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A 3-year follow-up of headache diagnoses and symptoms in Swedish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81846
Source
Cephalalgia. 2006 Jul;26(7):809-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Laurell K.
Larsson B.
Mattsson P.
Eeg-Olofsson O.
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. katarina.laurell@akademiska.se
Source
Cephalalgia. 2006 Jul;26(7):809-15
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Migraine Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Students - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Tension-Type Headache - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Information is sparse concerning the incidence and prognosis of headache in children from the general population, especially of tension-type headache. In this study, headache diagnoses and symptoms were reassessed in 122 out of 130 schoolchildren after 3 years. Nearly 80% of those with headache at first evaluation still reported headache at follow-up. Although the likelihood of experiencing the same headache diagnosis and symptoms was high, about one-fifth of children with tension-type headache developed migraine and vice versa. Female gender predicted migraine and frequent headache episodes predicted overall headache at follow-up. The estimated average annual incidence was 81 and 65 per 1000 children, for tension-type headache and migraine, respectively. We conclude that there is a considerable risk of developing and maintaining headache during childhood. Headache diagnoses should be reassessed regularly and treatment adjusted. Girls and children with frequent headache have a poorer prognosis and therefore intervention is particularly important in these groups.
PubMed ID
16776695 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up of participation in peer support groups after a cardiac event.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53243
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Otto Torells Gata 16, Varberg 432 44, Sweden. Catherine.Hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - rehabilitation
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Peer Group
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Groups
Sweden
Abstract
Secondary prevention is an important component of a structured rehabilitation programme following a cardiac event. Comprehensive programmes have been developed in many European countries, the vast majority of which are hospital based. In Sweden, all patients with cardiac disease are also given the opportunity to participate in secondary prevention activities arranged by the National Association for Heart and Lung Patients [The Heart & Lung School (HL)]. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal study was to compare persons who attended the HL after a cardiac event and those who declined participation, with regard to health aspects, life situation, social network and support, clinical data, rehospitalisation and mortality. Totally 220 patients were included in the study. The patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire on four occasions, in addition to visiting a health care center for physical examination. After 3 years, 160 persons were still participating, 35 of whom attended the HL. The results show that persons who participated in the HL exercised more regularly, smoked less and had a denser network as well as more social support from nonfamily members than the comparison groups. This study contributes to increased knowledge among healthcare professionals, politicians and decision makers about peer support groups as a support strategy after a cardiac event.
PubMed ID
15572020 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up study of Swedish youths committed to juvenile institutions: Frequent occurrence of criminality and health care use regardless of drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288173
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ola Ståhlberg
Sofia Boman
Christina Robertsson
Nóra Kerekes
Henrik Anckarsäter
Thomas Nilsson
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Residential Treatment - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This 3-year follow-up study compares background variables, extent of criminality and criminal recidivism in the form of all court convictions, the use of inpatient care, and number of early deaths in Swedish institutionalized adolescents (N=100) with comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (n=25) versus those with SUD but no ADHD (n=30), and those without SUD (n=45). In addition it aims to identify whether potential risk factors related to these groups are associated with persistence in violent criminality. Results showed almost no significant differences between the three diagnostic groups, but the SUD plus ADHD group displayed a somewhat more negative outcome with regard to criminality, and the non-SUD group stood out with very few drug related treatment episodes. However, the rate of criminal recidivism was strikingly high in all three groups, and the use of inpatient care as well as the number of untimely deaths recorded in the study population was dramatically increased compared to a age matched general population group. Finally, age at first conviction emerged as the only significant predictor of persistence in violent criminality with an AUC of .69 (CI (95%) .54-.84, p=.02). Regardless of whether SUD, with or without ADHD, is at hand or not, institutionalized adolescents describe a negative course with extensive criminality and frequent episodes of inpatient treatment, and thus requires a more effective treatment than present youth institutions seem to offer today. However, the few differences found between the three groups, do give some support that those with comorbid SUD and ADHD have the worst prognosis with regard to criminality, health, and untimely death, and as such are in need of even more extensive treatment interventions.
PubMed ID
27745884 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study of adolescents who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107628
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Sheilagh Hodgins
Sara Lövenhag
Mattias Rehn
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Maria-Ungdom Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parents
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that substance misuse in adolescence is associated with increased risks of hospitalizations for mental and physical disorders, convictions for crimes, poverty, and premature death from age 21 to 50. The present study examined 180 adolescent boys and girls who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden. The adolescents and their parents were assessed independently when the adolescents first contacted the clinic to diagnose mental disorders and collect information on maltreatment and antisocial behavior. Official criminal files were obtained. Five years later, 147 of the ex-clients again completed similar assessments. The objectives were (1) to document the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUD) and drug use disorders (DUD) in early adulthood; and (2) to identify family and individual factors measured in adolescence that predicted these disorders, after taking account of AUD and DUD in adolescence and treatment. Results showed that AUD, DUD, and AUD + DUD present in mid-adolescence were in most cases also present in early adulthood. Prediction models detected no positive effect of treatment in limiting persistence of these disorders. Thus, treatment-as-usual provided by the only psychiatric service for adolescents with substance misuse in a large urban center in Sweden failed to prevent the persistence of substance misuse. Despite extensive clinical assessments of the ex-clients and their parents, few factors assessed in mid-adolescence were associated with substance misuse disorders 5 years later. It may be that family and individual factors in early life promote the mental disorders that precede adolescent substance misuse.
