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Acceptability of adolescents' occlusion in Finnish municipal health centres with differing timing of orthodontic treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148539
Source
Eur J Orthod. 2010 Apr;32(2):186-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Ilpo Pietilä
Terttu Pietilä
Anna-Liisa Svedström-Oristo
Juha Varrela
Pentti Alanen
Author Affiliation
Oral Health Services, Health Centre of Pori, Finland. ilpo.pietila@pori.fi
Source
Eur J Orthod. 2010 Apr;32(2):186-92
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Dental Health Services
Dental Occlusion
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Malocclusion - therapy
Observer Variation
Odds Ratio
Orthodontics, Corrective - methods
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Public Health Dentistry - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of the study was to compare the acceptability of occlusion among orthodontically treated and untreated adolescents in eight Finnish municipal health centres applying different timing of treatment. A random sample of 16- and 18-year olds (n = 2325) living in these municipalities was invited for a clinical examination, and 1109 adolescents participated. Two calibrated orthodontists blindly examined the participants for the acceptability of occlusion with the Occlusal Morphology and Function Index. The history of orthodontic treatment was elicited by questionnaire. The impact of the history and timing of treatment on the acceptability of occlusion was analysed with logistic regression analysis. The history of orthodontic treatment decreased the odds for acceptability of morphology [odds ratio (OR) = 0.719, 95 per cent confidence limit (CL), P = 0.016] and acceptability of function (OR = 0.724, 95 per cent CL, P = 0.018). The early timing of treatment increased the odds for acceptability of morphology (OR = 1.370, 95 per cent CL, P = 0.042) and of function (OR = 1.420, 95 per cent CL, P = 0.023). No substantial differences were observed in the acceptability of occlusion between the early and late timing health centres. However, the proportion of subjects with acceptable occlusion was slightly higher in the early than in the late timing group. These findings suggest that when examining the effect of timing on treatment outcome, factors other than acceptability of occlusion should be concomitantly evaluated. Consequently, in this context, the duration and cost of treatment need to be investigated.
PubMed ID
19755611 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of an online tool to assess appropriateness for an epilepsy surgery evaluation-A population-based Swedish study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299157
Source
Epilepsy Res. 2018 09; 145:140-144
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2018
Author
Sara Lukmanji
K Chelsea Altura
Bertil Rydenhag
Kristina Malmgren
Samuel Wiebe
Nathalie Jetté
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, 1403 29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N2T9, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, 1403 29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N2T9, Canada.
Source
Epilepsy Res. 2018 09; 145:140-144
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy - diagnostic imaging - physiopathology - surgery
Female
General Surgery - methods
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Online Systems
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The Canadian Appropriateness of Epilepsy Surgery (CASES) tool was developed to help physicians identify patients who should be referred for an epilepsy surgery evaluation. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of this tool using a population-based cohort registry (the Swedish National Epilepsy Surgery Register) of patients who underwent epilepsy surgery between 1990 and 2012.
Overall, 1044 patients met eligibility criteria for the study and were deemed to be surgical candidates by epilepsy experts. Demographic and epilepsy related characteristics were examined and summarized using descriptive statistics. A CASES appropriateness score was calculated for each of these patients. Chi squared analyses or fisher's exact tests were used to determine if there were any relationships between demographic and epilepsy related characteristics not captured in the tool and appropriateness scores.
The mean appropriateness score was 8.6 and 985 (Sensitivity: 94.35%; 95% CI, 92.77%-95.60%) patients were appropriate, 46 (4.41%; 95% CI, 3.31%-5.84%) were uncertain, and 13 (1.25%; 95% CI, 0.72%-2.13%) were inappropriate for an epilepsy surgery evaluation. The mean necessity score, which was only calculated for the 985 appropriate patients, was 8.7. All 13 inappropriate patients had tried less than two anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). In addition, age at onset of epilepsy and age at epilepsy surgery were both significantly associated with appropriateness score.
These results demonstrate that the CASES tool is highly sensitive as it designated 94.3% of epilepsy surgery patients as appropriate for an epilepsy surgery evaluation. All of those classified as inappropriate were not drug resistant, as they had not yet tried two AEDs.
