Skip header and navigation

Refine By

16 records – page 1 of 2.

Alcohol and drug use, smoking, and gambling among psychiatric outpatients: a 1-year prevalence study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114803
Source
Subst Abus. 2013;34(2):162-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christina Nehlin
Leif Grönbladh
Anders Fredriksson
Lennart Jansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry Unit, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. christina.nehlin.gordh@neuro.uu
Source
Subst Abus. 2013;34(2):162-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gambling - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Prevalence
Sex Characteristics
Smoking - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Studies of alcohol habits in general psychiatric populations are scarce. The objective was to investigate alcohol and drug use, smoking, and gambling in a clinical sample of psychiatric outpatients. A further aim was to study age and gender differences in the rates of these habits.
Data were collected among psychiatric outpatients with mainly mood (47%) and anxiety (35%) disorders. A questionnaire package was distributed, including AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test), DUDIT (Drug Use Disorders Identification Test), tobacco items, and gambling items. Two major drinking categories were formed: "Nonhazardous alcohol use" (NH) and "Alcohol use above hazardous levels" (AH).
In total, 2160 patients (65% females) responded to the questionnaire package. The AH rate was high among psychiatric outpatients (28.4%), particularly among young females (46.6%). Young female patients also reported a high prevalence of problematic drug use (13.8%). Problematic drug use, daily smoking, and problematic gambling were frequent. The unhealthy habits were linked to AH.
Alcohol and drug use, smoking, and gambling are all highly prevalent among psychiatric outpatients. Young females are in particular need of attention. Interventions should be tailored for co-occurring psychiatric disorders and applied within routine psychiatric care.
PubMed ID
23577911 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing quality of life in a clinical study on heart rehabilitation patients: how well do value sets based on given or experienced health states reflect patients' valuations?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276518
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2016;14:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Reiner Leidl
Bernd Schweikert
Harry Hahmann
Juergen M Steinacker
Peter Reitmeir
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2016;14:48
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - psychology - rehabilitation
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life - psychology
Regression Analysis
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Quality of life as an endpoint in a clinical study may be sensitive to the value set used to derive a single score. Focusing on patients' actual valuations in a clinical study, we compare different value sets for the EQ-5D-3L and assess how well they reproduce patients' reported results.
A clinical study comparing inpatient (n = 98) and outpatient (n = 47) rehabilitation of patients after an acute coronary event is re-analyzed. Value sets include: 1. Given health states and time-trade-off valuation (GHS-TTO) rendering economic utilities; 2. Experienced health states and valuation by visual analog scale (EHS-VAS). Valuations are compared with patient-reported VAS rating. Accuracy is assessed by mean absolute error (MAE) and by Pearson's correlation ?. External validity is tested by correlation with established MacNew global scores. Drivers of differences between value sets and VAS are analyzed using repeated measures regression.
EHS-VAS had smaller MAEs and higher ? in all patients and in the inpatient group, and correlated best with MacNew global score. Quality-adjusted survival was more accurately reflected by EHS-VAS. Younger, better educated patients reported lower VAS at admission than the EHS-based value set. EHS-based estimates were mostly able to reproduce patient-reported valuation. Economic utility measurement is conceptually different, produced results less strongly related to patients' reports, and resulted in about 20 % longer quality-adjusted survival.
Decision makers should take into account the impact of choosing value sets on effectiveness results. For transferring the results of heart rehabilitation patients from another country or from another valuation method, the EHS-based value set offers a promising estimation option for those decision makers who prioritize patient-reported valuation. Yet, EHS-based estimates may not fully reflect patient-reported VAS in all situations.