PubMed ID
23989597 View in PubMed
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10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties: a report on 780 cases from the Swedish Ankle Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129819
Source
Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):655-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Anders Henricson
Jan-Åke Nilsson
Ake Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics , Falun Central Hospital and Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden. anders.henricson@ltdalarna.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):655-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Ankle - adverse effects - methods
Cementation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Joint Prosthesis - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Registries
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis.
Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint-excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus.
Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79-0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67-0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons.
The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements-even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22066551 View in PubMed
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12-month follow-up of an exploratory 'brief intervention' for high-frequency cannabis users among Canadian university students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124885
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2012;7:15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Benedikt Fischer
Wayne Jones
Paul Shuper
Jürgen Rehm
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addictions, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, 2400, 515 West Hastings St,, Vancouver, BC, V6B 5K3, Canada. bfischer@sfu.ca
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2012;7:15
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Young Adult
Abstract
One in three young people use cannabis in Canada. Cannabis use can be associated with a variety of health problems which occur primarily among intensive/frequent users. Availability and effectiveness of conventional treatment for cannabis use is limited. While Brief Interventions (BIs) have been shown to result in short-term reductions of cannabis use risks or problems, few studies have assessed their longer-term effects. The present study examined 12-month follow-up outcomes for BIs in a cohort of young Canadian high-frequency cannabis users where select short-term effects (3 months) had previously been assessed and demonstrated.
N=134 frequent cannabis users were recruited from among university students in Toronto, randomized to either an oral or a written cannabis BI, or corresponding health controls, and assessed in-person at baseline, 3-months, and 12-months. N=72 (54%) of the original sample were retained for follow-up analyses at 12-months where reductions in 'deep inhalation/breathholding' (Q=13.1; p
Notes
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Cites: Int Rev Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;21(2):96-10319367503
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Cites: Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):324-722032094
PubMed ID
22538183 View in PubMed
Less detail

18 years of results with cemented primary hip prostheses in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register: concerns about some newer implants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147752
Source
Acta Orthop. 2009 Aug;80(4):402-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Birgitte Espehaug
Ove Furnes
Lars B Engesaeter
Leif I Havelin
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. birgitte.espehaug@helse-bergen.no
Source
Acta Orthop. 2009 Aug;80(4):402-12
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - methods
Bone Cements
Cementation
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Prosthesis - adverse effects
Humans
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prosthesis Failure
Registries
Time Factors
Abstract
Few studies have compared the long-term survival of cemented primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs), and several prostheses have been used without adequate knowledge of their endurance. We studied long-term outcome based on data in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register.
The 10 most used prosthesis brands in 62,305 primary Palacos or Simplex cemented THAs reported to the Register from 1987 through 2007 were included. Survival analyses with revision as endpoint (for any cause or for aseptic loosening) were performed using Kaplan-Meier and multiple Cox regression with time-dependent covariates. Revision rate ratios (RRs) were estimated for the follow-up intervals: 0-5, 6-10, and > 10 years.
5 prosthesis brands (cup/stem combinations) (Charnley, Exeter, Titan, Spectron/ITH, Link IP/Lubinus SP; n = 24,728) were investigated with 0-20 year follow-up (inserted 1987-1997). After 18 years, 11% (95% CI: 10.6-12.1) were revised for any cause and 8.4% (7.7-9.1) for aseptic loosening. Beyond 10 years of follow-up, the Charnley cup had a lower revision rate due to aseptic loosening than Exeter (RR = 1.8) and Spectron (RR = 2.4) cups. For stems, beyond 10 years we did not find statistically significant differences comparing Charnley with Titan, ITH, and SP stems, but the Exeter stem had better results (RR = 05). 10 prosthesis brands (9 cups in combination with 6 stems; n = 37,577) were investigated with 0-10 years of follow-up (inserted from 1998 through 2007). The Charnley cup had a lower revision rate due to aseptic loosening than all cups except the IP. Beyond 5 years follow-up, the Reflection All-Poly cup had a 14 times higher revision rate. For stems, beyond 5 years the Spectron-EF (RR = 6.1) and Titan (RR = 5.5) stems had higher revision rates due to aseptic loosening than Charnley. The analyses also showed a marked improvement in Charnley results between the periods 1987-1997 and 1998-2007.
