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152 records – page 1 of 16.

[Aarhus Municipal Hospital Clinic for patients with chronic neuromuscular diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40735
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1981 May 25;143(22):1388-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-25-1981

[Activities of a day hospital of the city polyclinic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231617
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(2):54-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
I N Rozova
M N Krasnova
S S Kravets
N V Simakova
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(2):54-7
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Day Care - organization & administration
Female
Hospitals, Special - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Abstract
Highlighted is the experience gained in the organization of a day hospital created for general and neurologic patients at Polyclinic N 166 of the Krasnogvardeisk region of Moscow. The preliminary outcomes of the treatment of 167 patients are briefly analyzed. The results of the study on the population's opinion on the exapediency of day hospitals are provided. It is pointed out that treatment in a day hospital is regarded as an advanced form of medical care.
PubMed ID
2711236 View in PubMed
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AIDS and the small city: the cost at Kingston General Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232461
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Sep 15;139(6):557-9, 561-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1988
Author
P. Ford
D. Robertson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Sep 15;139(6):557-9, 561-2
Date
Sep-15-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - economics - nursing
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital - economics - standards
Hospitalization - economics
Hospitals, General - economics
Humans
Laboratories, Hospital - standards
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Personnel, Hospital - education
Specimen Handling - standards
Abstract
Although AIDS is often thought of as a "big-city" disease, it is also becoming a serious health care issue for doctors and other health care workers in "small-city" Canada. Kingston, Ont., is one of those small cities, and of the facilities trying to come to grips with a disease about which much remains to be learned. In this article, Drs. Peter Ford and David Robertson outline their hospital's estimate of the cost, in manpower and money, of dealing with the AIDS crisis. The final estimate: roughly $700,000. Although most of the cost will involve one-time capital spending, they point out that there will likely be ongoing labour-related costs because of the special programs and increased manpower needed to deal with AIDS patients. Clearly, AIDS is no longer a big-city disease.
PubMed ID
3409146 View in PubMed
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[Ambulatory treatment of psychiatric diseases among the deaf in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34680
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Aug 19;158(34):4763-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-1996
Author
F. Alberdi
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk afdeling, Armtssygehuset i Herlev.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Aug 19;158(34):4763-6
Date
Aug-19-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Child
Deafness - complications - psychology
Denmark
English Abstract
Humans
Mental Disorders - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
An account has been prepared describing the psychiatric treatment of preverbally deaf adults in Denmark during the period 01.01.1986 to 31.12.1991, as well as an analysis of these patients with regard to demographic and psychiatric characteristics. During this period 1231 outpatient treatments were recorded, pertaining to 168 patients. A total of 1.9-2.8% of the deaf adult population received specialised psychiatric treatment per year, either under hospitalization or as out-patients. The most dominant psychiatric diagnoses were functional psychoses (21%), serious personality disorders (25%) and affect reactions (15%). The educational levels and occupational circumstances og these patients were of a much lower standard than those of deaf adults in general. During the course of the investigation period a restructuring has taken place at the National Institution for the Deaf which has enabled a significant reduction in the duration of hospitalization in the Department of Psychiatry for the Deaf. The Institution for the Deaf now permanently accommodates 55 of the previously mentioned 168 out-patients (33%). This reorganisation has resulted in changes in the methods of treatment in the Department of Psychiatry for the Deaf towards hospitalizations of shorter duration for the treatment of acute exacerbations of serious psychiatric disorders as well as of forensic psychiatric patients.
PubMed ID
8801685 View in PubMed
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An aftercare program for problem patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244395
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Jul;32(7):493-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981
Author
D A Wasylenki
E. Plummer
S. Littmann
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Jul;32(7):493-6
Date
Jul-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aftercare - organization & administration
Aged
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Ontario
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Recurrence
Social Adjustment
Abstract
The high readmission rates of discharged psychiatric patients have forced mental health professionals to play closer attention to aftercare planning. A program was developed at a psychiatric hospital in Ontario in 1977 to deal with "problem patients"--those who were deemed difficult to place in the community by the referral person or department. The program was characterized by shared institutional-community staffing, systematic aftercare assessment and planning, a crisis intervention approach to discharge, the use of a transitional staff member with patients, and the development of close relationships with community agencies. Study data show that the program was effective in limiting the number of readmissions during its first two years to 20 per cent.
PubMed ID
6263785 View in PubMed
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Are special treatment facilities for female alcoholics needed? A controlled 2-year follow-up study from a specialized female unit (EWA) versus a mixed male/female treatment facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12305
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1989 Aug;13(4):499-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
L. Dahlgren
A. Willander
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Alcohol and Drug Research (EWA Unit), Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1989 Aug;13(4):499-504
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Combined Modality Therapy
Disulfiram - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Recurrence
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
Women with alcohol problems constitute an increasing number of patients in medical service. Do they need special care? How should the treatment program be designed? The specialized female Karolinska Project for Early Treatment of Women with Alcohol Addiction (EWA) unit at the Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, was opened in 1981. The aim of the project is to reach women in an early stage of alcohol dependence behavior and to develop treatment programs specific to the needs of females alone. In order to investigate the value of such a specialized female unit a controlled 2-year follow-up study was carried out including 200 women. The probands were treated in the female only EWA-unit, whereas the controls were placed in the care of traditional mixed-sex alcoholism treatment centers. The 2-year follow-up study showed a more successful rehabilitation regarding alcohol consumption and social adjustment for the women treated in the specialized female unit (EWA). Improvement was noted also for the controls but to a lesser extent. Probably one of the most important achievements of a specialized female unit, such as EWA, is to attract women to come for help earlier.
PubMed ID
2679204 View in PubMed
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152 records – page 1 of 16.