Notes
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2015 Feb;24(2):513-2025124253
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2002 Mar;11(2):173-8312018740
Cites: Rehabilitation (Stuttg). 2003 Dec;42(6):343-914677105
Cites: J Health Econ. 1986 Mar;5(1):1-3010311607
Cites: Heart. 2006 Jan;92(1):62-715797936
Cites: Health Econ. 2006 Jul;15(7):653-6416498700
Cites: Med Care. 2009 Feb;47(2):255-6119169128
Cites: Value Health. 2009 Mar;12 Suppl 1:S5-919250132
Cites: Pharmacoeconomics. 2009;27(9):767-7919757870
Cites: Eur J Health Econ. 2005 Jun;6(2):124-3019787848
Cites: Clin Res Cardiol. 2009 Dec;98(12):787-9519821135
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2010;8:1320109189
Cites: Med Decis Making. 2010 Jul-Aug;30(4):E57-6320511562
Cites: Swiss Med Wkly. 2011;140:w1314121213150
Cites: Health Econ. 2011 Mar;20(3):348-6121308856
Cites: Value Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;12(5):750-819490564
Cites: Pharmacoeconomics. 2011 Jun;29(6):521-3421247225
Cites: Value Health. 2012 Jan;15(1):151-722264983
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2012 Sep;21(7):1205-1621971874
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2014 Mar;23(2):431-4223975375
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2015 Mar;24(3):693-70325246184
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2014 Jun;85(3):244-924786908
Cites: Value Health. 2014 Jun;17(4):364-7124968996
Cites: Eur J Health Econ. 2014 Jul;15(6):577-8923771769
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 May;11(5):4939-5224810579
PubMed ID
27005466 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between self-reported care needs and the allocation of care in Norwegian home nursing care recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134023
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2012 Mar;7(1):20-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Hans Inge Saevareid
Elin Thygesen
Torill Christine Lindstrom
Harald A Nygaard
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Arendal, Norway. hans.i.savareid@uia.no
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2012 Mar;7(1):20-8
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Community Health Nursing - methods - standards
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Geriatric Nursing - methods - standards
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Norway
Outpatients - psychology
Self Report
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study investigated the relationship between patients' self-reported illness, daily afflictions, and the frequency of home nursing care, and whether patients' coping resources influenced the allocation of care. DESIGN, SAMPLE AND MEASUREMENTS: A cross-sectional survey was adopted. Two hundred and forty-two people aged 75 years and above receiving home nursing care participated in the study. Binary logistic regression model was used to test the effects of the independent variables on home nursing care.
Poor capacity to perform activities of daily living and high level of education were directly associated with a high frequency of home nursing care. Lack of perceived social support affected the amount of home nursing care allocated only when feelings of loneliness were connected with poor activities of daily living functioning. Interaction effects revealed that perceived social support influenced the amount of home nursing care in persons with higher education, in persons with low education, no such association were found. No associations were found between coping resources and home nursing care.
Impaired capacity to perform activities of daily living was the main reason for care allocation. Education was associated with more formal care. Patients with low perceived social support combined with a low education level was a particularly vulnerable group.
PubMed ID
21631880 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dermatology life quality index: data from Danish inpatients and outpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196976
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2000 Jul-Aug;80(4):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Zachariae
C. Zachariae
H. Ibsen
J T Mortensen
H C Wulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Aarhus, Denmark. bobby@psy.au.dk
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2000 Jul-Aug;80(4):272-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Female
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Skin Diseases - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to provide data on the reliability and validity of a Danish translation of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), a short measure of the impact of dermatological diseases on quality of life. The DLQI was administered to 200 outpatients and 100 hospitalized patients suffering from a range of dermatological diseases and to 100 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Mean scores, internal consistency and test-retest reliability were comparable to the results reported for the original English version. Hospitalized patients reported greater impairment of disease-related quality of life than outpatients, and patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis exhibited greater scores than patients suffering from other dermatological diseases. Discriminant, construct and predictive validities of the Danish translation of the DLQI were satisfactory, as indicated by significant associations between DLQI scores and physician-rated disease severity, disease duration and the time patients were willing to spend each day on a hypothetical effective treatment. The results also suggest that the emphasis Danish patients place on various aspects of disability covered by the questionnaire is similar to that of English patients. In conclusion, the Danish translation of the DLQI showed satisfactory reliability and the preliminary results indicate that this version is a valid measure, which can be used in both research and clinical settings.
