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Attachment style among outpatients with substance use disorders in psychological treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298631
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2018 12; 91(4):490-508
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Ylva Gidhagen
Rolf Holmqvist
Björn Philips
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2018 12; 91(4):490-508
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Object Attachment
Outpatients - psychology
Psychotherapy - methods
Regression Analysis
Stress, Psychological
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the associations between self-rated attachment style, psychological distress and substance use among substance use disorder (SUD) outpatients in psychological treatment.
In this practice-based study, 108 outpatients were asked to fill in the Experiences in Close Relationships - Short form, the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) at treatment start and end. Patients were given psychological treatments with a directive, reflective or supportive orientation.
An insecure attachment style was more common among the SUD outpatients, compared to non-clinical groups. Patients with a fearful attachment style scored higher on psychological distress than patients with a secure attachment style. The associations between the attachment dimensions and psychological distress were stronger than those between attachment and SUD. Significantly more patients had a secure attachment style at treatment end.
This study shows significant relations between patients' attachment style and their initial psychological distress. The causal relationship between attachment style and psychological distress is, however, not clear and can likely go in both directions. The psychological treatment of patients with SUD contributed significantly to changes from insecure to secure attachment style.
We found among patients with SUD a strong relation between patients' attachment style and their psychological distress. Knowledge of the patient's attachment style may help the therapist to tailor the treatment to the patient's needs. A change from insecure to secure attachment style can be an important goal for a SUD treatment, as it may prevent the patient from using defence strategies involving substance use for regulating emotions and interpersonal relationships.
PubMed ID
29399945 View in PubMed
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Sexual orientation differences in outpatient psychiatric treatment and antidepressant usage: evidence from a population-based study of siblings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301956
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 Jun; 33(6):591-599
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Richard Bränström
Mark L Hatzenbuehler
Petter Tinghög
John E Pachankis
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, 60 College St., Suite 316, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. richard.branstrom@yale.edu.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 Jun; 33(6):591-599
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage
Anxiety Disorders - drug therapy
Depression - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Prospective Studies
Sexual Behavior
Sexual and Gender Minorities
Siblings
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
In the past two decades, population-based health surveys have begun including measures of sexual orientation, permitting estimates of sexual orientation disparities in psychiatric morbidity and differences in treatment utilization. The present study takes advantage of the high-quality, comprehensive nationwide health registry data available in Sweden to examine whether psychiatric outpatient treatment for various diagnoses and antidepressant medication usage are greater in sexual minority individuals compared to their siblings. A longitudinal cohort study design was used with a representative random population-based sample in Stockholm, Sweden. Registry-based health record data on all specialized outpatient health care visits and prescription drug use was linked to a sample of 1154 sexual minority individuals from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort and their siblings. The main outcomes were treatment due to psychiatric diagnoses retrieved from nationwide registry-based health records. In analyses accounting for dependency between siblings, gay men/lesbians had a greater likelihood of being treated for mood disorder [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.77; 99% confidence intervals (CI) 1.00, 3.16] and being prescribed antidepressants (AOR 1.51; 99% CI 1.10, 2.07) compared to their siblings. Further, bisexual individuals had a greater likelihood of any outpatient psychiatric treatment (AOR 1.69; 99% CI 1.17, 2.45) and being prescribed antidepressants (AOR 1.48; 99% CI 1.07, 2.05) as well as a greater likelihood of being treated for a mood disorder (AOR 1.98; 99% CI 1.33, 2.95) compared to their siblings. No difference in anxiety or substance use disorder treatment was found between any sexual minority subgroup and their siblings. The potential role of familial confounding in psychiatric disorder treatment was not supported for more than half of the outcomes that were examined. Results suggest that sexual minority individuals are significantly more likely to be treated for certain psychiatric disorders compared to their siblings. Future research is needed to understand mechanisms other than familial factors that might cause the substantial treatment differences based on sexual orientation reported here.
PubMed ID
29766438 View in PubMed
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Strengths and resources used by Australian and Danish adult patients and their family caregivers during treatment for cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289243
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2017 Aug; 29:53-59
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
E Coyne
K B Dieperink
B Østergaard
D K Creedy
Author Affiliation
Senior Lecturer, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Menzies Health Institute, Griffith University, 4131, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: e.coyne@griffith.edu.au.
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2017 Aug; 29:53-59
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Australia
Caregivers - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Oncology Nursing - methods
Outpatients - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Family plays an essential role in supporting the patient with cancer, however, relatively little attention has been given to understanding the strengths and resources of the family unit across different settings and countries. This study aims to investigate the strengths and resources of patients and family members in Australia and Denmark.
Using a descriptive, cross-sectional design, 232 patient and family participants from inpatient and outpatient oncology services in Australia and Denmark completed paper based surveys that included the Family Hardiness Index (FHI) and Family Crisis Orientated Personal Evaluation Scales (F-COPES), together with demographic and health information.
The family's appraisal of the cancer and ways the family worked together predicted the level of external resources used to manage their circumstances.
After a cancer diagnosis patients and family respond in different ways related to their family functioning. There is a need for nurses to work closely with the family to understand their strengths and resources, and tailor support and information for family to promote optimal patient outcomes.
PubMed ID
28720266 View in PubMed
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Validation of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-64): a comparison of Swedish female outpatients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa and controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301166
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2018 Jul; 72(5):347-353
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Karolin Lindberg
Lauri Nevonen
Sanna Aila Gustafsson
Erika Nyman-Carlsson
Claes Norring
Author Affiliation
a Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research , Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2018 Jul; 72(5):347-353
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Bulimia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Outpatients - psychology
Psychometrics
Random Allocation
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore the psychometric properties of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-64) and to compare levels of interpersonal distress in Swedish female outpatients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa with age- and gender-matched controls.
Totally, 401 participants were included; anorexia nervosa (n?=?74), bulimia nervosa (n?=?85) and controls (n?=?242). All participants completed the IIP-64. The eating disorder (ED) patients also filled out the Eating Disorder Inventory-2/3 (EDI).
Internal consistency of IIP-64 was acceptable to high. Principal component analyses with varimax rotation of the IIP-64 subscales confirmed the circumplex structure with two underlying orthogonal dimensions; affiliation and dominance. Significant correlations between EDI-3 composite scales ineffectiveness and interpersonal problems and IIP-64 were found. ED patients reported higher levels of interpersonal distress than controls on all but one subscale (intrusive/needy).
IIP-64 can be considered to have acceptable to good reliability and validity in a Swedish ED sample. IIP-64 can be a useful complement in assessment of interpersonal problems in ED.
PubMed ID
29703121 View in PubMed
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