PubMed ID
30007238 View in PubMed
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The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS): development and validation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79476
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2007 Mar;35(3):421-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Nilsson-Helander Katarina
Thomeé Roland
Grävare-Silbernagel Karin
Thomeé Pia
Faxén Eva
Eriksson Bengt I
Karlsson Jon
Author Affiliation
Lundberg Laboratory for Orthopaedic Research, Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Sweden. ina.nilsson@telia.com
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2007 Mar;35(3):421-6
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achilles Tendon - injuries
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Questionnaires
Rupture
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is a need for a patient-relevant instrument to evaluate outcome after treatment in patients with a total Achilles tendon rupture. PURPOSE: To develop and validate a new patient-reported instrument for measuring outcome after treatment for total Achilles tendon rupture. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 1. METHODS: Development of this instrument consisted of item generation and test construction, item reduction, validation, evaluation of structure and internal consistency, test-retest, and test for responsiveness. The final version, the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), was tested for validity, structure, and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) on 82 patients and 52 healthy persons. A correlation analysis was performed of the ATRS with the 2 validated foot/ankle/Achilles tendon scores, the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) and the Swedish version of the Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles questionnaire (VISA-A-S). Structure was evaluated with factor analysis. Test-retest reliability was evaluated on 43 patients. The ATRS responsiveness was tested on 43 patients by calculating the effect size. RESULTS: The total score for the patients ranged from 17 to 100 with a mean (median) of 77 (85) and a standard deviation (interquartile range) of 21.4 (23). A significantly (P
PubMed ID
17158277 View in PubMed
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[A comparative assessment of the methods of prediction of outcomes of acute peritonitis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152417
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 2008;167(6):96-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Kh A Gamzatov
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 2008;167(6):96-9
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Peritonitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
An analysis of results of treatment of 212 patients with peritonitis of different etiology allowed the author to establish main factors (clinical and laboratory), responsible for the level of lethality. A scheme of assessment of the outcome of the disease is proposed. It has advantages over the Mannheim Peritonitis Index.
PubMed ID
19241827 View in PubMed
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Acute minor thoracic injuries: evaluation of practice and follow-up in the emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144888
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Mar;56(3):e117-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Jean-François Shields
Marcel Emond
Chantal Guimont
Dany Pigeon
Author Affiliation
l'Université Laval, Quebec.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Mar;56(3):e117-24
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Canada
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Rib Fractures - diagnosis - epidemiology
Thoracic Injuries - epidemiology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
To review the management and follow-up of patients with minor thoracic injuries (MTI) treated by emergency or primary care physicians.
A multicentre, retrospective study.
Three university-affiliated emergency departments of the metropolitan region of Quebec city, Que.
Patients older than 16 years of age with suspected or proven rib fractures following traumatic events.
Differences in admission and discharge proportions and disposition management following MTI.
Four hundred and forty-seven charts were analyzed. Only 23 patients (5.2%) were admitted during the study period. Admission and discharge proportions were significantly different among the 3 surveyed hospitals, ranging from 1.3% to 15.2% (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
20228291 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and validation of the Cambridge pulmonary hypertension outcome review for Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119278
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):777-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Nedim Selimovic
Bengt Rundqvist
Ewa Kjörk
Johan Viriden
James Twiss
Stephen P McKenna
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. nedim.selimovic@vgregion.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):777-83
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - physiopathology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Psychometrics
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Translating
Young Adult
Abstract
The Cambridge pulmonary hypertension outcome review (CAMPHOR) is the first pulmonary hypertension-specific instrument for the assessment of the patient's perceived symptoms, activity limitations and quality of life (QoL).
To produce and validate a Swedish language version of the CAMPHOR.
Bilingual (n = 5) and lay panels (n = 5) were conducted to translate the CAMPHOR into Swedish. This new questionnaire was then field-tested with 14 patients and finally, it underwent psychometric evaluation by means of a postal validation study involving 38 patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH).
Few problems were experienced in translating the CAMPHOR into Swedish. The field-test participants found the scales relevant, comprehensible and easy to complete. Psychometric analyses showed that the Swedish adaptation was successful. The Swedish CAMPHOR scales had good internal consistency. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.92 for the symptoms scale, 0.92 for activity limitations and 0.95 for the quality of life. Predicted correlations with the Nottingham Health Profile provided evidence of the construct validity of the scales. The Swedish scales also indicated known groups validity.
The Swedish version of the CAMPHOR is a reliable and valid measure of the impact of pulmonary hypertension on the lives of affected patients. It is recommended for use in clinical studies and routine practice in pulmonary hypertension patients.
PubMed ID
23117210 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of the Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) into French-Canadian and English-Canadian.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158194
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 Mar;15(2):77-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Donna Coffin
Karine Duval
Simon Martel
John Granton
Marie-Claude Lefebvre
David M Meads
James Twiss
Stephen P McKenna
Author Affiliation
Actelion Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc, Laval, Canada. donna.coffin@actelion.com
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 Mar;15(2):77-83
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
France
Health status
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - classification - diagnosis
Language
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) is the first disease-specific instrument for assessing patient-reported symptoms, functioning and quality of life (QoL) in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).
To create and validate French-Canadian (FC) and English-Canadian (EC) language versions of the CAMPHOR.
A translation panel (for the FC version) and lay panels (for both versions) were convened to adapt the questionnaires (dual-panel methodology). Subsequently, these new questionnaires were field-tested in 15 FC PAH and 15 EC PAH patients. Finally, in a postal validation study, the new language versions of the CAMPHOR underwent psychometric evaluation in 41 FC and 52 EC PAH patients to test for reliability and validity.
The FC and EC field-test interview participants found the questionnaires relevant, comprehensible and easy to complete. Psychometric analyses showed that the FC and EC adaptations were successful. High test-retest coefficients for the scales after controlling for change in respondent's QoL (FC: 0.92 to 0.96; EC: 0.85 to 0.99) indicated a high degree of reliability. The FC and EC CAMPHOR scales had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficients 0.90 to 0.92 and 0.88 to 0.92, respectively). Predicted correlations with the Nottingham Health Profile provided evidence of the construct validity of the FC and EC scales. The FC and EC adaptations also showed known groups validity.
