lives. Data derives from a qualitative interview study and a cross-sectional survey of 518 patients, with all patients receiving out-patient cancer chemotherapy in Sweden. Case studies of three patients with SCs and the 8% of survey participants with SCs only are in focus. All 43 participants with exclusively SCs reported increased sensitivity to one or several odors, with no participants reporting decreased sensitivity. Those reporting SCs significantly more often reported weight gain than those reporting TSCs, with oral problems and appetite loss significantly less common in the SC group. There were no differences in reported nausea between SC and TSC groups, but nausea was more common in the SC group than in those without TSCs. The case study reports were linked to and discussed in relation to possible explanatory models for increased olfactory sensitivity. SCs increase during chemotherapy, were often unpredictable and led to emotional consequences. The participants all reported heightened sensitivity to one or several odors which could not fully be explained by the potential explanatory models of anticipatory nausea and vomiting, pseudohallucinations, or increased chemical sensitivity.
PubMed ID
19028142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patients' perspective of factors influencing quality of life while living with Crohn disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98102
Source
Gastroenterol Nurs. 2010 Jan-Feb;33(1):37-44; quiz 45-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katarina Pihl-Lesnovska
Henrik Hjortswang
Anna-Christina Ek
Gunilla Hollman Frisman
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. Katarina.Pihl.Lesnovska@lio.se
Source
Gastroenterol Nurs. 2010 Jan-Feb;33(1):37-44; quiz 45-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Cost of Illness
Crohn Disease - complications - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Outpatients - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. The chronic, relapsing nature of Crohn disease produces physical, psychological, and social stress. The disease occurs early in life, and the effects of Crohn disease on daily life are associated with symptom burden; thus, managing their disease and coping with its impact is a lifelong process for sufferers. This study was undertaken to identify and describe the meaning of quality of life in patients with Crohn disease. Using a grounded theory methodology, 11 interviews were performed with 6 men and 5 women, 29-83 years of age, all suffering from Crohn disease. The experience of quality of life was associated with limitations in daily activity, the major theme that emerged from the analysis. Quality of life varied depending on how the patient managed limitations related to the symptoms of the disease. The categories of self-image, confirmatory relations, powerlessness, attitude toward life, and sense of well-being were conceptualized as the dominant themes derived from the data. When caring for these patients, it is important to identify limitations and provide support so that patients are able to maintain a daily life that can be perceived as normal and routine.
PubMed ID
20145449 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.