PubMed ID
11028860 View in PubMed
Less detail

The experience of fatigue among elderly women with chronic heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93648
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Dec;7(4):290-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Hägglund Lena
Boman Kurt
Lundman Berit
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.hagglund@nurs.umu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Dec;7(4):290-5
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease
Fatigue - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Heart Failure - complications
Humans
Intention
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Outpatients - psychology
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Support
Sweden
Women - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common and distressing symptom in chronic heart failure (CHF). Most of the current methods for evaluating patients' symptoms fail to consider the meaning or importance that these symptoms have for the patient. AIM: To illuminate the lived experience of fatigue among elderly women with CHF. METHOD: Narrative interviews were conducted with 10 women with CHF, aged 73-89 years. Interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The findings are presented in two themes and five subthemes. The first theme, 'living with the loss of physical energy', was based on three subthemes describing the experience of fatigue: 'experiencing a substantial presence of feebleness and unfamiliar bodily sensations', 'experiencing unpredictable variations in physical ability', and 'needing help from others in daily life'. The second theme, 'striving for independence while being aware of deteriorating health', describes how the women managed their life situation; it was based on two subthemes: 'acknowledging one's remaining abilities', and 'being forced to adjust and struggle for independence'. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue was experienced as loss of physical energy, leading to discrepancies between intention and capacity. The will to reduce dependency on others involved a daily struggle against fatigue.
PubMed ID
18262844 View in PubMed
Less detail

Global perceived health and health-related quality of life in elderly primary care patients with symptoms of heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93679
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Dec;7(4):269-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Johansson Peter
Broström Anders
Dahlström Ulf
Alehagen Urban
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Dec;7(4):269-76
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Echocardiography, Doppler
Female
Health status
Heart Failure - psychology - ultrasonography
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Nursing Assessment - methods
Outpatients - psychology
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care
Prognosis
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires - standards
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke Volume
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim was to examine whether a single question about global perceived health (GPH) is associated with the domains of health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) as assessed by the SF-36, and whether the scores in these domains differ from the different scores of the GPH in relation to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). METHOD: The study included 412 elderly outpatients with symptoms of heart failure (HF). Echocardiography was used to determine their LVEF, and GPH was assessed by the first question on the SF-36. RESULTS: The correlations between GPH and the different domains in SF-36 ranged from 0.33 to 0.64 in patients with LVEF>or=50% and was between 0.29 and 0.59 in patients with LVEF
PubMed ID
18249036 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intermittent care for old patients--when should it be offered?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73937
Source
Compr Gerontol [B]. 1988 Dec;2(3):135-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988
Author
H. Berthold
S. Landahl
A. Svanborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric and Long-Term Care Medicine, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Compr Gerontol [B]. 1988 Dec;2(3):135-40
Date
Dec-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Intermediate Care Facilities
Male
Nursing Homes
Outpatients - psychology
Patient transfer
Sweden
Abstract
An inventory was made among 229 elderly individuals in out- and in-patient care, community care and social welfare. The aim was to investigate the patients' possibilities and interest for intermittent nursing home care in order to avoid or postpone permanent institutional care. The patients were assessed as to physical and mental health and social conditions. Intermittent care was thought to be appropriate for 81 of these patients (35%). After an interview of the patients and cohabiting relatives, 21 patients (9%), mainly out-patients, took a positive interest in this form of care. The in-patients were mostly too ill, and patients in community care found intermittent care interesting but were not prepared for this form of rehabilitation and preferred to wait despite risk of acute deterioration. The most suitable and interested patients and relatives were found among those in day hospital and those on the waiting list for geriatric care.