The FC and EC adaptations of the CAMPHOR have been shown to be reliable and valid for measures of health-related QoL and QoL in PAH, and thus can be recommended for use in clinical studies and routine practice in PAH.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18354747 View in PubMed
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Administrative data accurately identified intensive care unit admissions in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168382
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;59(8):802-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Damon C Scales
Jun Guan
Claudio M Martin
Donald A Redelmeier
Author Affiliation
Department of Critical Care, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, G1 06, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. damon.scales@utoronto.ca
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;59(8):802-7
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases as Topic
Health Services Research
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance Claim Reporting
Intensive Care Units - utilization
Medical Record Linkage
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Predictive value of tests
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To evaluate the accuracy of Ontario administrative health data for identifying intensive care unit (ICU) patients.
Records from the Critical Care Research Network patient registry (CCR-Net) were linked to the Ontario Health Insurance Program (OHIP) database and the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) database. The CCR-Net was considered the criterion standard for assessing the accuracy of different OHIP or CIHI codes for identifying ICU admission.
The highest positive predictive value (PPV) for ICU admission (91%) was obtained using a CIHI special care unit (SCU) code, but its sensitivity was poor (26%). A strategy based on a combination of CIHI SCU codes yielded a lower PPV (84%) but a higher sensitivity (92%). A strategy based purely on OHIP claims yielded further reductions in PPV (73%), gains in specificity (99%), and moderate sensitivity (56%). The highest sensitivity (100%) was obtained using a combination of CIHI and OHIP codes in exchange for poor PPV (32%).
Administrative databases can be used to identify ICU patients, but no single strategy simultaneously provided high sensitivity, specificity, and PPV. Researchers should consider the study purpose when selecting a strategy for health services research on ICU patients.
PubMed ID
16828673 View in PubMed
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Altered health status and quality of life in South Asians with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131706
Source
Am Heart J. 2011 Sep;162(3):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Kevin R Bainey
Colleen M Norris
Milan Gupta
Danielle Southern
Diane Galbraith
Merril L Knudtson
Michelle M Graham
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Am Heart J. 2011 Sep;162(3):501-6
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Cardiac Catheterization
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
People of South Asian (SA) ancestry are susceptible to coronary artery disease (CAD). Although studies suggest that SA with CAD has a worse prognosis compared with Europeans, it is unknown whether corresponding differences in functional status and quality-of-life (QOL) measures exist. Accordingly, we compared symptoms, function, and QOL in SA and European Canadians with CAD using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ).
Using the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease, an outcomes registry that captures patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in Alberta, Canada, we identified 635 SA and 18,934 European patients with angiographic CAD from January 1995 to December 2006 who reported health status outcomes using the SAQ at 1 year after the index catheterization. To obtain comparable clinical variables among SA and Europeans, we used a propensity score-matching technique.
One-year adjusted mean (SD) scores were significantly lower in SA compared with European Canadians for most SAQ domains: exertional capacity (75 [23] vs 80 [23], P = .011), anginal stability (77 [28] vs 77 [27], P = .627), anginal frequency (86 [23] vs 88 [20], P
PubMed ID
21884867 View in PubMed
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Amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) predicts outcome after cardiac arrest and induced hypothermia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169206
Source
Intensive Care Med. 2006 Jun;32(6):836-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Malin Rundgren
Ingmar Rosén
Hans Friberg
Author Affiliation
Lund University Hospital, Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. malin.rundgren@skane.se
Source
Intensive Care Med. 2006 Jun;32(6):836-42
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Coma
Electroencephalography - methods
Female
Heart Arrest
Humans
Hypothermia, Induced
Intensive Care Units
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate the use of continuous amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) as a prognostic tool for survival and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia.
Prospective, observational study.
Multidisciplinary intensive care unit in a university hospital.
Comatose survivors of cardiac arrest were treated with induced hypothermia for 24 h. An aEEG recording was initiated upon arrival at the ICU and continued until the patient regained consciousness or, if the patient remained in coma, no longer than 120 h. The aEEG recording was not available to the ICU physician, and the aEEG tracings were interpreted by a neurophysiologist with no knowledge of the patient's clinical status. Only clinically visible seizures were treated.
Thirty-four consecutive hypothermia-treated cardiac arrest survivors were included. At normothermia (mean 37 h after cardiac arrest), the aEEG pattern was discriminative for outcome. All 20 patients with a continuous aEEG at this time regained consciousness, whereas 14 patients with pathological aEEG patterns (flat, suppression-burst or status epilepticus) did not regain consciousness and died in hospital. Patients were evaluated neurologically upon discharge from the ICU and after 6 months, using the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scale. Eighteen patients were alive with a good cerebral outcome (CPC 1--2) at 6-month follow-up.
A continuous aEEG pattern at the time of normothermia was discriminative for regaining consciousness. aEEG is an easily applied method in the ICU setting.
PubMed ID
16715325 View in PubMed
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270 records – page 1 of 27.