We observed clinically important differences between cemented prosthesis brands and identified inferior results for previously largely undocumented prostheses, including the commonly used prosthesis combination Reflection All-Poly/ Spectron-EF. The results were, however, satisfactory according to international standards.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19857178 View in PubMed
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30-Day Mortality after Cardiovascular Events in Persons with or without Alzheimer's Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274270
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(1):241-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jari Heiskanen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Risto P Roine
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(1):241-9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemorrhagic Disorders
Humans
Male
Morbidity
Myocardial Infarction
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Proportional Hazards Models
Residence Characteristics
Stroke
Abstract
Persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been suggested to receive suboptimal treatment. We studied the 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, or myocardial infarction in individuals with or without AD.
An exposure matched cohort of all Finnish community-dwellers diagnosed with clinically verified AD in 2005-2012 (n?=?73,005) and 1-4 matched comparison persons/AD-affected person (n?=?215,449). Data on 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke (n?=?16,419; deaths: n?=?2,748), hemorrhagic stroke (n?=?3,570; deaths: n?=?1,224), and myocardial infarction (n?=?15,304; deaths: n?=?3,804) were obtained from the National Hospital Discharge register. The main analyses were restricted to first-ever events.
Persons with AD had slightly higher 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke (adjusted HR 1.36, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.24,1.49), hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.98,1.25), or myocardial infarction (adjusted HR, 1.40, 9% CI 1.30,1.51). The associations were not affected by age, gender, or co-morbidities and remained similar when patients with previous ischemic strokes or infarctions were included. The absolute risk increase in 30-day mortality after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and myocardial infarction were 4.9% (95% CI 3.3,6.5), 3.3% (95% CI - 1.6,8.2), and 7.5% (95% CI 5.0,10.0), respectively.
Although the 30-day mortality was somewhat higher in the AD cohort, the absolute differences were small indicating that acute treatment was not notably inferior in AD patients. The slightly higher mortality was not explained by co-morbidities but may reflect the higher mortality of AD persons in general, or treatment practice of patients with severe cognitive impairment.
PubMed ID
26401944 View in PubMed
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The 1000 Canadian faces of lupus: determinants of disease outcome in a large multiethnic cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151515
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;36(6):1200-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Christine A Peschken
Steven J Katz
Earl Silverman
Janet E Pope
Paul R Fortin
Christian Pineau
C Douglas Smith
Hector O Arbillaga
Dafna D Gladman
Murray Urowitz
Michel Zummer
Ann Clarke
Sasha Bernatsky
Marie Hudson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba Arthritis Center, RR149-800 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1M4, Canada. cpeschken@exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;36(6):1200-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups
Female
Health status
Humans
Income
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - economics - ethnology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Abstract
To describe disease expression and damage accrual in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and determine the influence of ethnicity and socioeconomic factors on damage accrual in a large multiethnic Canadian cohort.
Adults with SLE were enrolled in a multicenter cohort. Data on sociodemographic factors, diagnostic criteria, disease activity, autoantibodies, treatment, and damage were collected using standardized tools, and results were compared across ethnic groups. We analyzed baseline data, testing for differences in sociodemographic and clinical factors, between the different ethnic groups, in univariate analyses; significant variables from univariate analyses were included in multivariate regression models examining for differences between ethnic groups, related to damage scores.
We studied 1416 patients, including 826 Caucasians, 249 Asians, 122 Afro-Caribbeans, and 73 Aboriginals. Although the overall number of American College of Rheumatology criteria in different ethnic groups was similar, there were differences in individual manifestations and autoantibody profiles. Asian and Afro-Caribbean patients had more frequent renal involvement and more exposure to immunosuppressives. Aboriginal patients had high frequencies of antiphospholipid antibodies and high rates of comorbidity, but disease manifestations similar to Caucasians. Asian patients had the youngest age at onset and the lowest damage scores. Aboriginals had the least education and lowest incomes. The final regression model (R2=0.27) for higher damage score included older age, longer disease duration, low income, prednisone treatment, higher disease activity, and cyclophosphamide treatment.
There are differences in lupus phenotypes between ethnic populations. Although ethnicity was not found to be a significant independent predictor of damage accrual, low income was.
PubMed ID
19369456 View in PubMed
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[Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in Uppsala. Good experiences from the first four years--the rest of Sweden on its way].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100154
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Sep 22-28;107(38):2232-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anders Wanhainen
Sverker Svensjö
Martina Tillberg
Kevin Mani
Martin Björck
Author Affiliation
Kärlkirurgiska sektionen, VO kirurgi, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala. andwan@algonet.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Sep 22-28;107(38):2232-6
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - mortality
Aortic Rupture - mortality - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
21043165 View in PubMed
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2397 records – page 1 of 240.