PubMed ID
3228808 View in PubMed
Less detail

Loneliness and health care consumption among older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279270
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Sep;29(3):435-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Elin Taube
Jimmie Kristensson
Magnus Sandberg
Patrik Midlöv
Ulf Jakobsson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Sep;29(3):435-43
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Linear Models
Loneliness
Male
Outpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Few studies have investigated loneliness in relation to health care consumption among frail older people. The aim of this study was to examine loneliness, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and health complaints in relation to health care consumption of in- and outpatient care among frail older people living at home. The study, with a cross-sectional design, comprised a sample of 153 respondents aged from 65 years (mean age 81.5 years) or older, who lived at home and were frail. Data was collected utilising structured interviews in the respondent's home assessing demographic data, loneliness, HRQoL and health complaints. Patient administrative registers were used to collect data on health care consumption. Loneliness was the dependent variable in the majority of the analyses and dichotomised. For group comparisons Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test and Chi-square test were used. The results showed that 60% of the respondents had experienced loneliness during the previous year, at least occasionally. The study identified that lonely respondents had a lower HRQoL (p = 0.022), with a higher total number of reported health complaints (p = 0.001), and used more outpatient services including more acute visits at the emergency department, compared to not lonely respondents (p = 0.026). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that a depressed mood was independently associated to total use of outpatient care (B = 7.4, p
PubMed ID
24826811 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patient-reported outcomes and associations with pleural effusion in outpatients with heart failure: an observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287944
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 03 20;7(3):e013734
Publication Type
Article
Date
03-20-2017
Author
Guri H Gundersen
Tone M Norekvål
Torbjørn Graven
Hilde H Haug
Kyrre Skjetne
Jens O Kleinau
Lise T Gustad
Håvard Dalen
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 03 20;7(3):e013734
Date
03-20-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - complications - psychology - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Pleural Effusion - etiology - psychology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
We aimed to study whether patient-reported outcomes, measured by quality of life (QoL) and functional class, are sensitive to pleural effusion (PLE) in patients with heart failure (HF), and to study changes in QoL and functional class during follow-up of PLE.
A cohort of 62 patients from an outpatient HF clinic was included. The amount of PLE was quantified using a pocket-sized ultrasound imaging device. Self-reports of QoL and functional class were collected using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) and the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification.
At baseline, 26 (42%) patients had PLE of which 19 (31%) patients had moderate to severe amounts of PLE. Patients with no to mild PLE had a lower MLHFQ score (mean 42, SD 21) compared with patients with a moderate to severe amount of PLE (mean 55, SD 24), p=0.03. For 28 patients (45%) with follow-up data, we observed a linear improvement of the MLHFQ-score (3.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 5.1) with each centimetre reduction of PLE. Correspondingly, patient-reported NYHA-class followed the same pattern as the MLHFQ-score.
Our study indicates that patient-reported outcome measures as MLHFQ may be sensitive tools to identify patients with HF at highest risk of symptomatic PLE and that treatment targeting reduction of PLE during follow-up is essential to improvement of QoL and functional capacity of outpatients with HF.
NCT01794715; Results.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2013 Oct;15(10):1082-9423787718
Cites: Respiration. 2013;85(1):36-4223154202
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2016 Apr;15(2):108-1126512075
Cites: Dis Mon. 2013 Feb;59(2):29-5723374395
Cites: J Card Fail. 2009 Nov;15(9):763-919879462
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2016 Aug;18(8):891-97527207191
Cites: Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2009;2009:6242-619965089
Cites: Circ J. 2011;75(7):1661-921532181
Cites: JAMA. 2012 May 9;307(18):1941-5122570462
Cites: Rev Esp Cardiol. 2010 Jun;63(6):668-7620515624
Cites: Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2015 Jul;21(4):363-726016580
Cites: Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2012 Nov;35(11):1369-7622946670
Cites: J Card Fail. 2010 Feb;16(2):150-620142027
Cites: J Heart Lung Transplant. 2001 Sep;20(9):1016-2411557198
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2012 Jul;33(14):1787-84722611136
Cites: Expert Rev Respir Med. 2015;9(6):801-1526449328
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2005 Jun;7(4):572-8215921797
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2014 Apr;16(4):384-9324515393
Cites: Heart. 2016 Jan;102(1):29-3426438785
Cites: Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2015 Oct;19(5):501-426414568
Cites: J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol. 2013 Apr;20(2):134-923609247
Cites: Palliat Med. 2014 Apr;28(4):326-3424523284
Cites: Scand Cardiovasc J. 2015 Feb;49(1):56-6325611808
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2010 Nov;12(11):1247-5220847014
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2013 Jan;15(1):94-10222989869
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Aug;14 (4):286-9325122616
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2014 Aug 7;35(30):2001-924904027
Cites: Congest Heart Fail. 2012 Sep-Oct;18(5):272-722994441
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2015 Jul 15;191:256-6425981363
PubMed ID
28320791 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patients' experience of choosing an outpatient clinic in one county in Denmark: results of a patient survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130612
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:262
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Hans O Birk
Rikke Gut
Lars O Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Region Zealand, Quality and Development, Alléen 15, 4180 Sorø, Denmark. HOB@regionsjaelland.dk.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:262
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care Facilities - utilization
Child
Choice Behavior
Denmark
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Research on patients' choice of hospital has focused on inpatients' rather than outpatients' choice of provider. We have investigated Danish outpatients' awareness and utilisation of freedom of choice of provider; which factors influence outpatients' choice of hospital, and how socio-demographic variables influence these factors in a single uptake area, where patients were free to choose any public hospital, where care was provided free at the point of delivery, and where distance to the closest hospitals were short by international standards.
