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A 3-year follow-up study of Swedish youths committed to juvenile institutions: Frequent occurrence of criminality and health care use regardless of drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288173
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ola Ståhlberg
Sofia Boman
Christina Robertsson
Nóra Kerekes
Henrik Anckarsäter
Thomas Nilsson
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Residential Treatment - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This 3-year follow-up study compares background variables, extent of criminality and criminal recidivism in the form of all court convictions, the use of inpatient care, and number of early deaths in Swedish institutionalized adolescents (N=100) with comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (n=25) versus those with SUD but no ADHD (n=30), and those without SUD (n=45). In addition it aims to identify whether potential risk factors related to these groups are associated with persistence in violent criminality. Results showed almost no significant differences between the three diagnostic groups, but the SUD plus ADHD group displayed a somewhat more negative outcome with regard to criminality, and the non-SUD group stood out with very few drug related treatment episodes. However, the rate of criminal recidivism was strikingly high in all three groups, and the use of inpatient care as well as the number of untimely deaths recorded in the study population was dramatically increased compared to a age matched general population group. Finally, age at first conviction emerged as the only significant predictor of persistence in violent criminality with an AUC of .69 (CI (95%) .54-.84, p=.02). Regardless of whether SUD, with or without ADHD, is at hand or not, institutionalized adolescents describe a negative course with extensive criminality and frequent episodes of inpatient treatment, and thus requires a more effective treatment than present youth institutions seem to offer today. However, the few differences found between the three groups, do give some support that those with comorbid SUD and ADHD have the worst prognosis with regard to criminality, health, and untimely death, and as such are in need of even more extensive treatment interventions.
PubMed ID
27745884 View in PubMed
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The 1000 Canadian faces of lupus: determinants of disease outcome in a large multiethnic cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151515
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;36(6):1200-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Christine A Peschken
Steven J Katz
Earl Silverman
Janet E Pope
Paul R Fortin
Christian Pineau
C Douglas Smith
Hector O Arbillaga
Dafna D Gladman
Murray Urowitz
Michel Zummer
Ann Clarke
Sasha Bernatsky
Marie Hudson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba Arthritis Center, RR149-800 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1M4, Canada. cpeschken@exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;36(6):1200-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups
Female
Health status
Humans
Income
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - economics - ethnology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Abstract
To describe disease expression and damage accrual in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and determine the influence of ethnicity and socioeconomic factors on damage accrual in a large multiethnic Canadian cohort.
Adults with SLE were enrolled in a multicenter cohort. Data on sociodemographic factors, diagnostic criteria, disease activity, autoantibodies, treatment, and damage were collected using standardized tools, and results were compared across ethnic groups. We analyzed baseline data, testing for differences in sociodemographic and clinical factors, between the different ethnic groups, in univariate analyses; significant variables from univariate analyses were included in multivariate regression models examining for differences between ethnic groups, related to damage scores.
We studied 1416 patients, including 826 Caucasians, 249 Asians, 122 Afro-Caribbeans, and 73 Aboriginals. Although the overall number of American College of Rheumatology criteria in different ethnic groups was similar, there were differences in individual manifestations and autoantibody profiles. Asian and Afro-Caribbean patients had more frequent renal involvement and more exposure to immunosuppressives. Aboriginal patients had high frequencies of antiphospholipid antibodies and high rates of comorbidity, but disease manifestations similar to Caucasians. Asian patients had the youngest age at onset and the lowest damage scores. Aboriginals had the least education and lowest incomes. The final regression model (R2=0.27) for higher damage score included older age, longer disease duration, low income, prednisone treatment, higher disease activity, and cyclophosphamide treatment.
There are differences in lupus phenotypes between ethnic populations. Although ethnicity was not found to be a significant independent predictor of damage accrual, low income was.