Retrospective questionnaire study of 4,232 outpatients referred to examination, treatment, or follow-up at one of nine somatic outpatient clinics in Roskilde County in two months of 2002, who had not been hospitalised within the latest 12 months. The patients were asked, whether they were aware of and utilised freedom of choice of hospital.
Fifty-four percent (2,272 patients) filled in and returned the questionnaire. Forty-one percent of respondents were aware of their right to choose, and 53% of those patients utilised their right to choose. Awareness of freedom of choice of provider was reported to be especially high in female outpatients, patients with longer education, salaried employees in the public sector, and in patients referred to surgical specialties. Female outpatients and students were especially likely to report that they utilised their right to choose the provider. Short distance was the most important reason for outpatients' choice, followed by the GP's recommendations, short waiting time, and the patient's previous experience with the hospital.
Outpatients' awareness and utilisation of free choice of health care provider was low. Awareness of freedom of choice of provider differed significantly by specialty and patient's gender, education and employment. Female patients and students were especially likely to choose the clinic by themselves. Most outpatients chose the clinic closest to their home, the GP's recommendation and short waiting time being the second and third most important factors behind choice.
Notes
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 1999 Feb;11(1):47-5710411289
Cites: Med Care Res Rev. 1999;56 Suppl 1:5-2310354677
Cites: Appl Health Econ Health Policy. 2004;3(4):183-9415901193
Cites: Appl Health Econ Health Policy. 2004;3(4):195-20315901194
Cites: Int J Health Serv. 2005;35(3):479-8316119571
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2006 Jul;11(3):167-7116824264
Cites: Health Care Anal. 2007 Jun;15(2):59-7217628925
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2006 Oct;1(Pt 4):371-9418634678
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2007 Apr;2(Pt 2):125-5218634659
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Aug 12;179(4):327-3218695180
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2009 Jul;4(Pt 3):305-2719467170
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2009 Oct;4(Pt 4):479-8819715629
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2010 Jan;5(Pt 1):13-3019723352
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2010 Jan;5(Pt 1):31-5219732476
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Apr;79(1):100-519713065
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Apr 12;283(14):1866-7410770149
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Jun;58(11):2279-8915047084
Cites: J Health Polit Policy Law. 2004 Jun;29(3):491-51415328875
Cites: Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1984 Nov-Dec;29(6):58-6710268661
Cites: BMJ. 1990 May 5;300(6733):1171-32346803
Cites: J Laryngol Otol. 1990 May;104(5):417-82370469
Cites: J Rural Health. 1991 Spring;7(2):134-5210116774
Cites: Med Care Res Rev. 1995 Jun;52(2):158-9510154559
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Jun;44(11):1603-109178406
Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Improv. 1997 May;23(5):239-449179715
Cites: Inquiry. 1997 Summer;34(2):117-289256817
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2004 Dec;39(6 Pt 1):1903-2215533193
PubMed ID
21985081 View in PubMed
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.