PubMed ID
19369456 View in PubMed
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Accumulated coercion and short-term outcome of inpatient psychiatric care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142568
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Lars Kjellin
Tuula Wallsten
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Psychiatric Research Centre, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. lars.kjellin@orebroll.se
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:53
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale - statistics & numerical data
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Discharge
Patient satisfaction
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The knowledge of the impact of coercion on psychiatric treatment outcome is limited. Multiple measures of coercion have been recommended. The aim of the study was to examine the impact of accumulated coercive incidents on short-term outcome of inpatient psychiatric care
233 involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patients were interviewed within five days of admission and at discharge or after maximum three weeks of care. Coercion was measured as number of coercive incidents, i.e. subjectively reported and in the medical files recorded coercive incidents, including legal status and perceived coercion at admission, and recorded and reported coercive measures during treatment. Outcome was measured both as subjective improvement of mental health and as improvement in professionally assessed functioning according to GAF. Logistic regression analyses were performed with patient characteristics and coercive incidents as independent and the two outcome measures as dependent variables
Number of coercive incidents did not predict subjective or assessed improvement. Patients having other diagnoses than psychoses or mood disorders were less likely to be subjectively improved, while a low GAF at admission predicted an improvement in GAF scores
The results indicate that subjectively and professionally assessed mental health short-term outcome of acute psychiatric hospitalisation are not predicted by the amount of subjectively and recorded coercive incidents. Further studies are needed to examine the short- and long-term effects of coercive interventions in psychiatric care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20584301 View in PubMed
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Acute-Phase Blood Pressure Levels Correlate With a High Risk of Recurrent Strokes in Young-Onset Ischemic Stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282505
Source
Stroke. 2016 Jun;47(6):1593-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Satu Mustanoja
Jukka Putaala
Daniel Gordin
Lauri Tulkki
Karoliina Aarnio
Jani Pirinen
Ida Surakka
Juha Sinisalo
Mika Lehto
Turgut Tatlisumak
Source
Stroke. 2016 Jun;47(6):1593-8
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Blood Pressure - physiology
Brain Ischemia - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Stroke - physiopathology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
High blood pressure (BP) in acute stroke has been associated with a poor outcome; however, this has not been evaluated in young adults.
The relationship between BP and long-term outcome was assessed in 1004 consecutive young, first-ever ischemic stroke patients aged 15 to 49 years enrolled in the Helsinki Young Stroke Registry. BP parameters included systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure at admission and 24 hours. The primary outcome measure was recurrent stroke in the long-term follow-up. Adjusted for demographics and preexisting comorbidities, Cox regression models were used to assess independent BP parameters associated with outcome.
Of our patients (63% male), 393 patients (39%) had prestroke hypertension and 358 (36%) used antihypertensive treatment. The median follow-up period was 8.9 years (interquartile range 5.7-13.2). Patients with a recurrent stroke (n=142, 14%) had significantly higher admission SBP, diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure (P
PubMed ID
27217509 View in PubMed
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Agreement between patient and proxy assessments of health-related quality of life after stroke using the EQ-5D and Health Utilities Index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181961
Source
Stroke. 2004 Feb;35(2):607-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
A Simon Pickard
Jeffrey A Johnson
David H Feeny
Ashfaq Shuaib
K C Carriere
Abdul M Nasser
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago, 60612, USA. pickard1@uic.edu
Source
Stroke. 2004 Feb;35(2):607-12
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Caregivers - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Observer Variation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Proxy - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Self Efficacy
Sickness Impact Profile
Stroke - diagnosis - physiopathology
Time Factors
Abstract
Proxy informants can provide information on patients who are limited in ability to self-assess health-related quality of life (HRQL) after stroke. One alternative is to exclude assessments of such patients and attenuate generalizability. The purpose of this study was to examine patient-proxy agreement on the domains and summary scores of the EQ-5D and Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3) after stroke.
An observational longitudinal cohort of 124 patients hospitalized after ischemic stroke and their family caregivers completed the HRQL measures at baseline and were followed up for 6 months. Patient and proxy agreement was assessed by use of weighted kappa or the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC).
At baseline, the more observable domains of HRQL demonstrated greater agreement than the more subjective components. Cross-sectional point estimates of agreement were generally acceptable (ICC >0.70) for the EQ-5D Index and HUI3 summary scores when assessed >or=1 month after baseline. Agreement between change scores was generally poor to fair (ICC
PubMed ID
14726549 View in PubMed
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Alcohol assessment and feedback by email for university students: main findings from a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107016
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;203(5):334-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Jim McCambridge
Marcus Bendtsen
Nadine Karlsson
Ian R White
Per Nilsen
Preben Bendtsen
Author Affiliation
Jim McCambridge, PhD, Faculty of Public Health & Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Marcus Bendtsen, MSc, Department of Medicine and Health, and Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Nadine Karlsson, PhD, Department of Medicine and Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Ian R. White, PhD, MRC, Biostatistics Unit, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, UK; Per Nilsen, PhD, Preben Bendtsen, PhD, Department of Medicine and Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;203(5):334-40
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Binge Drinking - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Electronic Mail
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Internet
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
Brief interventions can be efficacious in changing alcohol consumption and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk populations such as students.
To evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, controlling for the possible effects of the research process.
A three-arm parallel groups design was used to explore the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The three groups were: alcohol assessment and feedback (group 1); alcohol assessment only without feedback (group 2); and no contact, and thus neither assessment nor feedback (group 3). Outcomes were evaluated after 3 months via an invitation to participate in a brief cross-sectional lifestyle survey. The study was undertaken in two universities randomising the email addresses of all 14 910 students (the AMADEUS-1 study, trial registration: ISRCTN28328154).
Overall, 52% (n = 7809) of students completed follow-up, with small differences in attrition between the three groups. For each of the two primary outcomes, there was one statistically significant difference between groups, with group 1 having 3.7% fewer risky drinkers at follow-up than group 3 (P = 0.006) and group 2 scoring 0.16 points lower than group 3 on the three alcohol consumption questions from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C) (P = 0.039).
This study provides some evidence of population-level benefit attained through intervening with individual students.
PubMed ID
24072758 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake and prognosis of atrial fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113075
Source
Heart. 2013 Aug;99(15):1093-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Thure Filskov Overvad
Lars Hvilsted Rasmussen
Flemming Skjøth
Kim Overvad
Ida Ehlers Albertsen
Deirdre A Lane
Gregory Y H Lip
Torben Bjerregaard Larsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
Heart. 2013 Aug;99(15):1093-9
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Records, Problem-Oriented - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Thromboembolism - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To assess alcohol intake as a risk factor for adverse events among patients with incident atrial fibrillation (AF).
Prospective cohort study.
Population based cohort study and nationwide Danish registries.
The Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study included 57 053 participants (27 178 men and 29 875 women) aged between 50 and 64 years. The study population for this study included the 3107 participants (1999 men, 1108 women) who developed incident AF after inclusion.
A composite of thromboembolism or death.
During a median follow-up of 4.9 years 608 deaths and 211 thromboembolic events occurred. Of those who developed AF, 690 (35%) men and 233 (21%) women had a high intake of alcohol (>20 drinks/week for men and >13 drinks/week for women). After adjustment for use of oral anticoagulation and components of the CHA2DS2-VASc score, men with an intake of >27 drinks/week had a higher risk for thromboembolism or death (hazard ratio (HR) 1.33, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.63) than men with an intake of 20 drinks/week also had a higher risk (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.96) than women in the low intake category. The higher risk among men was primarily driven by mortality (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.20 to 1.89), whereas the risk found among women was driven by thromboembolism (HR 1.71, 95% CI 0.81 to 3.60).
High alcohol intake predicts thromboembolism or death, even after adjustment for established clinical risk factors, and may help identify high risk AF patients who could be targeted for stroke and cardiovascular prevention strategies.
PubMed ID
23766449 View in PubMed
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Analytic versus systemic group therapy for women with a history of child sexual abuse: 1-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259757
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Henriette Elkjaer
Ellids Kristensen
Erik L Mortensen
Stig Poulsen
Marianne Lau
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Interpersonal Relations
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Abstract
This randomized prospective study examines durability of improvement in general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning and interpersonal problems, and compares the long-term efficacy of analytic and systemic group psychotherapy in women 1 year after completion of treatment for childhood sexual abuse.
Women (n = 106) randomly assigned to analytic or systemic psychotherapy completed the Symptom Checklist-90-R, Global Assessment of Functioning, Global Life Quality, Registration Chart Questionnaire, and Flashback Registration at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at a 1-year follow-up.
Post-treatment gains were significant for both treatment modalities on all measures, but significantly larger after systemic therapy. Significant treatment response was maintained 1-year post-treatment, but different trajectories were observed: 1 year after treatment completion, improvements for analytic therapy were maintained, whereas they decreased after systemic therapy, resulting in no statistically significant difference in gains between the groups at the 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining significant gains, more than half of the patients remained above cut-off for caseness concerning general symptomatology at post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up.
The findings stress the importance of long-term follow-up data in effect studies. Different trajectories were associated with the two treatments, but improvement in the two treatment groups did not differ significantly at the 1-year follow-up. Implications of the difference in trajectories for treatment planning are discussed.
Both analytic and systemic group therapy proved efficient in improving general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning, and interpersonal problems in women with a history of CSA and gains were maintained at a 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining statistically significant gains at the 1-year follow-up, 54% of the patients remained above the cut-off for caseness with respect to general symptomatology, which may indicate a need for further treatment. Different pre-post follow-up treatment trajectories were observed between the two treatment modalities. Thus, while systemic group therapy showed a significantly better outcome immediately after termination, gains in the systemic treatment group decreased during follow-up, while gains were maintained during follow-up in analytic group therapy.
PubMed ID
24014477 View in PubMed
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Anticoagulant treatment of patients in Swedish primary health care. Safety aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71950
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Apr;57(1):61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
P E Wändell
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine Stockholm, Karolinska Institutet, Novum, S-141 57 Huddinge, Sweden. Per.Wandell@slpo.sll.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Apr;57(1):61-4
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Female
Hemorrhage - chemically induced
Humans
International Normalized Ratio - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prothrombin Time
Risk factors
Safety
Sweden
Thromboembolism - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Assessing the quality of anticoagulant (AC) treatment in primary health care with regard to safety. DESIGN: Surveys of patients on AC treatment during 1999. SETTING: Community health centres (CHCs) in the northeastern region of Stockholm County. SUBJECTS: Nine hundred and fifty-seven patients, from 16 CHCs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of bleeding and thromboembolic events during AC treatment and rate of values within the recommended treatment interval. The reporting of prothrombin-time (PT) results changed during the year from PT values to international normalised ratio (INR). RESULTS: A total of 48 bleeding events in 44 patients were noted, i.e. 6.8 per 100 patient-years. Of these, ten were major bleedings, 1.4 per 100 patient-years, including three fatal bleedings, 0.4 per 100 patient-years. Six thrombo-embolic events were noted during treatment, i.e. 0.8 per 100 patient-years. Bleeding events were more common at INR values greater than 2.80 than at values of 2.80, [relative risk (RR) 3.30, 95% confidence interval 1.90-5.71]. Of all the noted PT values, 65% were within the recommended intervals (the most common being PT 15-25%) and of all noted INR values 60% (the most common being INR 2.1-3.0). No differences in the rate of bleeding or the number of thrombo-embolic events between the periods of PT and INR results were found. CONCLUSIONS: The rate of complications was low and AC treatment in primary health care seems to be as safe as in hospital clinics.
PubMed ID
11372594 View in PubMed
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Are risk estimates biased in follow-up studies of psychosocial factors with low base-line participation?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133140
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:539
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Linda Kaerlev
Henrik A Kolstad
Ase Marie Hansen
Jane Frølund Thomsen
Anette Kærgaard
Reiner Rugulies
Sigurd Mikkelsen
Johan Hviid Andersen
Ole Mors
Matias B Grynderup
Jens Peter Bonde
Author Affiliation
Danish Ramazzini Centre, Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital and Regional Hospital Herning, Aarhus C, Denmark. L.Kaerlev@dadlnet.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:539
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Sample Size
Abstract
Low participation in population-based follow-up studies addressing psychosocial risk factors may cause biased estimation of health risk but the issue has seldom been examined. We compared risk estimates for selected health outcomes among respondents and the entire source population.
In a Danish cohort study of associations between psychosocial characteristics of the work environment and mental health, the source population of public service workers comprised 10,036 employees in 502 work units of which 4,489 participated (participation rate 45%). Data on the psychosocial work environment were obtained for each work unit by calculating the average of the employee self-reports. The average values were assigned all employees and non-respondent at the work unit. Outcome data on sick leave and prescription of antidepressant medication during the follow-up period (1.4.2007-31.12.2008) was obtained by linkage to national registries.
Respondents differed at baseline from non-respondents by gender, age, employment status, sick leave and hospitalization for affective disorders. However, risk estimates for sick leave and prescription of antidepressant medication, during follow-up, based on the subset of participants, did only differ marginally from risk estimates based upon the entire population.
We found no indications that low participation at baseline distorts the estimates of associations between the work unit level of psychosocial work environment and mental health outcomes during follow-up. These results may not be valid for other exposures or outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21736760 View in PubMed
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182 records – page 1 of 19.